Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > General Cruising Forum
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-05-2007, 02:33 PM   #1
Retired Mod
 
Lighthouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Home Port: Durban
Posts: 2,984
Thumbs down

LINKY.

Comments posted here should be very informative.
__________________

__________________


The World Cruising & Sailing Wiki

Help to build this free, online World Cruising Guide.

"Built by cruisers, for cruisers''

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: Most sections
Lighthouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2007, 10:48 PM   #2
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,727
Default

I absolutely hate reading stories such as this....However, I recognise the value we can glean from lessons learned by others who find themselves in dire circumstances.

David.
__________________

__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-2007, 11:58 PM   #3
Admiral
 
MMNETSEA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,067
Default

No Doubt that a lot can be learnt from this excellent analysis of what went wrong, and was not done prior to leaving especially checking weather forecasts and certain vital components.

When scrutineering for offshore races from Hong Kong, one could be extremely unpopular when identifying faults, missing equipment etcc . I remember being in the very unpopular class when I disallowed the whole fleet of a new boat from Denmark, because the distance between the life-line stanchions exceeded the rule for the category of race.

Here is the link to the equipment, design requirements etc for yachts going offshore in category 1 races.

http://www.sailing.org/offshore/2002...at1Mo_Ver2.pdf

It could be argued that these rules and conditions would not apply to a cruising yacht - however, if you carefully go through them, one will find very little to argue with, especially in terms of the safety aspects. Probably the main difference will be that the Cruiser will carry more water, fuel and edibles - plus more tools and spares - because the cruiser's journey is greater. Also in recent years many cruisers have additional and more complex communication equipment.

Therefore, the rules set out for Category 1 offshore races could be used as a base-line for what is considered desirable for cruising the world's oceans.
__________________
MMNETSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2007, 04:00 AM   #4
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 80
Default

Lighthouse,

Thanks for the link, and thanks to the people who took the time to write up their experiences.

As a relative beginner, it is a lot less painful to learn from someone else's experience.

I had recently read Robinsvoyage's account in the archives of his problems sailing to Hawaii in 2005, which also had many lessons.

Put together, the lessons for me are:

* Before going on a major sea leg, load up your boat with its full expected weight and test it (& yourself) overnight in rough conditions.

* Physically test all your safety and back-up equipment.

* Vacuum packing sounds like the go.

* Get used to the idea of an anti-seasickness suppository as a last resort. Eeuugh!

* Don't try to be a hero. If there are cumulative problems, take the safe option.

* People can still enjoy their sailing, even if things break and you don't end up where you intended.

duckie
__________________
duckie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2007, 08:47 AM   #5
Admiral
 
Nausikaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Default

Indeed, this account really is valuable as a learning tool.

Also, the link provided by MMNETSEA is an excellent guide to the equipment which should be found onm a well equiped and seaworthy yacht. However, I believe that there are two elements adrift:

1. BASIC CONSTRUCTION

In the past, boats were constructed to meet the conditions expected. This was based upon experience and knowledge of the local conditions and resulted, for example in deep, heavy boats in northern waters. This changed as racing became increasingly popular and many boats were built to meet or rather capitalise on racing and class rules. They also, generally, had deep bilges. Weight was in many instances an important factor. Boats also became more complex and dependent upon "systems", technology and shore based support. This went against a couple of thousand years of development. As Kipling put it......

This new ship here is fitted according to the reported increase of knowledge among mankind. Namely, she is cumbered end to end, with bells and trumpets and clock and wires . . . she can call voices out of the air of the waters to con the ship while her crew sleep. But sleep Thou lightly. It has not yet been told to me that the Sea has ceased to be the Sea.

- Rudyard Kipling


Whilst all the systems technological advances have made life easier for us we have become, in many cases. too dependent upon them. The bottom line here is that boats deployed offshore and on ocean passages should be built for the sea and not to "racing rules" and that we should avoid total dependence upon technology which can fail. At worst, we should have a very high degree of redundancy concerning systems upon which we are dependent.

2. MAINTENANCE

It is not uncommon to read of gear failure. In some cases this is the fault of the manufacturer using either sub-standard materials or materials incompattable with the marine environment. In a significant number of cases it is due to a lack of maintenance. How many boats have deficiencies in their engine maintenance, or what is very common, have a well maintained engine but dirty fuel tank? How often are keel bolts, rudder posts and rudder bearings checked? How many boats have scrap in their bilges which can block bilge pumps? IMHO, lack of preventive maintenance accounts for many incidents.

