Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > General Cruising Forum
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-22-2007, 07:48 AM   #1
Admiral
 
atavist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Vessel Name: Persevate
Posts: 548
Send a message via Yahoo to atavist
Default Hunting

I'm not trying to start another "guns on boats" arguement. But what I am interested in knowing is if anybody has any good experiences hunting in different places that their sailing journeys have taken them that they would care to share. I know this is probably not too likey as a lot of places don't allow guns at all and aren't going to let you go hunting but I would imagine that there are plenty of uninhabited islands with lots of wild boar or different game animals that people might take advantage of when passing by.
__________________

__________________
atavist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2007, 08:43 AM   #2
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

In general, "wild boar" on islands of the S. Pacific are domestic pigs gone feral. In French Polynesia most islands wet enough to support feral pigs are also inhabited, though if you get acquainted with the French weathermen on Mangareva, for example, you will make friends by providing bullets to them. (The French limit the amount of ammunition its citizens can buy, and on Mangareva, for example, they like .22 for killing the wild chickens in the trees, shotgun shells for killing cows.

On many islands in the Caribbean and the S. Pacific, animals were left off the boats to run wild and breed so that the crew of the next explorer, trading, or whaling ship to pass by could go ashore and get some fresh meat.

In the Caribbean, it was goats, but I don't think there are many uninhabited islands - Dog Island off Anguilla is, and you might not get into trouble going there, but if you are caught, you'll be sorry. I believe you can check in at Road Bay, Anguilla and get permission to go to Dog Island, but I wouldn't tell anyone I had a gun and was planning to use it there. I would also check first to be sure it is still uninhabited. The French used to love to shoot doves, or anything else that moved on the small cays, but I never saw it when we were last cruising there 15 years ago.

On Cocos Island off the coast of Costa Rica, and in many of the Solomon Islands, wild pigs are a nuisance and damaging to their gardens and the wild flora. But again, the bigger islands is where the pigs are, and those are also where the people are. I think that we, and two other boats anchored with us, were the last of the boats that didn't have to pay to stay there, and the two Guardia Costal had no problem loaning us their gun to go hunt pigs. But it wasn't easy! You had to go at night and wait for them to come by at sunrise. And since Costa Rica now charges for boats to anchor there, and there are a few extra rangers (or whatever they're called), I don't think there's any of the freedom we had when we were there.

In Tonga there are uninhabited islands with pigs, but they belong to somebody so I don't think it would be wise to shoot them.

A lot of words to say "I don't think so", I know, but sometimes I like to indulge my memories.
__________________

__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2007, 01:07 PM   #3
Commander
 
Spike_dawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 145
Default

A fishing rod will provide better fare which is also better for you.

You can't visit any islands without first checking into the country. Means your firearm is in a customs office. As Jeanne mentioned...uninhabited does not mean unowned. You maybe taking livestock which is important to a village survival, several islands away.
__________________
Spike_dawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2007, 07:47 PM   #4
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

Thanks, Spike. I sometimes get so involved in my reminiscing I lose a bit of the thread. That was a very good addition to my post.
__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 01:44 AM   #5
Admiral
 
atavist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Vessel Name: Persevate
Posts: 548
Send a message via Yahoo to atavist
Default

You know it really is a shame just how small the world has gotten. You can't do anything these days without stepping on someone elses toes or breaking a rule somewhere.
__________________
atavist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 06:06 AM   #6
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,727
Default

Hi Atavist. Your above post is one of the main motivations for people like us to cut the dock lines, chuck a moon at the boss and 'burger' off across the horizon....and, on a cruising yacht there just isn't room for all those useless, 'timesaving' appliances you keep in the kitchen cupboard at home on the land.
__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 06:39 AM   #7
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Converted Post'
You can't do anything these days without stepping on someone elses toes or breaking a rule somewhere.
I guess that this world has gotten quite a bit smaller, and it's easier to bump up against another culture's traditions and beliefs. I figure that in my own home I should be free to conduct myself as I see fit, provided, of course, that my behavior doesn't injure or inconvenience somebody else (I can't perform human sacrifices, for example). So I figure that I should extend that privilege to others in their homes as well.

I've heard lots of cruisers complain that they should have the right to anchor wherever they want in a foreign country. I've even heard discussions over the VHF radio between several US boats discussing what measures they were going to take to protest a South Pacific island chief's requiring that they pay an anchoring fee. As if they had some special right to trespass on his island. I've been told by some cruisers that they will never allow a local islander to touch their boat - they stand at the stern telling the island children who are so curious to see these foreigners "go away. Don't touch my boat." I was speechless the first time I was told this by a fellow cruiser, and I thought that they were just really odd. But I've heard it several times since then, and I remain amazed by their cheek. But...

If you own a home, what would you think if some out of state RVer pull into your driveway and parked his RV there for the next several days? Put his trash on your lawn or in your refuse can, use your water faucet to fill his water tanks, dump his holding tank into the sewer grate down the street a ways. Without asking permission, and standing behind the door yelling "go away, don't touch my property" when you knock on the door to find out who this person is. I would think that the RVer was stepping on toes, big time.

