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Old 03-24-2006, 06:39 AM   #1
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Default HARD KNOTS GREAT VOYAGE 2005 ACCOUNT UP.

Well I got it finished today. I hurt my back at work and came home early and was able to finish typing it up. Enjoy. This was the account of my failed attempt to sail from Long Beach to Hawaii and back in March of 2005 for those of you who are new.

http://members.cox.net/newport20centre/htm...led_voyage.html

-Robin
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Old 03-25-2006, 01:28 PM   #2
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The response to the Account of the Voyage of 2005 has been surprising. I did proof read it tonight after I took the Percaset and did some corrections.. no one said anything but I was embarressed after I read it. I'll also be adding some pictures I took with my 35mm this weekend or tonight if I'm up.. I actually got a few good ones of Dolphins leaping from the water.. You'll see Lava the cat's ears and the top of his head in the foreground so this proves we did do this.. also Catalina is clearly obvious in the background.

Robin
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Old 03-27-2006, 12:17 PM   #3
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Admiral,

I'm certainly no expert and I hope I'm not being too critical, but...

I've just read through your account, twice, in an attempt to gather where you are coming from... and where you may be heading.

You seem to blame others for all of your misfortunes and I believe you are an absolute fool.

Worse than that - you are a fool with a gun... and thus a danger to society.

Sincerely,

Kirk
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Old 03-27-2006, 09:53 PM   #4
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Robin

It is obvious that your dreams are far greater than your capabilities.

I'd stick to sailing on the local lake, its safer for you and anyone who may have to come to the rescue.

If I were Brian I wouldn't be happy to be critised in such a way after driving you all the way from your home base to California and then back again. Not the way to thank a friend who has gone to a lot of trouble for you. I hope for your sake that he hasn't read your web page or he might not be so ready to lend a hand in future or remain as a friend either.

Regards

David
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Old 03-28-2006, 04:35 AM   #5
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Hi Robin,

We should be kind to people we meet when travelling outward along the road, for we are sure to meet them again when making our return. I wonder what the cat thinks. I am sure Brian is at the limit of his patience. I urge you to keep sailing for its side effects include independence, tolerence, perhaps a degree of wisdom, and the ability to confront life with a smile and a kind word.

Best wishes

David
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Old 03-28-2006, 07:16 AM   #6
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This all happened 9 months ago, further more I am not a fool and had plenty of expert advice regarding the trip. In addition, Brian and I are still very close friends. Lava is fine. He has always been a traveling cat and does from time to time get motion sickness. The reason for my posting the account is that there were a lot of people following my progress last year and they all wondered what happened to me. I travel a lot around the country and abroad for various reasons, the chief being that I enjoy meeting new people. My goal to sail across an ocean is something I've always wanted to do, and when I'm old and retired I will probably be enduring what my father is enduring now, muscular dystrophy, which will make such efforts impossible. Six months ago Brian and I began construction of a 40 foot Spray 38 steel hulled ketch, which, withall luck, will be completed in three years. This vessel, it is my fond hope, will be a boat that can easily complete such a trip. For now Hard Knots is retired to lake sailing and perhaps the occasional trip to Catalina Island, but her days of serious sailing are over. So you can call my dreams escapist, foolish, beyond my capabilities, but I will assure all of you that they will be successful in the end.

-Robin

-Robin
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Old 03-28-2006, 06:03 PM   #7
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Dear Robin

A few words from someone who has followed your postings and the build up to your voyage eagerly.

Firstly, an endeavour is never incomplete till you abandon it or till you admit defeat. So perhaps it pays to think of your voyage as postponed.

Secondly, an incomplete adventure often has more learnings than a complete one. And even the worst experience carries some weightage if one has learnt from it and departs the richer for wisdom.

And lastly an observation, its sad that people would rather call you a fool than offer advice that one could observe or act upon. the decision to carry a firearm is entirely a personal one and there are enough discussion of this on the site.

Yes, several members were rather alarmed at your sudden disappearance.

IMHO, sailing is a journey that never ends. with each voyage you learn something. with each learning you are equipped to venture further and further offshore. it is important not to venture too much further than one's experience permits. one can learn a lot by working in a team and a co-workers efforts are worth as much as your trust in him - if you'd rather do it yourself 'cos you don't trust his workmanship, then please go ahead.

wishing you all the very best for your future adventures. and do keep us posted.

fair wind

chetan
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Old 03-28-2006, 10:03 PM   #8
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Robin

I'm glad that you are building a new boat which will be much more suitable for what you want to do. Hardknots seemed to be too light and a trailer sailer isn't ideal for an ocean passage. The size of the boat isn't wrong, I crossed the Atlantic in a 24 ft boat, but it needs to be a good seaboat which can take the weather and in which you have complete confidence 24 hours a day.

In the meanwhile you must get some sea time in with experienced skippers so that you can learn from them and pick their brains. A lot of preparation is needed before going trans-ocean and using others' experience can be of enormous benefit. Of course all sailors have their own ideas of how to run their own boats but if you have several opinions you can adapt them to your own needs.

