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Old 01-31-2009, 07:48 PM   #43
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Thank you for bringing us back to the purpose of the original post. Just shows how easily discussion drifts.
Well it certainly drifted in that post....used the original as a start point and ended on how to bring the anchor home using a sheet winch

Rather than a foot switch on my windlass I have a wandering lead that I can use anywhere on the boat.
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Old 01-31-2009, 08:32 PM   #44
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Hi Guys this is a big topic i dint know this was on a lot of people minds

I have 27 foot sail sloop before that i had a Maurice Griffin steel 29 f

Dint not have to much problems anchoring as you know here in AU qld coast we have some big tides

Average anchoring is in 7-12M water and using 12Kg plough anchor roll our 30m chain and 10m nylon rope (adjusted to suit )

I keep my anchor sharpened on the point and flutes so anchor Will grab/cut in to seabed very good on hard sand

Ones i laid anchor and lash rope on both cleats run both through bowroler rubber rollers to stop frail ling

i put motor in reverse at 2800rp (15HP motor) for 30sec to lock in anchor with 90% success rate

Forces are distribute over both cleats this is better than securing to windlass

And i leave small bit of main sail (depends on wind situation)

Will give you proper night sleep if done this way

Just try this and let me know of you agree with anchoring this way
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Old 01-31-2009, 09:00 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by lynger1 View Post
Average anchoring is in 7-12M water and using 12Kg plough anchor roll our 30m chain and 10m nylon rope (adjusted to suit )

I keep my anchor sharpened on the point and flutes so anchor Will grab/cut in to seabed very good on hard sand

Just try this and let me know of you agree with anchoring this way
Sounds good to me. I have heard that quite a few people in South Oz sharpen the flukes on their fisherman style anchors to help them set in hard sand.

Cheers

Frank
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Old 01-31-2009, 11:18 PM   #46
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Lynger1,

You're doing a bridle type arrangement which is fine--assuming very fair lead, the only issue you may have is how those cleats are attached to your hull and if you're willing to have them rip out at some point due to unusual loading.

The image you show reminds me of something I read by a cruiser recently. They talked about the changes they made in anchoring technique after starting to cruise. They had been using two anchors off the bow or one from the bow, one from the stern--when concerned about holding. Well, they discovered the uncomfortable motion of being in an anchorage with wind from one direction and waves from another--you know, that whole wallow all over the place thing? They decided to use a bridle technique with a single anchor to combat the motion as the motion was not only uncomfortable but also leading to anchor(s) walking and dragging. With their newly discovered method, the anchor was attached to a cleat or Sampson post on the bow (sorry, don't recall their detail there) and they would attach another line to the anchor rode and running back to a primary sheet winch. Then, by adjusting this second line they could change the angle of the boat to the anchor so that it rode best for the combined wind and sea conditions. Of course, the line would be adjusted when conditions changed. After using this technique, they completely stopped using two anchors on two separate anchor rodes entirely as they found this method to be superior in terms of holding.

I have not employed this bridle method using bow cleat and a sheet winch on the stern, but is does seem to make sense and we plan to check it out once we've re-launched our boat.

Best of luck to you
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Old 02-01-2009, 12:02 AM   #47
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Hi yes you're right when you ue standard cleats

i re-installed cleats with large backing plates trough deck

So i increased holding square aria its 200% larger than windlass
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Old 02-02-2009, 09:10 AM   #48
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the anchor was attached to a cleat or Sampson post on the bow (sorry, don't recall their detail there) and they would attach another line to the anchor rode and running back to a primary sheet winch. Then, by adjusting this second line they could change the angle of the boat to the anchor so that it rode best for the combined wind and sea conditions.
I have used this technique in a number of locations where 'normal' anchoring gives an uncomfortable motion and it works very well.

The secondary rode is attached to the anchor rode about 20-30' from the bow and brought back to a stern fairlead and made up on a sheet winch. By tensioning it up you can set the boat to ride the waves in the most comfortable fashion and adjust it as required when wind or tide change.

Go on - try it!
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:11 PM   #49
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Quote:
the anchor was attached to a cleat or Sampson post on the bow (sorry, don't recall their detail there) and they would attach another line to the anchor rode and running back to a primary sheet winch. Then, by adjusting this second line they could change the angle of the boat to the anchor so that it rode best for the combined wind and sea conditions.
... but it works only as long as the (tidal) current and/or the wind in force and direction are very stable. If not, this method can be quite nervewrecking.

And think of the forces the anchor has to take care of under the situation of stronger current or increasing wind from (almost) abeam . The forces on the anchor can be tremendous.

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Old 02-02-2009, 06:49 PM   #50
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... but it works only as long as the (tidal) current and/or the wind in force and direction are very stable. If not, this method can be quite nervewrecking.

And think of the forces the anchor has to take care of under the situation of stronger current or increasing wind from (almost) abeam . The forces on the anchor can be tremendous.

Uwe

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That's the point--you lengthen or shorten the line to sheet winch to place the boat in the best angle respective to all the forces--wind, current, seas--that you face.

I'll have to go searching for the cruiser's website where I found the information--as it was quite clearly presented, probably more so than I am doing now.

Fair winds,

Brenda
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Old 02-05-2009, 11:16 AM   #51
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Hi this is a hot topic sorry about this (but helpfull)

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Old 02-05-2009, 06:32 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by redbopeep View Post
That's the point--you lengthen or shorten the line to sheet winch to place the boat in the best angle respective to all the forces--wind, current, seas--that you face.

I'll have to go searching for the cruiser's website where I found the information--as it was quite clearly presented, probably more so than I am doing now.

Fair winds,

Brenda
Back when Noah was a deck boy it was in seamanship books as a means for big ships to make a lee when working cargo from barges etc.

I tried it once on the yacht for a few hours in a small ( maybe 1 foot) residual slop making the yacht roll horribly when she was lying to the new but light breeze. Worked OK. I don't think you would use it in a strong stream or wind etc.

Saludos,

Frank
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Old 02-05-2009, 09:01 PM   #53
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Lots of anchorages in the Caribbean, particularly those exposed to the south, can have a very unpleasant roll due to the southern swell that rolls into the anchorage. *Although the winds in the Carib. are reliably brisk, in a good anchorage there's little fetch and so it's quite comfortable..... unless that blasted southern swell has found its way into the anchorage. *Then the arrangement that Brenda describes can be very useful, rather than putting out a stern anchor. *so many anchorages in the Carib are crowded that often it is not possible to put out a stern anchor.

When we tried it in Vieques Isl., the sand bottom was very soft with a current running, and the anchor kept dragging. *Peter gave it up in frustration, and we didn't try it again for a couple years until he forgot how annoyed he was. *Then the conditions were right and we were the only boat in the anchorage that didn't roll sickeningly.
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Old 02-06-2009, 10:29 AM   #54
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One thing this setup doesn't need is a sheet winch. Just set up a chain hook on the rode... take the pennant aft and make it fast. Adjust the angle of attack by paying out the anchor rode.....
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