Or another example, closer to my own experiences. An avid hunter, you travel to (Montana, Wyoming, Pennsylvania...) to hunt (elk, mountain sheep, white tail deer....). When you climb the fence into the huge (miles huge) ranch or farm or orchard, what is the first thing you do? I hope it's to find the owner of the property and ask permission to hunt his land. That's what the rules of our civilization ask that you do.

Yet some cruisers think they have a right to park anywhere, forage anywhere, take whatever they see growing "wild" along the path; and they forget that they are the visitors, not invited guests; though I don't know how many invited guests would behave that way, either.

The trouble with cruisers from most of the developed world is that often they carry a very distorted view of many of the more undeveloped, sometimes primitive, regions. Perhaps the most difficult concept is private property as we Western cultures view it, and as other cultures, particularly island nations, see it.

For example, the San Blas Islands of Panama, or most of the S. Pacific islands. Every coconut is owned by someone, and every coconut has a value to them. Going ashore and taking a coconut without asking is no different than climbing a fence to go into the Vermont apple orchard and picking the farmer's apples. The islanders don't need fences because everybody in their culture knows the rules. Everybody in the US knows the rules in their area, too. And for as long as people have gathered together to form cooperative communities there have been rules. Most of the time we're not stepping on our neighbor's toes because we know the rules, and respect them. It's the people who want the rules to be the same no matter where they are who start bumping up against a different reality and thus different rules.

I'm thankful that the world has not become so homogenized or westernized that everything is the same everywhere. It would be easier sometimes if things weren't quite SO different, perhaps, but I like the chance to look at things differently. It requires that we take the time to learn more about the culture we find ourselves in, and perhaps step very lightly until we know for sure that what we do is acceptable, or at least not offensive. Forums such as this one are one small part of the acculturation process.

It really is easy to step on somebody's toes as we wander so far from home, and we are all probably going to do it now and then no matter how well-meaning we may be. That's part of the human condition, I guess.

This is my hobby horse. I am not saying that I think that any of the contributors to this forum behave that way, but having seen it in our travels, this particular topic seemed to be the appropriate forum for my venting. Forgive my rant.

Fair winds
__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2007, 08:15 AM   #8
Admiral
 
atavist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Vessel Name: Persevate
Posts: 548
Send a message via Yahoo to atavist
Default

JeanneP, I totally agree with everything you said. I've already done quite a bit of travelling and always try my best to respect other cultures and their ways... I guess I was just hoping that there might still be a part of the world where governments and beurocracies hadn't taken over and the land was still no mans property, sort of like america before we took over. I guess that's just a pipe dream though.
__________________
atavist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 01:59 PM   #9
Admiral
 
atavist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Vessel Name: Persevate
Posts: 548
Send a message via Yahoo to atavist
Default

Ok this post is pretty silly but it just goes to show I have WAY too much time on my hands.... but by Jove I think I've got it.... can you say slingshot... I can't imagine that a slingshot would be illegal anywhere in the world and with some of the ones they have these days if you use a good size pellet it would be a sinch for bringing down small game (rabbits, squirrels, birds) and since those animals aren't domestic it shouldn't encroach on anyones agricultural efforts.

alright... now this is the part where you tell me that having a slingshot onboard is considered arms trafficing somewhere...
__________________
“The world turns aside to let any man pass who knows where he is going.” (Epictetus 55 - 135 AD)

"To see new things, and live day to day, is better than wine or poppy, and fitter for a man." (Theseus)
atavist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 10:00 PM   #10
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,727
Default

You guessed it Atavist.

A slingshot is, in a great many countries, classed as a dangerous and concealable weapon with more potential to harm than a knife. Some slingshots can hurl a large, marble sized ball with more impact over a given surface area than a .22 rifle.

In Australia it is classed as a controlled weapon and depending on the state, may be outlawed.

Tom Sawyer would be in hellish'n bad trouble, Injun Joe!

David.
__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2007, 11:54 PM   #11
Kuapaa
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Aloha Atavist,

I'll pass along "It's what I think, not what I know." But as of the last time I was home in Hawai'i (on the Big Island), you could pig hunt to your heart's delight, and you'd be cheered. Some guys actually make a living doing this, as wild boar are hated by most of us for the damage they do to our 'aina' (land)... incredible what these nasty buggers can do to a piece of pristine rainforest. And the same holds true for goats, especially on Kaua'i. Check with Hawai'i gov. and I think you'll be welcomed with lots of aloha. I'd even be willing to contribute to a public 'bounty' fund for every one of these animals killed.

John K.

P.S. We still don't have snakes, and until about 200 years ago had no mosquitos. But thanks to the whalers and their diseases... (guess I'd better not get off track).
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2007, 11:31 AM   #12
Rear Admiral
 
Harbor_Pilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 323
Default

Atavist,

The same is probably true with other devices capable of hurling a projectile, such as a bow and arrow, cross bows, or spear guns, in some countries.

