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Old 08-23-2006, 08:44 PM   #15
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My personal opinion is that a monohull is a more forgiving sailboat than a multihull. Make a mistake with a catamaran and you could bring down the rig. A monohull will lay down, mast and sails in the water, and come back up again. A bit scary, but not the end of your sail.

A 45-foot catamaran is a house! It has two or more heads, 4 cabins, it's just a monster. How much room do you need? Admittedly, more than 17 years on a monohull, and now we have a small power catamaran, space is not a big issue with us.

Although I prefer to anchor out, sometimes we like to go to a dock to do a good cleaning on the boat, charge the batteries and wander around for a day or so. We only did it once this year because they wanted $3.00 per foot for a side tie (no slip, we were too wide). That's $102 for the privilege of tying alongside a dock buffeted by the wake of every boat that went by. Pah! And this was a friendly marina with plenty of space. I hear the Med is 'way more expensive.

Not to discourage you, but I suggest you start small. That first adjustment, whatever the size of the boat, is the most difficult. I think that if you do it significantly small the first time you'll reset your expectations so much that the next boat will feel incredibly luxurious. Of course, I've been playing "bait and switch" with my head for years. Some people are harder to fool than I am.
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Old 08-23-2006, 11:28 PM   #16
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Hi Will,

We've a shiny (well almost new) Hanse 461 which has more space than two people really need - but it suits us perfectly.

At 46 foot - IMHO it is about as large as I'd want to boat when handling in heavy weather or indeed, parking it up in a small space with a strong breeze.

Re those high Med marina costs - no exaggeration. We've been hit with 220 euros for one night in Pt Sabinas / Formentera with our 46' mono in 05 - and had no option but to pay as we had repairs that needed dockside access. Even relatively bigger facilities on Mallorca / Ibiza / Menorca charge as high as 3 eu plus per quare foot in high season.

A 13 x 6 metre cat would equate to 78 sq metres so work it out yourself.

I would not argue a cat has a huge amount of room on board but the big question is do you - especially if sailing solo really need it all - bearing in mind what it will cost on all fronts?

The other guys, suggesting something smaller - might be an option to look at.

Cheers

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Old 08-25-2006, 09:22 AM   #17
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We bought a Hudson Force 50 with the idea that we had family to take with us. Now one died (don't be sad, she was 90 and at least got to dream of cruising with us!) and the other is off on his own, so it's essentially Michael and me. Which is rather nice, really, as we can have any one or more of the kids and friends come for a visit. We do enjoy the space. And the fact that our hefty old gal can really handle the sea.

Do think cost when you consider length or width. In the Sea of Cortez--which is a great place to live on the cheap as long as you don't set foot on a marina dock--we paid to do that based on the added length of our bowsprit. Now, a bowsprit is a great way to have lots of smaller sails--she's a ketch--but having to pay for six feet of non-liveable space made me say "ouch!"

A catamaran at dock will be just as problematic.

If you avoid the Med and just anchor out, and if you avoid storms that could tip you unhappily, then a cat certainly has lots of room. But if you can find a pilothouse monohull (I love having a pilothouse--I can really see out and it's great in the rain) that isn't too big, you still have a feeling of space because of all that light, without the huge cost.

We all have different ideas, based on what works for us and what we know. We'll be living on a limited budget in nine weeks--whether we like it or not. So, our limited budget is what it will take us to cruise this time out!

Blessings,

Normandie
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Old 09-01-2006, 06:21 AM   #18
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If you want more information on cruising costs including budget breakdowns, I suggest you check out the sailnet articles. They have several indepth articles on what people have spent and their decision making on weather or not go get insurance, etc which greatly affects costs.
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Old 09-01-2006, 07:06 AM   #19
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Thanks to everybody for the advice. I certainly needed it, and have taken it 'on-board' (Excuse the pun)

It's nice to be in the company of such friendly, knowledgeable sailors.
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Old 09-12-2006, 05:23 PM   #20
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Hi,

There's a lot of useful information here which is confirmed by long terms sailors. The truth is - there is an intangible thing about how much it costs - YOU and YOUR attitude. I am a minimalist and I have learnt to live on the smell of an old rag. Differentiating between what I need and what I want. Those concepts are themselves loaded and vary enormously from one person to the next.

My lifestyle is not one that I would recommend to everyone. But by keeping things simple and being very disciplined about that you can do all the things that you want. I learnt that early as a poor student. I had to find ways to make each buck stretch and the experience has stood me in good stead. I took to cruising like a duck to water.

