Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > General Cruising Forum
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-15-2008, 03:16 AM   #1
Ensign
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 1
Default

I'm sure you could cruise around the Caribbean in just about anything if you really wanted to, but realisticly, is a 30' catalina sloop an ok boat to cruise on if your fine with the small size? How about taking a boat like that outside the caribbean, like from the caribbean to australia, or fiji?
__________________

__________________
rakasha681 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2008, 03:57 AM   #2
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rakasha681 View Post
I'm sure you could cruise around the Caribbean in just about anything if you really wanted to, but realisticly, is a 30' catalina sloop an ok boat to cruise on if your fine with the small size? How about taking a boat like that outside the caribbean, like from the caribbean to australia, or fiji?
You might want to check out this discussion on an earlier CL topic:

link
__________________

__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2008, 03:24 PM   #3
Rear Admiral
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 396
Default

More than what the boat is capable of. Is what is the skipper capable of? People having taken the most unlikely craft around the world, and crossed oceans. A good skipper can take just about anything anywhere. A badf skipper can lose the finest boat in calm seas.......i2f
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2008, 12:52 PM   #4
Lieutenant
 
Bajamas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 68
Default

Link to Atom. A 28' Triton that made 2 circumnavigations (One, I believe, without engine or power):

http://www.atomvoyages.com/

Bajamas
__________________
Goin' where the weather suits my clothes!
Bajamas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2008, 04:45 AM   #5
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bajamas View Post
Link to Atom. A 28' Triton that made 2 circumnavigations (One, I believe, without engine or power):

http://www.atomvoyages.com/

Bajamas
A Triton is a very different boat than a Catalina...the first boat over 14' that I sailed on was a Triton. Very sound little boat. Can't say the same for the small Catalinas.
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2008, 04:51 PM   #6
Rear Admiral
 
Aquaria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Home Port: Hamburg GER
Vessel Name: Aquaria
Posts: 278
Default

First of all, it is not a matter of size! There were times when a boat of 30ft was a normal size to take on extended cruises.

So, it is just a matter of comfort and maybe luxury that lets sailors choose bigger boats nowadays.

Back in the 70ies and 80ies many boats of around 30ft were built for offshore sailing, today built boats of this size are most times light weight coastal cruisers with spacious interiors and in fact good sailing performance in decent conditions that meet the weekenders needs (sailing a couple hours and then tying up an the marina for the night..)

And I did not know the 28' Triton before. What a nice little rugged boat!

Cheers

Uwe

perfectly content with 32ft

SY Aquaria
__________________
If you have the time, you alwas have the right winds.

More on my Centurion 32:
http://www.cabinetdeparodontologie.n...ria/index.html
I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: Germany, Background, Cruising/Sailing the German Bight
Aquaria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2008, 05:38 PM   #7
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaria View Post
There were times when a boat of 30ft was a normal size to take on extended cruises.

SY Aquaria
If you want a wonderful bluewater boat that is small--find a Rawson 30! They're great, solid, and can go anywhere you'd like to take them. We were privileged to own on for two years and can attest to the seaworthiness of the design. Further, they're often inexpensive (may require some "fix up") ranging in price from $5K to $35K depending upon condition, electronics, etc.
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 02:23 AM   #8
Ensign
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16
Default

Catalina's are always under rated. Get a self steer, some solar panels, a bimini and dodger and start in the Caribbean. The learning curve is steep and after a couple of overnighters you'll understand the plus and minus of the boat. I've learned over the years, Sail what you got.
__________________
Bellamar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 09:27 PM   #9
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellamar View Post
Catalina's are always under rated. Get a self steer, some solar panels, a bimini and dodger and start in the Caribbean. The learning curve is steep and after a couple of overnighters you'll understand the plus and minus of the boat. I've learned over the years, Sail what you got.
"under rated?" No, many folks think highly of the Catalinas--just not for cruising. I know many people who love their small Catalinas for what they are--an inexpensive boat that is great for the Wednesday night harbor races and great for weekend trips and mild coastal cruising. They are by no means built to withstand the rigors of long passages involving ocean crossing and someone who pushes one into real cruising service is likely to be disappointed as these boats won't hold up over time to the punishment of the long distance cruising environment. It's just not what they were built for.

One can easily get a better small cruising vessel for the same money as a Catalina. If one already owns a Catalina, I'd still suggest selling and getting into a different small boat designed for cruising. If someone hands you a Catalina 30 on a silver platter, fully outfitted for cruising with every bell and whistle...maybe...nah...just sell it--they're easy to sell since everyone knows what they are and they're a respectable boat--and take the money to find a real cruising boat.
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2009, 02:29 AM   #10
Captain, Sailboat Reboot
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Home Port: None
Vessel Name: Reboot
Posts: 110
Send a message via AIM to svReboot
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by redbopeep View Post
"under rated?" No, many folks think highly of the Catalinas--just not for cruising. I know many people who love their small Catalinas for what they are--an inexpensive boat that is great for the Wednesday night harbor races and great for weekend trips and mild coastal cruising. They are by no means built to withstand the rigors of long passages involving ocean crossing and someone who pushes one into real cruising service is likely to be disappointed as these boats won't hold up over time to the punishment of the long distance cruising environment. It's just not what they were built for.
You are of course welcome to your opinion. However a large number of Catalina sailboats are rated by the ABYC as Category "A" - Ocean including the Catalina 30 MK III.

