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Old 02-29-2008, 11:30 PM   #1
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My nephew, first mate on a commercial fishing boat out of Florida, recommended this medication to his sister, who gets seasick when she glances at waves. After a week aboard a tall ship, she said she was the only student (or teacher) who didn't make an intimate connection with the lifelines when the wind piped up. According to these two, no drowsiness is associated with the drug, and it can be used even after symptoms begin.

I just wondered if anyone else has used it and to what effect? We're getting ready to take off sometime in the next two months (I can't believe it's really happening--finally!!!) and I want to be prepared.

Thanks,

Normandie
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Old 03-02-2008, 01:15 AM   #2
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How interesting. I did a Google search of Triptone, and it is another name for Dimenhydrinate, or more commonly, Dramamine.

http://www.drugdigest.org/DD/DVH/Uses/0,39...riptone,00.html

I assume, therefore, that different people react differently to it. I, for one, find Dramamine to be an exceptional sleeping pill, and is the only reason I ever took it, and then just once.

I guess you should try it before leaving to see how you react to it.
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Old 03-03-2008, 09:55 AM   #3
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I was watching an episode of Mythbusters and they tested a range of sea sickness cures including pressure straps, Ginger and prescription treatments. They found the best was Ginger. The prescription drugs worked but made them very sleepy. My wife uses Ginger and swears by it and guess what its natural.

Good luck
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Old 03-04-2008, 12:31 PM   #4
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I saw the same show, and I agree that ginger is an exceptional seasickness remedy, and also for car sickness, which my sister-in-law suffers from.

There are lots of easy ways to take ginger when not well.

Ginger Ale is easy, and keeps you hydrated at the same time. You can buy soda water and ginger concentrate and make your own gingerale. You can buy a seltzer siphon to make your own soda water, even better.

Crystallized ginger, usually in the spices department of the grocery store.

Gingersnap cookies. Yum!

caution. I am allergic to ginger. Perhaps others are and don't know it. Causes inflammation of the soft tissues in my mouth. Ginger and cinnamon allergies did not show up until I was an adult, and is probably due to excessive exposure to cinnamon oils in an "all natural" toothpaste I used. I therefore avoid ginger and cinnamon most of the year so that I can enjoy apple pie and pumpkin pie during the holidays.
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Old 03-05-2008, 09:07 AM   #5
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As for Ginger, it's 'healthy' in other aspects too. By far the best, and ,most tasty (IMHO) way of preparing it is:

slice fresh ginger (or dried if fresh is not found) in a pot of water, bring to the boil and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Then you drink this as tea, hot or cold during the day. Voilà!
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Old 03-07-2008, 01:25 AM   #6
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Jeanne,

Thanks for the link. I should have done a search myself! I took Dramamine on board a ship crossing the Atlantic one December and was one of only nine people who showed up for dinner. So, perhaps my family deals well with it, though why they needed a prescription for Triptone when one can get Dramamine over the counter, I don't know.

Ginger helps my digestion, but that's all.
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Old 04-08-2008, 07:09 AM   #7
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G,day folks I saw the mythbusters as well and my wife swares by Ginger. Its great and we've got the biggest Ginger factory in the world here in Queensland or we did maybe China,s got that now.

Good Sailing

George
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Old 04-08-2008, 10:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triton View Post
we've got the biggest Ginger factory in the world here in Queensland

Good Sailing

George
We took a tour of the factory, and it was amazing to see that much ginger in one place! I learned a lot that day.
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Old 04-08-2008, 02:48 PM   #9
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Practically everything my wife cooks she uses ginger. I will have to remember the ginger tea. Ocassionally she get a dose of sea sickness in rough weather. Maybe her sickness is due to the fact we hadn't used any ginger in a recent meal? I do about half the cooking also, and NEVER use ginger.....lol
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Old 04-18-2008, 12:35 PM   #10
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As a budding cruiser,I was always under the impression that Gin and tonic (aka GnT) was the drink of the cruising fraturnity, but it wasn't until I was speaking to a really "old salt" about this drink that they imparted this wisdom "Well the Gin helps the seasickness and the tonic........well it just goes well with the Gin!"

Not too sure which remedy to believe... but if I was to choose one........ wait for the best weather window...and just drink whatever tastes the best...
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Old 04-18-2008, 02:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Footprints View Post
As a budding cruiser,I was always under the impression that Gin and tonic (aka GnT) was the drink of the cruising fraturnity, but it wasn't until I was speaking to a really "old salt" about this drink that they imparted this wisdom "Well the Gin helps the seasickness and the tonic........well it just goes well with the Gin!"
It was my understanding that gin & tonic (quinine water) came into popular use by the memsahib Brits while posted in malaria-infested countries. The Quinine Water to protect against malaria, the gin to ease the boredom of those places.
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Old 07-27-2008, 05:44 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triton View Post
I was watching an episode of Mythbusters and they tested a range of sea sickness cures including pressure straps, Ginger and prescription treatments. They found the best was Ginger. The prescription drugs worked but made them very sleepy. My wife uses Ginger and swears by it and guess what its natural.

Good luck
Prescription drugs are unhealthy and may cause adverse reactions. I would go with the ginger as well as it is all natural. I used to suffer from sea sickness, first time I expierienced it was while whale watching. I've been fine with it ever since. Same went with car motion sickness. Knowing where the boat (or car) are going, as in being near the front, has made it easier on me to eliminate motion sickness.
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Old 07-27-2008, 11:48 PM   #13
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Sea Sickness may affect even the most seasoned sailors when conditions are bad, and if crew are required to work down below, say in the engine room. Whatever medication is kept - it is a good idea for crew to test try for side effects (some lucky people will have none)

Dramamine for one may be contra-indicated at sea for the very reason that it can cause side effects that will impair the crew's ability to function safely. see Dramamine

Stugeron (cinnarizine) is another compound of the anti-histamine family which has less side effects than Dramamine BUT it still needs the individual to test for side effects that may impair crewing. Cinnarizine

Ginger for general conditions at sea works well for many - however when the conditions are bad ie.. rough to high seas - then something stronger may help.

Dry biscuits, look at the horizon, take shifts hand steering. For crew who are really SICK : pillows at the bottom of mast where there is least movement - re-hydration fluids important.

(I feel queasy just writing this!)

Richard
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Old 12-26-2010, 10:21 PM   #14
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I just read an April 2009 article in Scientific American by Brendan Borrell about sea sickness. The title is "Finding Balance" and it is all about poor posture control being a root of sea sickness. Very interesting writing. Link to Scientific American article HERE
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