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Old 04-21-2007, 07:40 PM   #1
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Found this absolute gem of a webpage that got me thinking. What have YOU learned while cruising?

There are some "gems" from "David's journals".



Is there anything YOU can add to this list?

See the list at post # 3 below.
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Old 04-22-2007, 12:20 AM   #2
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Great !!!

What I learned :- a) The day you take possession of your new cruising yacht is the very day that you start maintenance. You will still be involved in maintenance on the day she becomes someone else's.
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Old 04-23-2007, 02:09 PM   #3
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Email from David - thank you for allowing us to post your list here:

Quote:
Please feel free to use anything from our web sites. We hope that our websites will inspire other people to live their dreams. Maxingout.com is our main cruising site and has sailing information, photos, videos, and podcasts. PositiveGraphics.com is a photographic site that has some of our best photos taken during our eleven year circumnavigation, and it also has desert photos from four-wheel driving adventures in Arabia and Australia. PositiveThinkingRadio.com also has stories on it, that deal with positive thinking and adventures that we have had sailing around the world and driving offroad in the deserts of the Middle East and Australia.

We are continually expanding and updating our web sites with new videos and original music written and performed by my son, David.

You have our permission to use anything from any of our web sites.

Cheers,

Dave

Exit Only

http://maxingout.com

http://positivegraphics.com

http://positivethinkingradio.com
David's list:



34 Things I've Learned in 33,000 Miles

1. Mom likes to say "the journey is the destination". She's right. Although we sailed from point to point on a map, locations were only a skeleton on which to build our adventure.

2. You find what you're looking for. The cruises who talk about the dangers lurking in each location are invariably the ones who find trouble. Cruisers who make smart decisions and keep a positive attitude somehow manage to find good stuff in the same places and enjoy themselves much more.

3. Cruising is a great investment of time.

4. If I have children, I will take them cruising. They will thank me.

5. There is no shortage of adventure in the world but most of the real ones aren't easy.

6. For every Paris or Rome there are a thousand hidden corners of the globe where people like you and me make a life. The corners are usually where my favorite memories originate.

7. Cruising let's you share a back porch with a billionaire. In Turkey we anchored next to a diamond merchant's 200 foot megayacht for two days. He spent 50 million dollars to visit the same destination as us. Some people buy floating condominiums and some people buy the sailing equivalent of a cargo crate, but we all meet at the same barbecue pit on the beach.

8. There is always something to do on a boat. You are never, ever bored.

9. The Caribbean is high quality cruising. The Bahamas are shockingly beautiful. Who knew there are such awesome destinations so close to the States?

10. Ocean crossing is mostly about persistence. Just point the boat in the right direction, don't hit anything for a few days, and you're good to go.

11. Reality TV is stupid.

12. One of my favorite things about cruising is how every day is different. You never know what wrinkles will be thrown into your schedule so you might as well take off your wristwatch.

13. Don't use pens from the desk of an Immigration officer without asking for permission first.

14. Lost in an arid, desolate land? Shipwrecked on a deserted island? Trapped in a canyon by a pack of hyenas? Never fear. They'll build a new Starbucks at your location within the week.

15. When locals point to the next island as "dangerous", there are usually people on that island pointing back at them and saying the same thing.

16. Other yachties refer to you by your boat name (for example, if our friends on Duetto were talking about us they might say "Exit Only are brilliant mariners"). Remember this when you get the urge to name your vessel La Cucaracha.

17. There is something wonderfully mysterious about harnessing the wind to travel.

18. Always learn a few phrases in the local language. People appreciate the effort and it's a great way to make new friends. (NOTE: be sure to know the exact meaning of your newfound phrases before you shout them across crowded rooms at sword-toting strangers)

19. Never overestimate the common sense of charter boats when it comes to anchoring. I don't want to sound negative but you would not believe some of the stuff we've seen in the Caribbean. Usually the accidents happen because they don't observe the First Rule of Doing Anything on a Boat (see #20).

20. Slow is better than fast. Disasters usually happen because someone is trying to accomplish something too fast. It's similar to operating a chainsaw in this respect.

21. It is OK to say "no, thanks" when pressured to buy something. If the vendor still refuses to acknowledge your right not to part with your hard earned cash, shout newly learned local phrases (NOTE: unless the seller has a sword...in which case, buy something from them. Preferably a shield or a larger sword).

22. On the extremely rare occasions when we've been pressured for a bribe, a polite "no" has worked. This seems to be the consensus opinion of most cruisers and travelers I know.

