Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > General Cruising Forum
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-05-2005, 02:10 AM   #15
PDX Sailing
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Converted Post'
Originally posted by Dumpster

Hello Tom

So many questions can be answered just by reading. With that simple skill I researched and learned all I needed to know,
Good post, and I also enjoy reading. I'm forty-one and can't figure out how to escape yet. I have to ask-- did you work out a way to raise funds while under way, or are you living off investments? I know, the money thing, but I'm always encouraged by stories like yours.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2005, 04:29 AM   #16
Ensign
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 7
Default

Hello PDX Sailing

While I was sailing I lived of money I had saved $400.00 per month is not a lot of money now days. But I did most or nearly all of my dining on my Vessel. I did not rent cars unless I shared the expense with other cusisers. I was careful as are many folks, I found most of the average cruisers are nearly broke all the time. Some have a small income from a rented house back home or funds from selling their home or whatever. I'am not sailing right now I,am stuck in NJ, domestic issues you see. But I am planning to escape soon. It's as nearly as expensive to keep a vessel berthed in the summer and hauled out in the winter as it is to sail her. The key for me was to plan well and keep my expensives reasonable. Good Luck

Fair winds

D
__________________

__________________
Dumpster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2005, 09:21 AM   #17
tel
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 48
Default

Tom,

I'm 55 now. If I could not sail, I would start learning straight away. A good way is to buy a small yacht and sail it locally on weekends. Find somebody who can sail to get you going. You will learn a lot quickly and will also get some big frights, which are necessary in the learning curve. Once you're confident with your local ability, try sailing out of the bay into the deep blue sea a few times. Then down the coast a bit. Next thing you know, you're hundreds of miles away. Learn bit by bit. I find you learn by increments and by osmosis. I'm still learning and I've been sailing most of my adult life. Age is irrelevant, it's attitude which is important. I expect I'll be able to sail with a hearing aid and a wooden leg. Above all, it's a great thing to do, and it's fun - even the scary bits, in retrospect.

Cheers....Tel
__________________
tel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2005, 01:18 AM   #18
Ensign
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3
Default

This is a great post. Its just been so really good to see folks (sailors) who are living their dreams. I came back to read today after my original comment and reading this post really made me smile. I am newly encouraged not that I ever lost the will. I will sail and not man, money nor weather will stop me. Thanks Tom for starting it and thanks to all of those with positive ideas and encouraging suggestions.
__________________
midshipman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2005, 01:06 PM   #19
christal
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Tom,

When I met my husband he had paintings and magazines galore on sailing. He had built a 21 ft. Luger kit boat and sailed it on Lake Texoma over 20 yrs ago. He read and studied the book "The Handbook of Sailing" by Bob Bonds while he built the Luger. He had sold the boat many years before we met. When I saw all the sailing "stuff" I retorically asked him "So, where's your sailboat?" He replied that he didn't have one. My grandmother had taught me that dreams are important so I said, "Let's go find you one." After looking for a couple of months we found a 1980 30 ft Hunter and bought her. On the sea trial, having never sailed before in my life, he wasn't sure I would like it and his bubble would burst. Once the motor was cut and the sails made that glorious "whump" sound as we piched up and filled the sails, I was hooked. Rough seas, calm seas, I don't care...as long as we're cutting through the water, even dipping the toe rails. We now have a bigger boat and are in Central America living the dream he had since he was a boy on a farm in Oklahoma.

If you feel the seas waiting to be explored tugging at your heart, calling you out there, GO. Do what you want, live your dream, feel the freedom of riding the waves and the lost land-legs wobble under you as you arrive at your next port.

Live your dream,

CJS
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-2005, 05:21 PM   #20
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 69
Default

Christal, What a great message to wake up to. Dumpster & Tel, Thanks for your input. We are reading , we are dreaming , we are saving.

I am leaning toward a Sailing school in the Grenadines just because I am so busy in the Summer doing landscaping. The winter is the only time I have off right now. My son is 13 and I figure in the six years it takes for him to be " emancipated " I will learn to sail.

KEEP EM COMING and thanks again for all the postive responses.

I remain landlocked in The Berkshires

TOM
__________________
Tom Cecilia Marie
Tom Farley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2005, 04:31 AM   #21
Ensign
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2
Default

Tom,

I can see one HUGE potential problem with your plan to do Winter sailing school in the Caribbean . . . you will love it so much that you will be desperate to bring your sailing plans forward.

We won a 2 week bareboat charter in the BVI last Oct/Nov and had an absolutely fantastic time. As soon as we came back to Scotland we made a definite timetable for going back to the Caribbean next year for a minimum of six months in our own boat. We are pretty poor and the boat is only a 27 footer (but plenty of Albin Vegas have crossed the Atlantic). We are early 50s and determined to do it now - or very soon - no matter how many plausible reasons there are for not doing it.

Go for it . . .

