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Old 03-21-2007, 09:41 PM   #1
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  1. DC Electrician
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  4. Finish Carpenter
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And somewhere along the way, you become a sailor.
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Old 03-21-2007, 09:43 PM   #2
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HOPEFULLY you become a sailor. Unfortunately I've seen many who become power boaters with a stick in the middle.
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Old 03-21-2007, 10:16 PM   #3
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Quote:
What Do You Become When You Buy A Sailboat?
A pauper??
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Old 03-21-2007, 10:42 PM   #4
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Uh-oh! You're a brave man Charlie Jones....Power vs sail. There are a lot of blokes (and blokettes) in the Australian Navy, sailing quite large power boats, who would take umbrage at your definition of 'sailor'.

If you are out there on the water, are competent to control and safely navigate your craft which may be anything from an 8' dinghy or Minnow, to a 45' sailing yacht (or putt-putt), to a supertanker....then in my book, you are a sailor.

Aside from that, it is odd that some people keep the engine idling away even when the wind is a-blowin', the boat is a-goin' and the sails are a-billowin'.

I think my best effort was to coastal sail 1800nm using 30 ltrs (6gals) of diesel...But I have an engine driven refrigeration system and it's just plain uncivilised to not have cold beer, or ice blocks in the G&T.

On a slightly more serious note, only 20 years ago we would have determined that anyone who could not position fix using a sextant wasn't a 'proper' sailor. As a result of technological advance that no longer applies. I think engines can be considered as a mere technological advance that, as sailors, we all rely upon to some degree.

Best wishes

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Old 03-21-2007, 10:42 PM   #5
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I'd like to second the "Pauper" response - I was actually going to say "broke"
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Old 03-21-2007, 10:46 PM   #6
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A pauper??
And, it seems, the larger the sailboat (speak I from experience) the more of a pauper one becomes. Why didn't we wait to buy the boat until there were only the two of us? Oh, well. We do have room for guests. And are becoming all those things Trim 50 lists--as well as sail-repairer, canvas and cushion-cover seamstress, interior designer. The fellow on a similar boat to ours has even become a naval architect as he redesigns and rebuilds the entire thing. Literally.

We're a talented lot, all told.
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Old 03-21-2007, 10:49 PM   #7
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Yes...But happy paupers free from suits and briefcases and getting out of bed to make money for reasons other than spending money on the boat.

I am going to replicate a t-shirt which I saw in a sailing mag recently. The legend printed upon it was

"Sell your stuff and buy a boat'.

Sensible advice for life, if not the bank manager.

David
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Old 03-21-2007, 11:26 PM   #8
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12. Refrigeration Technician

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Old 03-22-2007, 07:06 AM   #9
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Uh-oh! You're a brave man Charlie Jones....Power vs sail. There are a lot of blokes (and blokettes) in the Australian Navy, sailing quite large power boats, who would take umbrage at your definition of 'sailor'.

If you are out there on the water, are competent to control and safely navigate your craft which may be anything from an 8' dinghy or Minnow, to a 45' sailing yacht (or putt-putt), to a supertanker....then in my book, you are a sailor.

David.
I concur fully with Auzee but would like to add one important element which, to me, is the ultimate sign of a good seaman.

A good and competent seaman understands not only how to safely navigate his / her own craft but has also an understanding of the difficulties faced by operators of other craft too. He / she not only recognises the limitations but takes these into account in order to make everyones time at sea safer and more enjoyable.

Examples of NOT taking into account the special conditions of other water users.......

1. the skipper who tried to sail, on the open sea, between a tug and its tow (which was a long way astern of the tug)

2. fhe motorboater who does not reduce speed and causes swell dammage to moored vessels and river banks

3. the small boat operator who passes ahead of a large vessel in a narrow fairway causing the pilot / OOW / master of that vessel to lose sight of the small craft as it dissapears below the fo'c'sle.

4. folks who do not fit and use propper navigation lights

etc. etc.

Stephen

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Old 03-22-2007, 01:16 PM   #10
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Yes! Stephen!

Sailors should not consider this an "us (sailboat) against them (powerboats/ships)", and the powerboaters need to look at it the same way. The oceans are big enough for all of us, but knowledge, empathy, and consideration are very important for a pleasant and safe landing.
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Old 03-22-2007, 02:50 PM   #11
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An interesting topic, a good checklist, an eye opener.

My first mate and I first considered going cruising on a sailing vessel, less than a year ago. We discussed it at length and reached a conclusion, making it our goal to do so. Based on our retirement goals, she gave me 10 years to prepare. That seemed more than adequate.

