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Old 04-09-2007, 07:47 AM   #15
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1) Battery monitor failed, a Link 2000R. As the regulator requires the battery monitor it wouldn't charge the batteries.

2) Batteries failed. See #1.

3) Both engine altenators failed. See #2.

4) Watermaker totally unacceptable water production. New watermaker.

5) Wind generator failed.

6) Feathering props failed in reverse.

7) Port engine transmission failed. See #6.

8) Water heater leaked.

9) Force 10 galley rebuild. See Jeanne's comments.

10) Dinghy outboard prop failed (rubber insert).

11) All hatches needed to be removed and resealed at the deck. All new gaskets for the frame.

12) All dock lines failed. Rarotonga surge broke them all.

I could continue for another 20 or 30 lines. Trampoline, spice rack, foot pump, lexan, sanitation hoses, etc. This is for THIS YEAR!
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Old 04-09-2007, 02:13 PM   #16
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Watermelon was 22 years old when we sold her, and one of the few things that never gave us trouble were the Goiot hatches. They never leaked a drop. Perhaps because they were dogged down with a screw mechanism. A bit more work to dog and open, but pretty tough to break or wear them out. We used to get annoyed with the difficulties of getting various French-produced parts, but although abuse and lots of wear wore out a few bits, I can't think of any Goiot hardware that failed from normal wear and tear.

Abuse and mistakes made by us or the previous owners, or bad luck, did cause some problems, but they were in the nature of damage, not normal wear and tear breakdowns. That includes the prop strut and the transmission (though the transmission was not particularly good from the day we installed it).

In all fairness to boats and their builders, most boat gear is a compromise between heftiness and space and weight-savings. There are probably some "bullet-proof" gear that isn't installed because of weight or size.
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Old 04-09-2007, 11:12 PM   #17
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We spent 5 yrs getting the boat 'ready' to go cruising as she was vintage 1985 when we bought her in 2000. We addressed the following during the period [and spent lots of boat units and time]

8/2000 New Main, New 140% Genoa, New Asymmetrical

8/2000 Replace All Standing and Running Rigging, All New Norseman Fittings, All New 1X19 Wire, Replace Steering Cables

8/2000 Replace Aft Holding tank with Lectrasan, Install new 30 gal. Holding tank Forward, Install Galvanic Isolator

Rebuild Rudder [remove skins, new foam, reseal], Install Spurs Cutter - Assembly C with 1 ½” Holding Block 3

Install PSS Dripless Shaft seal [stuffing box]

10/2000 New Max Prop 19” 3 blade uses 83mm zincs

3/2001 12v Supply side replacement

New Main Battery Bank –12 Rolls Batteries – 840 amp hours

New Vital 270 amp primary alternator

New Vital 135 amp secondary alternator

Install Link 2000R Regulator for primary

Install InCharge Regulator for engine start

Prosine 2.0 Inverter Charger

Replace Engine Exhaust Hose

Upgrade Windlass Circuit Breaker and remote

New Master Switches, Terminal strips, wire, etc. as necessary

4/2001 Repaired leaking fixed ports (all six)

9/2001 Replaced both throttle and shift cables

3/2002 New Handcraft Inner Spring Mattress for aft stateroom

9/2002 Replaced main DC motor on refrigeration, Replaced Condenser and control on Air-conditioning

9/2002 Completion of deck project - Removed teak decks, rebuild so ready for Alwgrip, Awlgrip topsides, deck, and mast, Install new teak decking in cockpit , Replace all deck hardware with Harken Black Magic cars and adjustable jib leads, Replace teak hand rails with stainless steel ones, New Wavestopper Hard Dodger with dual height Bimini

New Screens, New Hatch sun covers, New canvas for all other misc. items,

3/2003 Rework fuel system for primary diesel install, Dual - Racor filter set-up with ability to polish fuel from tank.

6/2003 New Simrad AP22 Autopilot with remote and new Raytheon Type 2 long linear drive, Upgrade B&G to include compass

11/2003 Rebuild Battcar system all new torlon bearings, Add Stainless bowsprit

5/2004 Peel Bottom for Blister repair – add 1 layer biaxle cloth and repair with Dow 8084 vinyl ester.

5/2004 Add Kato Voyager davits, Kato motor lift and reinforce transom to support, New Fisher Panda generator PMS 4200 Plus, Redo 2 closets to dressers and line with cedar, Add non-skid to “Bob deck”, Add Lewmar opening port over galley stove, Repair Refrigerator Box, Replace all dome lights

3/2005 New Interior Cushions Main Salon / Forward Pullman Double

3/2005 New Watermaker – Sea Recovery 300 gal/day not installing membrane so warranty does not begin until membrane installed

5/2005 Add new secondary anchors and rodes [Spade A140 & Fortress FX37]

8/2005 Install KISS Wind Generator on Pole, new #3 jib

3/2006 Update Engine - New raw water pump, hoses, heat exchanger, exhaust elbow, etc.