<font color="blue">Nick</font id="blue">

BlueMoment.Com

UK Sail Cruising

http://www.bluemoment.com
__________________
NickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 05:10 AM   #22
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 69
Default

To All of you who have been so nice to Respond _

As of today we are confirmed for a two week sailing school in the Grenadines in December. Ya hoo.

More to come

I remain

Tom In the Berkshires
__________________
Tom Cecilia Marie
Tom Farley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 04:32 PM   #23
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,727
Default

Good-onya Tom. Learn heaps and remember it is important to remain properly hydrated. David
__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 08:42 PM   #24
Ensign
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 24
Default

Tom,

Tel has it spot on. Buy a small boat and just get out there. Never mind if the local yachties rib you every time you make a mistake, which you will and its always very public! By being out there in your own boat you will gain far more experience than any other way. Take along a seasoned sailor to begin with and you can question why he advises you to do certain actions. On the job training is always the best in my opinion, you can see what is happening and gain knowledge when things go right as well as wrong.

As for books, try the Wanderer books by Eric Hiscock. Around the World in Wanderer III has been my constant companion for more years that I care to remember. It was this that sparked my imagination and led me to crossing the Atlantic in my own 24 ft boat. Hiscock had a knack of writing which had you spell bound and longing to get the sea spray on your face.

Age? If you are relatively fit then you can sail, go out there before you begin to fall to bits and see some of the fantastic world we are priviledged to live in. If you get stuck there will always be a friendly yachtie ready to lend a hand.

Go sailing and to hell with the Jerimaiahs of this world. Of course you will have bad days, really bad days, but the good ones are the ones that memories are made of and there are always many more of those. Live the dream!

Best Wishes

David
__________________
David Shipton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2005, 08:30 AM   #25
gen
Ensign
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 1
Default

Hello,

I'm a sailing instructor from canada, I teach lots and lots of adults, the young and the young at heart.

I would suggest anybody who would like to learn sailing to take a course. I hear pretty good things about the ASA system, your instructors will be trained and hopefully, fun. For the older folks who want to cruise, a keelboat or cruising course will probably be best. Once you take a course, you'll have a better idea of the type of sailing you want to do, and hopefully the kind of boat you want to buy.

Dinghies are not for everyone. They requre you to be relatively athletic and while i don't doubt that most of you are, they can be uncomfortable and more difficult to learn on for older folks. Granted, the best sailors learn on dinghies but you probably just want to learn how to sail safely and have fun.

And if some guys out there want to take their wives/girlfriends or girls wanna take their guys sailing, be generous and get them a course as a present! its a lot less stressfull than trying to teach them yourselves, and they'll have a more relaxed time on the boat when they know that if something happens, they can safely handle the boat etc.

P.S. - The Canadian Yachting Association Certifications system is one of the best. Look for CYA certification if you're taking carribean learn-to-sail courses.
__________________
gen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2005, 03:30 PM   #26
Ensign
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 7
Send a message via ICQ to bonezed
Default

I'm a few weeks ahead of the original poster...

the last few years I have been in computers 24x7 (job AND hobby). Anyway, I figured I needed a new hobby so I started getting into sailing .

I started with getting my Competant Crew certificate, as well as purchasing a book on the basics. Also bought a few magazines (Yachting World) and a chart of Port Jackson (Sydney). Also reading lots of websites

And last weekend I went down to the CYCA (http://cyca.com.au/) and got a crewing position. So once a week I am crewing.

As for the future, my dream is to be bluewater cruising in ~10 years. Dream boat is a Sundeer 64

Blue water cruising is not for the unprepared or inexperienced. The next ten years will be a steep learning curve. So much to learn... weather patterns, navigation, radio comms, boat repair etc etc

Anyway, good sailing to all
__________________
bonezed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2005, 04:41 AM   #27
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 69
Default

I posted a note Last MARCH about starting to learn how to sail.

On Saturday Dec. 3rd, TWO DAYS from Now, We [ Diana & I ] Leave for a Sailing School in the Grenadines for TWO weeks.

This is the Start of the 10 YEAR PLAN - Here we go...Thank you all for all your support
__________________
Tom Cecilia Marie
Tom Farley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2006, 03:26 AM   #28
Ensign
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 10
Send a message via MSN to johnnyonspot
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Converted Post'
Originally posted by Tom Farley

I cant sail yet but
I recall a senior chief torpedoman in the US Navy who, anytime he heard someone say "I can't" do this or that, would gruffly say, "CAN'T NEVER DID NOTHIN'!"
__________________

__________________
Johnny Neophyte
johnnyonspot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
books


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Necessary Books For Cruisers Springtideklj Ship's Library 2 02-21-2012 07:12 AM
Only 4 Books You'll Ever Need atavist Ship's Library 3 02-21-2012 07:09 AM
One Step Closer - Chart Advice, Cat Advice, Tom Farley General Cruising Forum 25 03-21-2008 09:38 PM
Wanted Used Books Harbor_Pilot Cruiser's Market 0 06-28-2007 03:36 AM
looking for advice on books ichyprints General Cruising Forum 4 07-04-2005 02:57 PM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0