Above all get out to sea - its the only way that you can get a feel for it and prepare yourself for your own adventures. Living in a small boat for many days at a time, whether with a crew or on your own is not for everyone but you will not know that until you get out there on the ocean. Use last year's abortive attempt as part of the learning curve and the experience is not wasted.

Regards

David
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Old 03-29-2006, 03:11 PM   #9
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Hi Robin,

Whilst I am obliged to point out that you appear to have been ill prepared for the voyage let me also give you two of my favourite quotations,

"Sailboats are safe in a harbor. But that's not what boats were made for"

and

"Good judgment comes from experience. Unfortunately, much of that comes from bad judgment."

So the bottom line is do as Robert the Bruce's spider - try and try again until you succeed. Use your increased good judgement to make a new and better prepared endeavour.

As soon as we put to sea, be it in a small yacht or a mighty battleship we are taking risks. The knack is to minimise those risks.

Good luck with the new boat.

Stephen

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Old 03-29-2006, 10:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Converted Post'
Originally posted by Nausikaa

"Good judgment comes from experience. Unfortunately, much of that comes from bad judgment."
That should be the quote of the day right there.

Robin, I echo David and Chetan's remarks and just want to add that a boat even 4 feet bigger is enormously different and especially in the range in the 30's or under.

While I wouldn't take a 20' to Hawaii (even though I know it's been done before), I would take a 27', but nothing less.

The other thing to consider about a bigger boat is that you probably wont have a temperamental outboard, but an inboard that will also charge your batteries, perhaps even able to hand crank start it in dire needs and if you get one with a tiller, you won't have lost the expense of the at-1000 and you can transfer the fixed mount vhf radio over as-well if needed.

Just my 2cents, but you sound determined and where this a will, there is a way.
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Old 03-31-2006, 10:35 AM   #11
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I read your report, and my main thought was: I hope this 'sailor' never gets out of US territory!

You seems to be more into guns and firearmes than sailing and semanship.

But tecnically, the main reason for the failure of your trip seems to be overload. Size of the boat is not relevant in general, but the load capacity of the boat. Reinforcing some parts as rigging etc does not encrease your load capacity and stability. It may prevent your mast from going overboard, however if it does it may bring the deck with it!
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Old 04-02-2006, 03:58 AM   #12
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I don't understand these comments about Robin being "more into guns and firearms " than seamanship. Please explain why this seems to be, since the ONLY time he mentions a fire arm is when he chased someone off the boat in the middle of the night, who the police subsequently arrested. Sounds like he acted quite properly to me- he didn't after all SHOOT the guy, just held him til the police arrived.

Robin- sounds to me like you learned some hard lessons. Thanks for baring all that so the rest of us perhaps will learn something. I'm glad though that you didn't get far offshore in the boat, because it sounds as if she was seriously over loaded.

Don't give up though, just try it again, in a different boat perhaps. After all Chubby made it and she was a 19 foot Potter. Although I'd prefer my Rhodes Meridian 25 over that boat.

Maybe you can do some cruising in the Sea Of Cortez and you won't feel the need for so much stores aboard.
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Old 04-02-2006, 05:35 AM   #13
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Thank you for all of your comments, both those that were positive, and those that were negative. I will be frank that the account was written in haste over a week ago, and I focussed on the negative points of a failed voyage because in my opinion it makes it more entertaining to the people that I know who follow my trips, whether they be by road, rail or sea. If you want a detailed log, I'd have to find my logbook which I have temporarily mis-placed, and then I could give you everything from the weather observations to minute by minute course corrections and sheet adjustments, but I didn't think it mattered.

As far as being more interested in firearms that seamanship, that's not true either. I was irritated by the rust forming on the Swiss Rifle and I threw it overboard rather than maintain it in the San Pedro Channel, and the pistol in the account was pawned for money to by two cans of topping paint and a new package of cotter pins and rings.

-Robin
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Old 04-02-2006, 10:55 AM   #14
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Where ever Your guns ended is of no importance, but they where obviously of such an importance that You even felt it needed onboard an allready overloaded boat (ref inventory list) on a 'domestic' cruise. Not to forget the other incident.

Most yachters I have met goes on the trips to explore new countries and cultures, and they want to put behind stress or whatever problems back home. They do not bring it with them, they want to get away from it. If You feel so unsecure in Your home country that You have to replace Your Teddy with a gun, not my problem! Howvever if You feel so unsecure on the open seas that You need a gun ther too, Your focus is on the wrong spot.

Most of the countries around the world welcomes yachters and have reasonable simple routines for entering, but common for all is NO GUNS! If guns were to be a common part of the yacht inventory list I am afraid this attitude will change.

The only contry that makes an un planned drop by difficult not to mention expencive is to my experience actually the US.

The only yachts I have met on my way that openly admit they carry guns have been US yachts!

The only waters I have felt threatend has been the US waters when hailed by a Coast Gard cutter outside Puerto Rico, guns everywhere!

Even in Jamaica the Coast Guard politely left their guns ashore on my request before inspection!

So if You cannot live without Your guns, please stay home. If You want to feel free, safe and welcome, leave Your guns at homee, relax and go cruising!

You may get some tips and hints at my web page:

http://www.geocities.com/haffiman37
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