23. You find good people wherever you go.

24. God loves every single person on this planet. I know it sounds glib but this thought keeps popping into the forefront of my mind as we travel. That Maldivian lady fishing on the end of the pier? God loves her. The rich Italian punk who ripped by in a speedboat and rocked us with a huge wake? God loves him. The guy in Grenada who snuck onto our boat at night and didn't see anything worth taking, but left muddy footprints? God loves him. The lady who smiled and gave us extra bread at the market in Sudan? God loves her. The list goes on forever. It is such a mind-blowing idea and it makes me want to treat other people better because we when you get right down to it, we're all the same. By the way, God loves you too.

25. Cruising isn't always fun. Long night watches, rough passages, boat maintenance, getting trapped on board for days of non-stop rain, living in close proximity with three other adults (two of whom are your parents), lightning storms, relatives who don't understand, living at the mercy of the weather, frequent discomfort, traveling at speeds which make a snail on a unicycle look fast, and intermittent contact with shore-based friends are all part of the deal. But it's worth it.

26. All ocean passages include a few hours when ice cream is the sole topic of conversation.

27. It would have been nice to have a freezer on board.

28. A good hat is worth it's weight in ice cream. I lucked out and found an Australian cowboy hat with enough stiffness and brim width to serve as my personal umbrella.

29. Never trust a strange camel.

30. Every Diet Coke manufacturer uses a slightly different recipe. The flavors range from "Throat-chokingly Harsh" to "Heavenly Nectar". Always check which it is before you buy 12 cases.

31. You know how all the pictures from the 1800s and 1900s show people with serious faces? I guess photographs were too rare to waste on tomfoolery and goofy smiles. Interestingly, many eastern cultures are modern day proponents of "straight faced" photography. People are affable and smiling in conversation until I ask if I can take a photo, whereupon they straighten up and get serious.

It makes me wonder about my natural inclination to act like a goofball whenever anyone points a camera at me. At the very least I usually smile. Why? Am I trying to inject happiness into a memory which might otherwise appear bland? How many times have you seen an arguing couple on vacation stop and smile while a stranger takes their picture, then go right back to arguing? What will they remember of their trip when they look back at their photos?

32. Daily radio nets are a great way to keep morale up on the open ocean. Especially if you are the one with the best fishing story.

33. Humanity has a startling history of warfare. Sometimes I felt like we were touring the world from fortress to fortress. Leading me to my next reflection…..

34. This might not be a popular point of view but I think it is worth considering: How arrogant is it that Europeans (and I include my own ancestry in this category) had the gall to land on islands populated by natives and claim them in the name of their homeland? In school I was taught that European colonial expansion was motivated by "God, gold, and glory". They achieved these goals thanks to superior military technology (they had the guns).

Imagine if aliens from the nearby Chewbaccan galaxy landed a spaceship on South Beach (in Miami) and claimed Florida as part of the Chewbaccan Republic…never mind the high rise buildings full of Canadians….or the sun-drenched beach revelers angry about the spaceship blocking their sun…or the fact that no one wants to subjugate themselves to a Republic named after a sidekick ("We bow to no one but Han Solo!"). The aliens aren't concerned because they have energy cannons, sonic blasters, and shields which make them impervious to anything Will Smith or Tom Cruise can do. If the Chewbaccans want Florida, we are helpless to stop them.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

What have YOU learned?

.
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Old 04-23-2007, 02:36 PM   #4
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Ugh!

Biltong does not travel well on boats without fridges!

Don't ask!

Stephen

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Old 04-23-2007, 04:21 PM   #5
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Great videos! Thanks for the link.
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Old 04-23-2007, 08:01 PM   #6
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#2 should be painted on every boat's bulkhead, in glowing letters. "You find what you're looking for."!!!!!!!!

What a great list! And he's so right about the Bahamas, people should perk up their eyes and ears and not miss them.

Fair winds and may David continue to post his great insights.

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Old 05-03-2007, 04:43 PM   #7
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Nice list!

I Like #34.

After having been cruising the Caribbean for a wile I find it amazing that most of the (now) inhabitants (of african origin) are so friendly and helpful to us european cruising people...

And what have we learned while cruising?

"It's always better to be in that harbour and wishing you were out there,

than

to be out there and wishing you were in the harbour."

(Quoting Jim, a great sailor from the UK we met in Portugal some years ago)

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Old 09-26-2007, 09:25 PM   #8
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Im have learned I am pretty darned self-reliant, and yes......the Bahamas are gorgeous!
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Old 09-26-2007, 09:46 PM   #9
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When sailing: If it doesn’t come easy, then you are fighting with nature. Take a moment to think!
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