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Old 03-31-2014, 10:34 AM   #29
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I'm also a sufferer (hence the name!) and have tried Stugeron, Dramamine, Avamine, Scopolamine, wrist-bands (both pressure and electric), ginger, drinking water, not drinking water, drinking alcohol, not drinking alcohol, light breakfasts, fry-ups, steering or otherwise staying busy, going below and just about everything else you can think of. None of them work and most of the drugs send me to sleep. I once fell asleep at the wheel!
In my experience the only cure is to keep sailing. The experience doesn't have to be continuous: my relative acquired tolerance was built up over several years, but if you're on a long trip I should imagine you'll be OK after a few days.
Unfortunately I've been off the water for a couple of years so I shall have to start again :-(
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Old 03-31-2014, 11:21 AM   #30
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Sitting under a tree (species unspecified) was Nelson's idea; he was a suffrerer too (starting in the Solent at the age of 12). Never fails.
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Old 06-28-2014, 07:18 AM   #31
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A few more points:

If you feel sick, don't puke in the head. Heads can easily get clogged and they need to be kept clean and working for the other crew.

Take several gallon size ziplock plastic bags and keep them on you and handy when you feel the urge. They can also be sealed and washed out and reused if needed.

Best is to puke outside, over the LEE side, not the windward side! I hope the reason is obvious.

Fresh air helps most people. Make sure the boat has good ventilation if possible.

Diesel fumes nauseate most. Be careful and avoid fuel spills (common during the last minute rush to depart).

If possible, spend one or more nights on the boat prior to departure. Try to get your inner ear used to the motion on water, especially by sleeping on board. The ocean conditions may be much rougher, but I believe having your inner ear accustomed to some boat motion prior to the voyage will help prevent early onset sickness.

Stay busy or help run the boat, such taking a turn at the wheel or tiller or tending the sheets. Avoid reading or looking down at things like charts. Try to keep your head up, not looking down!

If you feel the urge to puke, let it happen. As unpleasant as it is, you might feel completely better in minutes as soon as you have.

Don't drink alcohol the night before your voyage, if you are concerned about getting seasick.

Avoid greasy foods.

Remember, the Admiral, Lord Nelson, the greatest hero of the British navy was prone and known to get seasick.
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Old 06-29-2014, 12:29 AM   #32
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And if you're going to barf, be sure not to lose your dentures.
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Old 06-29-2014, 10:02 AM   #33
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Agree with all of that. I always give my specs to someone to hold before I throw up. And CLIP ON!

But when I'm skippering and somewhat seasick I neglect the navigation - don't want to go below and get my head down over the chart - not that it's always necessary to do much of it if I'm in familiar waters. But somewhere new it could be dangerous.

Nelson never made it to Admiral - he died as a Vice-Admiral at Trafalgar.
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Old 06-29-2014, 10:12 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piotrek View Post
I've fotgotten about one more thing. Singing.

I mean it. Somehow deep breathing during singing songs and intellectual work on lirycs helps. I know, that's just my personal observation, nothing like NASA tests, but not very expensive to try.

Have fun.

Piotrek
Yes -singing helps as well. But then singing helps most things!
Sons of the Sea - complete with actions of course - is one of my favourites - and gets everybody moving and hence warm as well. As long as the helmsman doesn't participate too enthusiastically and the lookout keeps doing his job!
I might post the words some time...
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Old 06-29-2014, 02:13 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seasick Steve View Post
Agree with all of that. I always give my specs to someone to hold before I throw up. And CLIP ON!

But when I'm skippering and somewhat seasick I neglect the navigation - don't want to go below and get my head down over the chart - not that it's always necessary to do much of it if I'm in familiar waters. But somewhere new it could be dangerous.

Nelson never made it to Admiral - he died as a Vice-Admiral at Trafalgar.


It is always good advice to hold on, especially if ones head is over the lee side.

The glasses point is good too. I will add that to my own tips for future.

Also agree about the nav point you made. As I see it another good reason to have some kind of chart (such as a folded in clear waterproof case or photocopy etc) or display in cockpit for viewing with ones head up.

Also, thanks for adding the bit about Nelson, as I like some trivia like that.

As I recall Hornblower was also prone to mal de mare too.
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