Yes, I agree with all the comments made in the preceeding posts but please, for your own safety, ensure that your boat is capable of making the planned voyage and is well maintained.

And regarding seasickness, there is only one cure. I am not sure who devised this cure but it works:

Quote:
A sure cure for seasickness? Stand under a tree
Aye

Stephen
__________________
Yacht NAUSIKAA | Call Sign: 2AJH2




WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME?

www.nausikaa.org.uk

= Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania
Nausikaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2007, 12:25 PM   #6
Admiral
 
Nausikaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Default

On a more serious note, concerning seasickness it in not something I would wish upon anyone having suffered from it myself on the odd occasion.

As long a person who is viloently seasick does not have to perform any vital duty for the safety of the boat and is otherwise healthy there is no risk, just severe discomfort, providing the seasickness is not prolongued. If it is, then there is a major risk for dehydration. I am not the right person to instruct others on how to deal with this type of situation. Hopefully one of our members with medical competence will.

Aye,

Stephen
__________________
Yacht NAUSIKAA | Call Sign: 2AJH2




WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME?

www.nausikaa.org.uk

= Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania
Nausikaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2007, 11:20 PM   #7
Admiral
 
MMNETSEA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,067
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nausikaa View Post
On a more serious note, concerning seasickness it in not something I would wish upon anyone having suffered from it myself on the odd occasion.

As long a person who is viloently seasick does not have to perform any vital duty for the safety of the boat and is otherwise healthy there is no risk, just severe discomfort, providing the seasickness is not prolongued. If it is, then there is a major risk for dehydration. I am not the right person to instruct others on how to deal with this type of situation. Hopefully one of our members with medical competence will.

Aye,

Stephen
Preventing the onset of Sea Sickness is the target to aim for. In preparing for a long voyage where rough seas may be encountered, many cruisers advise a shake down trial of the boat before taking off into the wild blue yonder. For potential crew this is also the opportunity to get them conditioned to motion and for them to acquire their sealegs.

A number of travel sickness drugs are available ; some over the counter and some only on prescription. One particular drug is Cinnarizine, In the USA this drug is yet to be approved by the FDA - In Mexico it is available in high dosage tablets of 75 mg: this dosage is not recommended unless taken under medical supervision.

In the UK and in most European countries Cinnarizine is off prescription and is sold over the counter in the concentration of 15 mg per tablet.

-------------------------------------------

""Stugeron 15

Travel Sickness Tablets - information from My Pharmacy UK

Cinnarizine 15 mg per tablet

Effective prevention of travel sickness

Information for people taking Stugeron 15

Before you start to use your medicine, please read your own leaflet carefully all the way through as it contains important information. It does not contain the complete information about this medicine. If there is anything that you do not understand or if you need further information or advice, you should ask your pharmacist or doctor who will have more details.

This leaflet applies only to Stugeron 15 Please do not throw it away as you may need to refer to it again.

What is your medicine?

The name of your medicine is Stugeron 15 and its active ingredient is cinnarizine.

Each tablet contains: 15 mg of cinnarizine.

Other ingredients: Hydrous lactose, corn starch, sucrose, talc, magnesium stearate and povidone.

What should your medicine look like?

Stugeron 15 tablets are white, circular, with S/15 on one side and 'JANSSEN' on the reverse. Stugeron 15 is supplied to the pharmacist in packs of 15 tablets.

What type of medicine is Stugeron 15?

This is one of a group of medicines called antihistamines (anti-nauseant).

Product Licence holder: McNeil Ltd. Saunderton

High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, HP14 4HJ, UK

Manufactured by: Janssen Pharmaceutica NV

Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 , Beerse, Belgium

or

Manufactured by: Laboratoires Janssen SA

Campus de Maigremont, 27100 Val de Reuil, France

What is your medicine used for?

Stugeron 15 is used to control travel sickness

What you should know before you start your treatment

Before taking any medicine - always inform your doctor if you are pregnant, think you might be pregnant or are trying to become pregnant.

When not to use your medicine

Do not use Stugeron 15 if: You think you may have had an allergic reaction to Stugeron, cinnarizine or any of the inactive ingredients in the past.

