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Old 12-28-2007, 11:22 AM   #15
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Good advice David.

I have also been told that putting the hand held GPS and laptop in a metal tin helps too. The tin becomes in effect a Farraday's cage and protects against electromagnetic surges.

In all my years at sea I have only once been in a vessel which was struck by lightning and that was off the coast of Liberia. It did not do much damage but the magnetic compasses went wild producing errors in the region of 70 degrees. The ship's magnetism was altered too which meant that we would really have had problems if we had not had a gyro compass. I agree that the chance of a lightning strike is not great. Far more likely that salt, damp and vibration will kill the laptop.

Aye // Stephen
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Old 12-28-2007, 11:35 AM   #16
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Hi Stephen, I have read accounts where mariners place their small portable 'back-up' gear such as the hand held GPS and VHF in the microwave. I understand it is such a contrivance as to make Mick Faraday a proud man.

For those concerned about charts...particularly electronic charts which come from other than reputable retail establishments...please check an old thread here http://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/index.php...stolen+software

Cheers

David.
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Old 12-30-2007, 10:41 PM   #17
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Hello Tom,

You have lots of good feed back on Charts and charting your way across the seas.

Now to cats :- Also check out Maxingout's topic of 25 Dec -- http://www.maxingout.com/storm_management.htm -- where Dave covers storms and gives good 1st hand info on Catamarans.

Your Quote:

"We are sold on Cats and are looking at Maine Cats, Dean 441, Island Spirits, Admiral and possibly Leopards and would appreciate any first hand problems with any of those. OR any other cats that you like."


As one multihuller giving a direction on what to look for in off-shore catamaran specifications :-

Look first and foremost at the height of the bridge deck above the sea when loaded to pay load capacity - this measurement taken from under the deck down to the sea surface. Also there should be no pods or nacelles or other structures hanging from the bridge deck between the hulls. Bridge decks that have a good clearance free of under-slung structures will provide better cruising speed, better tracking, less slamming, less headaches.

Another spec to look for is the width of the beam. In cats - the measurement taken at the widest point on the outside of the 2 hulls) in cats up to say 50ft LOA the beam will be close to a ratio of 2 : 1 , ie 25ft. (any wider beam may preclude lifting in most travel lifts) However, a wide beam allows for better stability.

While still on the subject of hulls - the modern cat will have vertical bows and the sterns will be sugar scoops with built in boarding steps, the aft ends will be out of the water when the boat is fully laden.

Rigging : look for cats that specify over-size stays and shrouds - avoid spreaders that set at 45 degrees aft of the mast. The mainsail track when curved at the same radius as the aft end of the boom will provide constant tension on the sail when moving from one tack to another.

Cutter rigged with inner-forestay close to the forestay allows wing to wing with sails close in size.

That's a start.

Richard
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Old 12-31-2007, 02:43 AM   #18
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Nausekaa:

I may agree that direct hits are rare, but 'too close' is another thing.

Singapore area is conciddered the 'worst'.

I got burned out once between Bali and Singapore, last year day before start of the Raja Muda regatta in Port Klang three of us 'lost' the wind indicator, and in the 2 years I've been living in Langkawi I have supplied another 3 wind indicators due to 'too close'. I guess it comes down a lot to sailing area. One thing I have noticed: all the affected ones have been the 'old' type Raymarine??? One thing I've done in all cases is to put a switch/plug on the wind indicator circuit to atleast prevent the instruments from burning out. The Sea Talk have its advantages, but also dangers.
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Old 12-31-2007, 04:27 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haffiman37 View Post
Nausekaa:

I may agree that direct hits are rare, but 'too close' is another thing.

Singapore area is conciddered the 'worst'.
The frequency of lightning strkes is not really an issue here. What we were looking at was the probability for a computer breakdown, whatever the reason; a lightning strike being just one of them.

Interestingly though, you wrote that the Singapore area is considered the worst. In my experience in Singapore and the Malacca Straits there was a lot of sheet lightning between clouds and not so much reaching earth. On the other hand, I have seen many more lightning strikes hitting the earth in Africa. But that is just my experience. Others may have differing perceptions.

But, getting back to the topic, the essential issue is that whilst plotting and GPS systems are fantastic aids to navigation they do rely on several, for the cruiser, uncontrollable components, i.e. the transmission of satellite signals, the supply of electricity, and the working of the device itself. When everything works then they are great. If any of these components goes south then you are in big trouble if lacking the primary navigational equipment of charts, magnetic compass, sextant, chronometer, nautical almanac and tables and the knowledge of how to use them.

Finaly, a word about chronometers. It took years before navigators were eventually given the tool they needed to accurately determine longitude at sea. Prior to the introduction of Harrison's marine chronometer (read the story of the chronometer - it is facinating) navigators had no istrument for accurately determining time, which is essential in determining longitude, unless using the very cumbersome and difficult method of lunar distances. Nowadays everybody is wearing a chronometer on their wrists. A cheap quartz watch is a far better timepiece than many a chronometer of 30 years ago. However, to be sure of the accuracy whichever timepiece you use, clock, watch, chronometer, deck watch etc, should be checked (to the second) and rated daily. As long as your GPS is working then you will be getting an extremely accurate time signal from the satellites it uses, otherwise the radio is the source of time signals. Further, my advice is to keep one clock/watch exclusively for navigation and set on GMT/UTC. If you are to use it for astro nav it will need a second hand or digital readout which includes seconds.

Aye // Stephen
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Old 01-01-2008, 02:35 PM   #20
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Thanks to you all for the great advice ...I like the way these posts take off in different directions . Any more advice ?? keep em coming

I remain

Tom In the Berkshires.

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Old 01-02-2008, 03:11 PM   #21
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There is a Privilege for sale next to me. If you I can get some information for you. The boat would probably be turnkey. The owner have moved ashore recently. I am near Jacksonville Fl..
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Old 01-03-2008, 11:10 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
There is a Privilege for sale next to me. If you I can get some information for you. The boat would probably be turnkey. The owner have moved ashore recently. I am near Jacksonville Fl..
If its not too much trouble , Let me know what he is asking and the year.........I know there is a Cat out there that will fit the bill, Just have to find it.....Thanks Again.....TOM
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Old 01-03-2008, 04:33 PM   #23
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Tom,

I will be glad to look into it for you..................
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Old 03-07-2008, 12:22 PM   #24
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Tom,

The best option if you must have one chart for the whole passage plan is probably Admiralty Chart 4400 - The West Indies. This Chart cover from Georgia down to Venezuela and all the East Coast of central America at a scale of 1:4,250,000. If you need more coverage, 4012 will give you the whole of the Eastern Seaboard from Canada to Rio at 1:10,000,000.

Regards,

Peter

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Old 03-07-2008, 02:12 PM   #25
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The more detailed the chart. The safer you are. That is why you will need LOTS OF CHARTS.......LOTS OF CHARTS...LOLOLOL
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Old 03-21-2008, 09:38 PM   #26
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im in LOVE with the Lagoon 440.

http://www.cata-lagoon.com
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