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Old 08-28-2012, 02:25 AM   #29
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Regarding the bucket: Camping shops sell an arrangement which uses a toilet seat on a foldable frame. It is easy to store, comfortable and, the true benefit is that the receptacle is a biodegradable plastic bag. So, even in a marina, the toilet can be used, the bag removed and sealed and can then be taken to the marina's toilets for disposal. It's an ideal solution for after hours pooping for those without a holding tank.

As far as holding tanks go, I agree they are a less than ideal situation and sooner or later I had planned on the composting dunny as described by Bopeep. However as the new boat is fitted with a brand new Lavac, that will not occur for some long time.

Refrigeration simplicity. Again the new craft is fitted with a 12v Adler Barbour system. I won't change it, but I do prefer the engine driven compressor and eutectic tank arrangement. 20 minutes of engine each day (makes hot water, keeps the freezer at -17c) keeps everything rock solid and, with a spill valve into a small cold box, keeping perishables such as dairy products fresh isn't a problem.

The simple versus complex is, as Bopeep says, not necessarily a low cost exercise. Keeping a car in a garage and driving it to work everyday is a totally different arrangement to a horse and cart. But, space to keep the horse, keeping the horse fed, healthy, clean and the environment poo free; along with maintenance on the cart requires a depth of committment which would phase the average motorist.

Bopeep. In an earlier post you wrote of your compressor. Is it a dedicated dive compressor or is it a motor parts store 'cheapie', that can be attached to a regulator? I always had a dive tank with a 30' hose so I could dive on the boat but not have to bother with hauling the tank about. Nowadays In Oz particularly, a tank fill is a hideous cost and the cost of recertifying the tank every 12 months is plain extortion.
The idea of a small reasonably priced compressor on board seems ideal. Whats the biz?
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Old 08-28-2012, 02:55 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbopeep View Post
If you put in inflation, that $500/mo would be somewhere between $12K and $18K per year these days.
If it's calculated in terms of renting in Sydney, the Pardeys' $500/month budget now translates into $4000/month or $48k/year.

In 1978 I earned $18.5k and my highest ever income in the same industry - a mere two years ago - was $42k. Inflation happens.

Sure, there are people out there earning $150k+ in high tech industries. I'm not one of them, and the only people I know personally who are have double degrees and were lucky enough to get into contracting on large, stable projects at management level.

Technicians are a drug on the market in Australia. We have a government that simply leaves the floodgates open to skilled people from Europe and Asia, while meanwhile the whole industry gradually shifted to China in the late '80s.

Rob
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Old 08-28-2012, 03:01 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auzzee View Post
Regarding the bucket: Camping shops sell an arrangement which uses a toilet seat on a foldable frame. It is easy to store, comfortable and, the true benefit is that the receptacle is a biodegradable plastic bag. So, even in a marina, the toilet can be used, the bag removed and sealed and can then be taken to the marina's toilets for disposal. It's an ideal solution for after hours pooping for those without a holding tank.
Like this?



That's what I'd call a bucket! Wouldn't literally use a simple plastic laundry bucket, too easy to tip it over.

Rob
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Old 08-28-2012, 04:54 AM   #32
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No, more like this: Mitchells Camping, Outdoors, Military Surplus and Disposals | Online Shop
Unfortunately I can't dig this photo out of its attached page, but it will give you an idea of what I mean. (The one at $39.95)
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:46 AM   #33
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Oh right. Naah, I wouldn't touch that one. Besides I don't like the idea of trying to find a place where it would be appropriate to dispose of turds in a plastic bag.

The one I pictured can be found for $99 in some camping stores, and I've seen them on eBay too. Simply unclip the lower section and empty it ashore into a regular toilet, then give it a flush out.

I plan to get one for use at my mooring, since it's illegal to operate the straight-though head within Sydney Harbour.

Rob
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Old 08-28-2012, 06:03 AM   #34
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Here's another possibility, the "Thunder Down Under". $39.95 retail, biodegradable liner bags available.

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Old 08-28-2012, 06:18 AM   #35
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This 30' ferro yacht based in Brisbane just sold on eBay for $2,650 ... the bargains are out there.