An allergic reaction may be recognised as a rash, itching, swollen face or lips, or shortness of breath.

Inform your doctor or pharmacist before taking the medicine if the above applies to you.

Your doctor or pharmacist will then decide whether this medicine is suitable for you.

Special Precautions

Parkinson's disease: If you have Parkinson's disease ask your doctor, who will decide whether or not you can take Stugeron, as you may need to be more closely monitored.

Pregnancy: If you are pregnant, think you might be pregnant or are planning to become pregnant, ask your pharmacist or doctor before taking Stugeron 15.

Breast feeding: If you are breast feeding, do not take Stugeron 15.

Other medicines: Always tell your pharmacist if you are taking any other medicines because taking some medicines together can be harmful.

Taking Stugeron 15 with other medicines may make you feel more drowsy, such as those medicines taken for anxiety or to help you sleep (tranquillisers), certain pain killers and certain antidepressants. Only take Stugeron 15 with any of these medications if your doctor says that you can.

This medicine could affect your reaction to skin tests used to investigate allergies. If you have taken Stugeron 15 within the 4 days before the tests, you should tell your doctor.

Driving or operating machinery: Some people may feel drowsy after taking Stugeron 15. If you are affected in this way, you should not drive or operate machinery.

Alcohol: The combined effect of Stugeron 15 and alcohol may make you feel drowsy, therefore avoid alcohol while taking this medicine.

How to use your medicine

Whenever possible, Stugeron 15 should be taken after food to reduce the possibility of stomach irritation. The tablets may be sucked, chewed or swallowed whole with water.

How much should you take?

Adults and the elderly, and children over the age of 12:

Take 2 tablets two hours before travelling and 1 tablet every eight hours during the journey.

Children aged 5 - 12 years:

Take 1 tablet two hours before travelling and 1/2 tablet every eight hours during the journey.

What to do if you forget to take your medicine

If you forget to take Stugeron 15, do not take the missed dose, but take your next dose as usual and continue your course of medicine.

If you take too much of your medicine

If you, or anyone else, take more Stugeron 15 tablets than you were told to, contact a doctor or local hospital straight away.

If you think medicine makes you feel ill

The use of Stugeron 15 to control travel sickness is usually not associated with side effects. Those side effects that may occur are usually minor and short-lived, such as drowsiness or upset tummy. In rare cases, headache, dry mouth, increased sweating or allergic reactions may occur (see 'When not to use your medicine') which get better when treatment is stopped.

If your medicine affects you in any other way, you should tell your doctor or pharmacist.

How to store your medicine

As with all medicines, Stugeron 15 tablets should be kept in a safe place where children cannot reach them.

Store the tablets in their original container.

Do not use the tablets after the expiry date printed on the packaging and return any left over medicine to your pharmacist.

Further information

Hints on how to avoid travel sickness

The following hints may help you avoid travel sickness:

At sea

Where possible, stay on deck and keep your eyes on the horizon. Keep away from diesel and galley smells. Avoid rich and fatty foods. Dry Biscuits. Many sufferers find that being on the wheel assists by having to concentrate on the horizon

On the road

If possible, keep looking ahead into the distance. Travel in daylight and try to make sure that children can see forwards out of the windscreen. Avoid reading, and travel with a window open. Avoid rich and fatty foods.

Product Licence holder: McNeil Ltd. Saunderton

High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, HP14 4HJ, UK

Date of preparation of leaflet: December 2004

PL 13249/0021

This information has been taken from the patient information leaflet. Please read it carefully before using any product. If you are unsure about anything ask your pharmacist or doctor. Always use the information from your own product before using it, just in case there any differences from the information shown here. ""
__________________

__________________
MMNETSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
More Lessons To Learn About Cruising. Lighthouse General Cruising Forum 2 11-30-2007 01:00 PM
Sailing Into A Hurricane With Disastrous Results, Lessons Learned? JeanneP General Cruising Forum 11 11-27-2007 05:11 AM
What Have You Learned While Cruising? Lighthouse General Cruising Forum 8 09-26-2007 09:46 PM
Lessons Learned Don't Leave Port Without Them seanseamour General Cruising Forum 4 08-03-2007 03:23 AM
HELP: SAILING LESSONS??? eheart General Cruising Forum 7 02-06-2007 11:34 AM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0