Not being a sailor, I considered all the possible systems on a yacht, related topics of world cruising, the skills required of a good seaman and sailor, and personal desires, (e.g. diving, fishing, traveling, photography, language, and much more). I started to wonder if 10 years would be enough time to prepare.

Our goal is to become self-sufficient, and have a plan with a budget for mandatory issues which we either can not do (e.g. haul-outs), or have no desire to. In other words, do it ourselves, or hire it done.

I did a personal inventory of our combined knowledge and skills , and compared the two lists. I feel good; have a comfort level with this list, because it is also extensive. Ten years is adequate and attainable.

Other Professions or Skills to consider adding to the list.

Para Legal / Knowledge of Laws / Responsibilities

Helmsman / Anchorage Systems

Navigator

Accountant / Budget Analyst

Logistician / Predicating / Provisioning / Procurement / Providing / Storing

Administrative Clerk

Librarian

Mathematician / Mutli-system Conversions

Computer Systems Operator / Related Skills

Chef / Cook / Butcher - food preparation and preservation

Outdoorsmen Type / Survivalist / Street Smarts / Improvise (**)

Athlete / Swimming / Diving / Climbing

Fisherman

Diplomat / Host / Good Person - Demeanor - Manners / Good Steward / Protocol / Social Skills

Historian / Country Studies - Know something about the country, language, people and their culture, customs, currency

Biologist esp. Marine

Conservationist / Ecologist

Chemist - corrosion, rust, electrolysis, batteries, chemicals and product storage & mixing, gases

Interrupter

Para Medic / First Aid

Fire Fighter / Prevention

Personal and Physical Security of Crew, Vessel / MOB / Rescue

Adventurer

Student

Teacher

** Duct Tape Engineer with a Minor(s) in Silicone Glue and Wire!

One has to know something about most disciplines, and master many.
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Old 03-22-2007, 07:09 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeanneP View Post
Yes! Stephen!

Sailors should not consider this an "us (sailboat) against them (powerboats/ships)", and the powerboaters need to look at it the same way. The oceans are big enough for all of us, but knowledge, empathy, and consideration are very important for a pleasant and safe landing.
Indeed Jeanne,

This is the essence of good seamanship. It is not a question of them versus us but more of how can we together make the seas a safer and more enjoyable place for us all, whilst protecting the marine environment.

We have the advantage of spending much of our time in a wonderful environment. It is, I believe, our duty to protect the environment, increase knowledge and safety of all at sea and pass this knowledge on to the next generation.

This, of course, brings us back to the topic of paying crews. I believe that, as I have derived so much pleasure over so many years from being at sea, I am obliged to pass on some of the knowledge I have accrued to the next generation. It is not a question of how much I can make /subvention my cruising by it but how much of the knowledge, pleasure and joy of sailing I can pass on to others.

To return to the original topic, one of the things I have become is teacher / mentor. In all honesty, it is probably the most enjoyable component of what is a tremendously enjoyable way of life.

Aye,

Stephen

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Old 03-23-2007, 04:25 AM   #13
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Auzzee- I wasn't knocking power boaters and I used to wear a white hat on some large power vessels around OUR part of the world.

I was referring to those who ran power boats with those sticks in the middle- you know- they call them masts, but all they use them for is to hang an awning.

THAT kind of power boater
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Old 03-23-2007, 10:31 AM   #14
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Sorry, Charlie, I should have picked up that idea and run with it, since when we did have a sailboat it amazed me how many people motored rather than sailed. When we first started cruising we met a group of boats who were heading East along the southern coast of Puerto Rico, as were we. They were a most congenial and pleasant couple of boats and we joined them. Yet every morning as we all set out, Peter would raise the sails and we would make our first long tack of the day, sailing, occasionally motor-sailing, SE until we could tack back onto the course to the agreed-upon next anchorage, and those two boats would motor with nary a sail raised. Not that we were purists, mind you, with our engine running to give us an extra boost on the calmer days. For about a week this scene was repeated every morning, and neither of the two boats ever saw the incongruity of their motoring while we sailed; we arrived at the anchorage each day about an hour or more before they did.

In their defense, they were new to the entire sail/cruising thing, and they soon gained the courage and skills to venture farther, longer, without the iron genny called into service so quickly.

I see it more nowadays than back then. And I'm not sure whether we wouldn't have been as "bad" as they were if I had had my way in those early days. Peter, though, was a bit of the "we are a sailboat, by gum, and we are going to sail!" Which experience taught me that (a) we traveled faster under wind power than under engine power; and ( it was always more comfortable with the sails up.

To add to the replies to What Do You Become When You Buy a Sailboat, I guess I would add ........different.

Fair winds,

Jeanne
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