Yacht / Sailboat Hartley Sloop Boat For Sale | eBay

Looks like it might be Hartley Tasman / Tahitian 30.
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Old 08-28-2012, 06:24 AM   #36
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A true dive compressor must be able to provide a very high pressure. That pressure is then lowered (as all you divers know) down to about 150 psi with the first stage regulator on a dive tank or the end of a hookah hose hooked up to another type of compressor. In our case, we use an oilless Porter Cable construction compressor which has a max pressure of 150 psi but typically we run it at 110 psi when cleaning the boat. You'd have to have the 150 psi if you were diving very deep on your anchor or something. In any case, a good quality oilless compressor with a couple gallon tank is minimum. We also happen to have a (maybe 5 gallon) portable gallon tank that we happened to already own--we can use it for a quick dive to check on something w/o running the compressor. The hose must be one suitable for breathing and you'll get a filter to pull out water so you're not breathing it--yuck. There are companies that sell entire hookah diving systems but we had the SCUBA stuff and the compressor so all we had to do was purchase a little harness to wear which you attach your regulator to and the proper fittings and hose. There are regular Hookah (low pressure) regulators out there but they're not necessary unless you're going to use a lower pressure compressor. Moderator JeanneP has some stories about doing that as I recall.

Other uses for a compressor--as an aside--We used a different compressor (with larger tank) extensively with air tools when doing the boat's rebuild and we thus have lots of air tools aboard. We do use them from time to time on various projects but you really don't need air tools aboard the boat if you're not an automotive hobbiest or someone who just can't live without tinkering.
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Old 08-29-2012, 04:55 AM   #37
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I'm not bad at swimming under water (at least as a kid I could do it, don't know about these days!) so free diving will probably work. Might just get some flippers and goggles, and maybe a cheap wetsuit for colder waters.

A compressor would be useful in the long term but I can do without it. Certainly not on my priority list right now.
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Old 08-29-2012, 06:30 AM   #38
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Haiqu--Ya always say "I'll make do..." on que. LOL. We've done a lot of "making do" and it's a good trait to have the ability to skip the extras and go for the basics for the task needed.

I have to laugh about the compressor thing--in clear, warm, tropical water, mask and a snorkel is all that may be needed to clean the hull or dive on the anchor to make sure it's set properly. Give a bit of cold water, or murky water, or currents, or all three--then things start taking longer and longer down there. If you've ever dived with a hookah you'd love how much nicer it is than using a tank. If you've ever had to lug your tank in the dingy and haul it around finding a place to fill it, you'll start looking lovingly at the little oilless construction compressors. LOL.

You'll be able to make realistic decisions about what you need or don't need once you start sailing your boat and going places. Things happen and you'll figure out quickly what is needed to keep things going. What we've seen of the successful folks who want to cruise and make it happen is that they are those folks who adapt and work with things--changing the plan and getting more stuff or getting rid of stuff--until it's all a very efficient set up working well for their voyaging life.

There are a couple types of folks who don't ever make it out of the harbor: folks who either have way too high of expectations of what they need --so they can never really get it together and sail anywhere, or those who think they can make do with very little and then can't get those things working together sufficiently to ever go anywhere either. The rest of the folks--those who manage to get out and cruise--they're the ones who know how to evolve and make it happen.

Just getting the boat moving is a major step and the first simple step on the path to getting on with cruising--and how simple is simple? Do you and the boat have what it takes to sail out of the harbor? That's the first--and most important-- part for all cruisers. Get the boat moving--whether its with a motor to start off because you don't yet know how to sail or whether it's taking the plunge and sailing everywhere because using a motor is against your religion--get moving and you'll quickly learn what's REALLY needed--and it will likely be pretty simple.

Fair winds,
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Old 08-29-2012, 11:28 AM   #39
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Well one thing is for sure, it won't be SCUBA gear for me. My brothers were both into that when they were younger but gaining the certification and having to get tanks filled by someone else is too much of a hassle.

And yeah, point taken. I need to get back to Sydney and do some actual sailing. Been up here in Brisbane lately due to my father being ill, he passed on a couple of weeks back.
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