It has enabled me to indulge all those facets of my nature that enabled me to be seduced as a hippie in the sixties. Sadly I left that behind for a professional life that has enabled me to aquire substantial wealth. Ok ok I hear you say so he's a millionaire what the hell. Believe me when I say THAT is NOT what it is all about.

I absolutely adore living the simple life and I indulge that on my modest yacht. I could easily buy the expensive yacht with all the bells and whistles which means complication and expense but that is not why I chose this lifestyle.

Living modestly is all about a state of mind. Although I will say making people understand that has been the hardest part. Not with fellow yachties but landlubbers and the so called normal people who just cannot uderstand why I would want to force myself to live in what they see as penury.

The truth is my life has been enriched by living on a yacht. I am healthier and happier than I have ever been.

What started me off was Annie Hill's book and especially the yarn (which she cites as a true story) about the ten pound millionaire. It gave me confidence to know that you can live simply to achieve what you want and and (wait for it) I have no difficulty living on my yacht comfortably on $50.00 a week here in Australia. Sure you can't afford marinas for that, or have boat or health insurance, you also have to go without nights out on the town, grog, videos and expensive hobbies and pastimes - things I certainly don't have. Meals are of necessity mundane and based on what is cheap and available but you will be amazed how far a little rice and spice can go. The $50.00 per week does not cover capital expenses or even major breakages or haulouts. So far though (touch wood) after two years none of those things have been substantial.

Some might see my lifestyle as pathetic after years of hard work and acbievement. And I can understand that. I guess it is a bit like those business tycoons who after years of hard work give their billions away. It is hard to fathom. Hey but if the money doesn't make you happy....why not?

The bottom line for anyone embarking on the lifestyle is that it can be whatever you make it. If you want to keep it cheap then you have to understand that you will have to be very disciplined and keep everything - and I mean everything - simple. That may be a successful business adage but it works in other areas too.

The cruising lifestyle is not the life for everyone and not everyone wants to do it. Those that do and succeed find a whole new dimension in life - again it is a personal perspective that transcends all the competetive, selfish and materialistic mores that are part of our socialisation.

OK, so now you think I am a space cadet too. Not so - but if there is anything in what I have said that resonates in you then you too may have what it takes. Yes - the money is important but only to a limited extent. Most people don't realise that they have more than enough money to go sailing full time. Again it is all about your state of mind.

The eastern mystics have a wonderful approach to the sort of negativity that plagues us when we try to make such major decisions -its called "monkey mind". You have to learn to put that (pesky) negative "monkey mind" behind you and take control of your life if you want to move on.

Still concerned? Remember only $50.00 per week! Not much really and probably a lot cheaper and more benefical for you in the long run health wise. So whaddoyasay????

Let the naysayers and disbelievers begin. I hear them cracking their nuckles in eager anticipation to pound their responses already....

bring it on....as they say.

RdotC....
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Old 09-12-2006, 06:50 PM   #21
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Hi Ryan, what style and design of boat do you sail? Dave.
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Old 09-13-2006, 12:30 AM   #22
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Well.....there is a resonance. And I enjoyed the read. Also I am encouraged because I can afford double what it costs you.

Bet the food is healthier too.

I split up from my last partner because her vision of living in Spain (Where we almost moved to last year....she did, I didn't !!) was Porsches, champagne and Puerto Banus. Mine was flip-flops and Cava (Tastes great to me....the Cava, not the flip-flop). And she didn't like boats.

So in addition to boat, I am now looking for an experienced (Sailing)female companion to help me choose a boat, sail and visit different places. So if you know of any single/divorced/seperated etc in Ozz looking for a bit of adventure with a handsome (In a rough sort of way)middle-aged, easy-going Scotsman, who wants to sail the dream....tell her to contact me.

Anyway, back to the point. I relate a lot to what you say. Although not a hippy (I was in the Royal Navy at the time and they wouldn't let me grow my hair long...despite me telling them I would keep it tucked under my cap), I did go on to be reasonably successful in business. Despite that, much prefer the type of lifestyle and values you expound. Maybe not so Draconian, but along similar lines.

So, thanks for the advice and I wish you well on your voyages. Don't forget the limejuice though. Believe it is a great cure for scurvey around your neck of the woods.

Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Converted Post'
Originally posted by RdotC

Hi,

There's a lot of useful information here which is confirmed by long terms sailors. The truth is - there is an intangible thing about how much it costs - YOU and YOUR attitude. I am a minimalist and I have learnt to live on the smell of an old rag. Differentiating between what I need and what I want. Those concepts are themselves loaded and vary enormously from one person to the next. ............