4/2006 Replaced refrigeration with new Sea Frost system

The above represented the significant stuff prior to taking off cruising for 'X' yrs. We left in June 2006 and before we got back to Annapolis in October on our way south, where we started from the following failed:

Generator - replaced under warranty - failed 2x

Battcar track screws needed to all be rebedded with locktite as a few vibrated out

snatch blocks blew up while flying the spinnaker

self tailer on one winch failed which required new parts

The above is in addition to normal wear and tear items that go with any boat. The message is no matter how much you prepare and think you have it all covered, something will not work when you expect it to.

Ah fixing boats.... where ever you are.
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Old 04-10-2007, 12:24 AM   #18
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I had a $5 water hose (between raw water pump & heat exchanger) break that almost sank my boat.

Lessons learned:

1) Cheapest parts can cause greatest damage.

2) Diesels engines can continue running when almost completely submerged.
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Old 04-10-2007, 03:49 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluh20 View Post
Start with the largest bank of high quality batteries that you can afford. I prefer AGM or Lifeline over all others for the crusing sailor (pass on any lead acid including 6 volts).
For long distance cruising purposes, I could put forth a VERY strong arguement why anything other than 6 Volt Lead Acid would be a mistake.

Could you share why you believe AGM is a better choice?
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Old 04-10-2007, 12:05 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trim50 View Post
For long distance cruising purposes, I could put forth a VERY strong arguement why anything other than 6 Volt Lead Acid would be a mistake.

Could you share why you believe AGM is a better choice?
I agree with the high quality lead acid comment...
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:06 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trim50 View Post
For long distance cruising purposes, I could put forth a VERY strong arguement why anything other than 6 Volt Lead Acid

would be a mistake
I agree that 6 volt lead acid are the ONLY way to go. I know of at least three boats that had Lifeline AGMs fail early based on charging problems.. either too little or too much. Lead acid are easier to measure for problems, and there are lots of books available about testing procedures. If you have a good charging system, they are pretty low maintenance. Just add water and clean the tops every so often.
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Old 04-11-2007, 12:21 PM   #22
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In the end everything will break down... Sun, salt and moving-all-the-time are serious killers.

That doesn't mean you have to go basic, just make sure you understand what you carry and to be able to live without.

And, the most important, keep it all very simple. Wire everything seperate, no more electronics then needed (for example: a watermaker only needs a on/off switch and a high-pressure valve: you can do without all other knobs and meters). Digital charts on notebook are OK, as long as you have back-up information available (pilots, (printed) paper charts) so that you can make landfall. Electrical autopilot is fine but doing a very important job and one that you definitly need: steering. So take a full spare or, even better, use a windvane self steering.

What 'big things' failed us during a 2 year circumnavigation:

- 2 brandnew oversized harken blocks (causing $1200 damage to railing and scepters )

- Simpson & Lawrence (now Lewmar) anchorwinch (old, but hardly used) no more parts available after Lewmar bought the company...

- engine rawwater pump (amidst shipping lane T in the red sea, with 0 knots of wind...). Spare took only 5 days to arrive in Massawa Eritrea (send from Holland with dhl).

- compass (!!!) of raymarine autopilot: no course keeping after that....)

- Furlex forestay roller (able to temp fix to reach trinidad)

- lot of small parts, blocks and lines, due to wearing and tearing.

Just be prepared. Carry spares for the most important parts or be able to repair them (or do without) and make sure you stay in touch with others. Remember, there is hardly a place on earth where there are no other cruisers and/or a fedex/dhl agencies for help and supplies!!! We helped a lot of other cruisers and were helped by others.

Jan
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Old 12-11-2008, 01:38 PM   #23
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This is such an interesting, informative topic. Thank you.

Any more system/equipment failures?
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Old 12-12-2008, 02:48 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trim50 View Post
I had a $5 water hose (between raw water pump & heat exchanger) break that almost sank my boat.

Lessons learned:

1) Cheapest parts can cause greatest damage.

2) Diesels engines can continue running when almost completely submerged.
First response:



Follow up response:

On boats, regarding hoses, o-rings, belts, other little stuff...folks are frequently penny wise and pound foolish (e.g. "I'll fix it if it breaks") or the opposite--throw money at the big things without understanding if the dollars spent are really increasing performance and/or safety and reliability of the boat but yet overlook these little important items. True too often, the money for routine maintenance just isn't there and folks justify to themselves that they'll be able to deal with a problem if/when it happens. Its a fine line for each of us to know what "needs" to be replaced and what is just throwing money at the boat in fear of something breaking.

Both David and I are, umm....well, "hard on things" puts it lightly. We expect things to perform. Once, we took a nice 35mm camera into a shop for repair to the shutter. It was a three year old camera that had seen many spelunking trips, canoe trips, sailing trips, and it was pretty grungy of course. When a friend of mine and I went to pick it up, the repair guy asked what it had "been through" ... my friend, who knows David and I so well, quickly chirped in that "her husband is the kind of guy who feels like you should be able to throw the camera on the ground, stomp on it, pick it up and have it work perfectly"

We do have a philosophy that when something breaks--we seriously consider whether it is needed, if it is designed to the rigors of what we're doing with it, if a simpler, cheaper solution will be more reliable--or if we need to beef something up or get rid of it because realistically we cannot maintain it in the harsh environment we're likely to use it in.

Still in the boatyard, so can't tell you what broke "out there" but looking forward to finding out soon
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