See http://www.catalinayachts.com/certif.cfm

I will not argue about the merits of a Catalina vs other designs. However it is incorrect to say "It's just now what they were buit for."
__________________
Roger
Current position http://www.winlink.org/dotnet/maps/Positio...?callsign=W2ZDB
Ham: W2ZDB Reboot: WDB8435
Web Site: http://www.sailboatreboot.com
Blog:http://blog.sailboatreboot.com
svReboot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2009, 11:11 AM   #11
Admiral
 
MMNETSEA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,067
Default

Of course the Catalina can sail the oceans - as most sailboats have proven -

However, very few Catalinas (and there are many) under 40ft that are found cruising the oceans. Whatever the reason, the fact is that they are not to be seen in anchorages, marinas - or in broker's listings outside the USA.
__________________
MMNETSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2009, 08:15 PM   #12
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by svReboot View Post
it is incorrect to say "It's just now what they were buit for."
Looking into it--you're right, technically, the Catalina 30 (MK III and others) were actually built for cruising. That's amazing to me since here in So Cal where there are many, many, many Catalinas sailing, no one that I know of... including Catalina owners...thinks of these boats as real cruising boats. But rather as fun weekend boats that one can also do a little coastal cruising in.

From my interaction with numerous Catalina owners, I always figured the boats were marketed for the weekend sailor/coastal cruiser. Live and learn...

Oh, and now that I look at it, the Catalina 30 is actually a 34' boat! more learning...It seems they jump from the 27 which IS 27' LOA to the 30 which is 34' LOA...must be a 30' waterline? Who'd have known...
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2009, 12:11 AM   #13
Captain, Sailboat Reboot
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Home Port: None
Vessel Name: Reboot
Posts: 110
Send a message via AIM to svReboot
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by redbopeep View Post
Looking into it--you're right, technically, the Catalina 30 (MK III and others) were actually built for cruising. That's amazing to me since here in So Cal where there are many, many, many Catalinas sailing, no one that I know of... including Catalina owners...thinks of these boats as real cruising boats. But rather as fun weekend boats that one can also do a little coastal cruising in.

From my interaction with numerous Catalina owners, I always figured the boats were marketed for the weekend sailor/coastal cruiser. Live and learn...

Oh, and now that I look at it, the Catalina 30 is actually a 34' boat! more learning...It seems they jump from the 27 which IS 27' LOA to the 30 which is 34' LOA...must be a 30' waterline? Who'd have known...
I am not sure that I disagree with you analysis of the target market for Catalina. I would expect that it is reassuring to most purchasers that the boats are "sturdy" (for lack of a better term.) On the other hand the large open salon area, limited tankage, and limited storage space would suggest boats more suitable for short pleasant cruises.

We do multi-day racing in our Catalina 42 two cabin. At least one stateroom and one head are turned into storage space for extra sails and crew gear. Conditions in the Great Lakes can get very severe (as the "Mouth of the South" found out) and I have never questioned the seaworthness of my Catalina. On the other hand my previous boat was a steel hulled Bruce Roberts Offshore 44. I loved the cutter rig and the center cockpit and having a steel hull was very reassuring.

I know of families of 4 that have gone offshore for long periods (including circumnavigations) in the 42. I think they must get very good at the old adage "a place for everything and everything in its place."

BTW, thanks for pointing out you are in SoCal. In Milwaukee it is 41 degrees and sleeting. Isn't life grand!
__________________
Roger
Current position http://www.winlink.org/dotnet/maps/Positio...?callsign=W2ZDB
Ham: W2ZDB Reboot: WDB8435
Web Site: http://www.sailboatreboot.com
Blog:http://blog.sailboatreboot.com
svReboot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 05:39 PM   #14
Ensign
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 16
Default

Up and down the Caribbean for 5 years, Florida, Cuba and onto Grenada. Must have been up and down at least twice a year and you will be surprised to see how many Catalina's are out there. Remember, Morgan's after 1996 are all technically Catalina's. Hell, we saw a guy sail a 35 C&C from Europe. 35 gals of water and 20 of diesel. It's what you make of it. Tell me where the boat will fail. The hull is solid, add ons should be well backed, and the rest is comfort.
__________________

__________________
Bellamar is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Extended Stay Down Under... Trim50 Regional Discussion Topics 27 09-02-2012 06:34 AM
Catalina 42 Peter Owen Our Virtual Yacht Club 8 12-19-2009 07:41 PM
Selling Katadyn Powersurvivor 80e (desalinator) + Extended Cruise Kit nickvr Cruiser's Market 3 01-04-2009 05:51 PM
Selecting Batteries For Extended Cruising Trim50 General Cruising Forum 9 04-12-2007 02:55 PM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0