........................

RdotC....
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Old 11-08-2006, 03:16 AM   #23
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Go for it!! the cat that is. This year I bought a Lagoon 380 for med cruising and its been fab. A simple boat with great handling and a lovely turn of speed, its generaly well thought out mechanicaly and has been easy to work on. Travel with 8 in relative comfort and hold a pontoon party on board. Out of season and away from the big marinas I have found berthing costs not too bad and sometimes positively charitable (do they know my bank manager?) I will be cruising throughout the Med next year look out for NISROC if you make it down here. Good luck.
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Old 11-08-2006, 04:45 AM   #24
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I posted on another cruising forum asking about costs of live-aboard crusing. I made a user poll where people could give their annual live-aboard budget. So far about 60 live-aboards have given their annual live-aboard cost/budget. The results are as follows:

$0-$10,000 13 (23%)

$10,000-$15,000 8 (14%)

$15,000-$20,000 6 (10%)

$20,000-$25,000 7 (12%)

$25,000-$35,000 7 (12%)

$35,000-$50,000 7 (12%)

$50,000-$100,000 6 (10%)

Over $100,000 3 (5%)

As you can see, there is a broad spread of budgets (just like in land-based life). Plenty of people are getting by on less than 10k per year. Some lucky blighters have over 100k per year, and a lot of people are somewhere in between. The bottom line seems to be that you can modify your live-aboard crusing lifestyle to suit your budget... sure it will involve some compromises, but "enough" money is what you decide is enough.
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Old 11-16-2006, 09:03 PM   #25
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Weyalan:

That's useful info. Can you be more specific? Over what period of time was the poll conducted (how long ago?) and what region(s) tended to dominate in the responses. (E.g. the W Pacific is cheaper than the Med).

Jack
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Old 11-17-2006, 06:53 AM   #26
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The poll was conducted on another on-line cruising forum. I started the poll in mid june this year, and the poll is still open for voting, so the data has been collected over the last 5 months. I have not specified any regions in the poll, so there is no way of analysing the data by region. It is my gut feeling that the bulk of the subscribers to the forum are from the USA.

Edited to add...

I should also add that the time until the day that I can sail away are not determined by any particular financial target or projected kitty requirement (I coudl afford to go now...), but by commitment to the proper raising of 2 children who are currently both teenagers, but who, though good kids, do not the desire tolive aboard. When they have both graduated from high school and are ensconced in reasonable emplyment, it will be time to go. I'm betting that will be not less than 4 years, not more than 6.
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Old 11-22-2006, 04:50 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Converted Post'
Originally posted by Weyalan

I posted on another cruising forum asking about costs of live-aboard crusing. I made a user poll where people could give their annual live-aboard budget. So far about 60 live-aboards have given their annual live-aboard cost/budget. The results are as follows:

$0-$10,000 13 (23%)

$10,000-$15,000 8 (14%)

$15,000-$20,000 6 (10%)

$20,000-$25,000 7 (12%)

$25,000-$35,000 7 (12%)

$35,000-$50,000 7 (12%)

$50,000-$100,000 6 (10%)

Over $100,000 3 (5%)

As you can see, there is a broad spread of budgets (just like in land-based life). Plenty of people are getting by on less than 10k per year. Some lucky blighters have over 100k per year, and a lot of people are somewhere in between. The bottom line seems to be that you can modify your live-aboard crusing lifestyle to suit your budget... sure it will involve some compromises, but "enough" money is what you decide is enough.
Hi Weylan,

Good luck on your plans!

I believe that the poll isn't effective since you do not know which size of of boat the voters have! There is a big difference in the cost of living aboard a 30ft boat to living on a 80ft boat!

Maybe you should think of which boat you are planning to live on and ask the people with a boat of a similar size to enter the poll (new one).

Just my 2 cents!

Hope to see you on the sea soon!
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Old 11-23-2006, 05:23 AM   #28
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Thanks yachtmaster81. I understand that the cost is going to be determined by the size(and type) of boat that you choose. However, my data was merely intended to illustrate that it was possible to live aboard with as big or small a budget as you could afford. i.e. that there are plenty of crusiers living aboard for less than $1000 per month.... sure, they probably aren't sailing 80 footers, but they are sialing something, they are out there and doing it... so, at the end of the day, it is a matter of compromising your lifestyle (and, if necessary, the size of your boat) to suit your budget, however much or little that budget might be.
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