Provided you are able to take the appropriate weapons with, and provided you find an acceptable location to hunt, and you find the desired, hogs, wild boar, warthogs, or razor backs, I offer a few more thoughts.

Some swine can grow to an immense size, around 1,000 lbs, half a ton. Of course the obvious choice is not to harvest something ridiculously large; something manageable, usable, either consumable or preserve-able. Of course you could share with the natives, or have a Hawaiian luau.

Pigs are noted for having a wide range of parasites and diseases that can be easily transmitted to humans, including trichinosis, cysticercosis, and brucellosis, and known to host large concentrations of parasitic ascarid worms. Proper cooking or curing is important. For this part, it probably does not matter how you acquired it; if you shot it, bartered for it, or bought it in the local market.

Most of the discussion has centered around hunting on seemingly remote islands, but continents offer hunting opportunities as well. In any case land transportation may be a factor and required to get to the hunting grounds and bring the harvest back to the boat. A lot of islands have a jungle like environment, and raised elevation going inland. Even if you harvest a hog, weighing say 45 kilos / 100 lbs, and after dressed out it, the usable / edible meat maybe will be half that or less, you have to transport it back to your sailing vessel, over what ever distance, in what ever terrain exists.

As far as I know ever US state offers many and great hunting opportunities, has a hunting season, and requires a hunting license, many of which are on a lottery system. The lottery system exists because more people want to hunt, than the various game management departments will issue licenses, as they have determined, would be wise game management practice. In other words, they do not want and will not allow a species to be hunted to extinction, or the point of it becoming an endangered species; therefore they establish quotas and limits. The various lotteries operate in a similar fashion. You pay up front, applying several months to a year in advance. A random drawing is held. Those chosen are issued a license. Those not chosen get their money back. In some cases a priority system exists; meaning if you were declined this year, and you reapply next year, you are awarded a priority status, likely being successful in the next drawing. Sometimes there is an excessive of available licenses (game animals), and a shortage of applicants (hunters), in which case a second or third drawing is announced for the upcoming season, OR, it becomes a cash sale, first come - first served, (walk in to the game management office or buy on-line), until the full quota is met.

Concerning the proper management of game, the quotas vary from year to year. The authorities will not allow over-hunting, but on the same note do not want an over-population either, based on the available supporting habitat, or available sustaining food - water - shelter - "living climate" per species. Many states are subdivided into game management areas, or "hunting units", or in the case of fishing, by each body of water. Generally the fees for a resident of each US state are less than that of a non-resident of the respective state. Residence criteria various from owning real estate in a state, having an established residence, being registered to vote, assigned military duties in that state, enrolled in college / university, paying taxes, gainfully employed, etc. and the like.

As with most things in life, in any given society, there are laws, rules, customs, and traditions which one must adhere to. As cruisers, or wanna-be cruisers, we each have a fairly good idea of what our own rules are and how they apply; but we often don't know what they at some destination over the horizon. That is what is helpful about discussion boards like Cruiser Log, we can share knowledge in advance.

My older brother turned his passion of hunting and fishing in to a full time guide business more than 12 years ago, and is a lobbyist on those issues, representing three organizations. This spring he bought an RV resort as a related side line. I could post his web site here as a reference; I will not considering the board "non-commercial" rules and status.

My younger brother operates the farm and ranch we grew up on and helped build. He provides some of the hunting land. As a sideline he raises some wild game, which he releases to the wild, as the species becomes mature enough to be self sufficient required for survival, (able to feed and defend themselves) assisting and replenishing the game harvested.

I operate a travel business. All three of us, hunt and fish, and are capable of processing, preserving and cooking the harvest. As I age, my desire to hunt has declined, and get much more enjoyment out of shooting wildlife with a camera than a gun.

Noteworthy is an observation by my older brother, "You can buy steak at the grocery store (food market) or eat lobster at a place of fine dining, for less money than hunting wild game, and it may taste better to".

....And my response, "Most of the female gender, usually do not get super-excited over hunting, but most would enjoy the evening at the fine dining establishment."

Best Wishes & Happy Hunting,

Jeff
__________________
When in doubt, do the right thing.

Harbor_Pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2007, 12:07 PM   #13
Rear Admiral
 
Harbor_Pilot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 323
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Harbor_Pilot View Post
Atavist,

The same is probably true with other devices capable of hurling a projectile, such as a bow and arrow, cross bows, or spear guns, in some countries.

Best Wishes & Happy Hunting,

Jeff
I know of no country that has a law against a catapult, but I could be wrong.....

There is a slight problem with the size, the lack of aiming sites, and they have problems hitting moving targets.....
__________________

__________________
When in doubt, do the right thing.

Harbor_Pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Whale and Dolphin hunting? imported_admin The Poop Deck 6 08-12-2004 05:35 PM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0