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Old 12-25-2008, 03:35 AM   #15
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I've been buying a bunch of pelican cases off Ebay for my tools and smal electronics. Amazing how cheap you can get these things.
About the pelican cases...you've been living aboard and I assume that's with many of your tools and small electronics already there--do you notice much corrosion or how have things been doing thus far with hand tools, power tools, electronics and so on?
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Old 12-25-2008, 08:52 PM   #16
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Nope, our boat is very dry. The Pelicans are for taking items like cameras, tools computers ashore. Plus there is always the chance that a hatch may fail or god forbid one gets rolled.

I don't keep power tools on the boat at this time...we have a 40 ft shipping container in a storage yard near the marina. I figure I will take all the Ryobi's and palm sanders. The big tools like table saws, drill press, band saw.etc will have to go to AZ.
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Old 12-25-2008, 09:29 PM   #17
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Nope, our boat is very dry. The Pelicans are for taking items like cameras, tools computers ashore. Plus there is always the chance that a hatch may fail or god forbid one gets rolled.

I don't keep power tools on the boat at this time...we have a 40 ft shipping container in a storage yard near the marina. I figure I will take all the Ryobi's and palm sanders. The big tools like table saws, drill press, band saw.etc will have to go to AZ.
Glad to hear its generally dry!

Yea, we're taking the little stuff but not the big stuff. Of course, for us that includes all of David's 28V Milwaukee tools...

In July, when a guy we had working with us on the boat completed his stuff, he took his drillpress with him. We were immediately feeling pressure to buy one but didn't want to because we've got a huge one in storage in Maryland. And, truly what we were most using the press for was simply making various sizes of wood bungs to cover screw holes in the wood So, we picked up a little, used, Craftsman drill press stand similar to this one. These stands only work with drills that have a traditional chuck rather than the fatter hand-set type. Of the 7 drills we have here in California, only one fits that description--a nice Bosch hammer drill we lengthened the straps for holding the larger drill body and put the hammer drill in. Oh, my, that little stand is totally awesome. Also, it is made so you can put a grinding wheel on it (of course, we got a stone for it). The press we got is aluminum with some regular steel parts. You could probably replace the steel with stainless, but these little fold up, put-away stands to turn your drill into a press really are a great thing to have on a boat.

We have a bench-top mill-drill that is in debate whether it goes with us. David wants it and I don't. Since I'm the one who does the milling, I figure I'll end up with final say It is not very powerful, but I've used it to mill all kinds of small, out of production car parts and expect we'd end up doing the same for something for the boat but haven't used it yet here in California.

Again, good luck with all the final prep!
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Old 12-26-2008, 06:06 PM   #18
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How do you like that 28V lithium ion tool set? I've heard plus and minus reviews. I still have the 18V Ryobis which are basically disposable tools....only thing is, they last forever!
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Old 12-26-2008, 07:18 PM   #19
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How do you like that 28V lithium ion tool set? I've heard plus and minus reviews. I still have the 18V Ryobis which are basically disposable tools....only thing is, they last forever!
It;'s an awesome set of tools. Couldn't go wrong if you decided to get into the 28V Milwaukee tools. We had no battery powered tools whatsoever when starting the project--just lots of air tools, and power tools with extension cords and a couple bit-and-brace and Yankee drivers that we'd used on our various house projects. As you may know, the major rebuild of our schooner has taken a little over two years. Those V28 tools have been used day-in and day-out and have been great.

At the beginning of the project, David went to the ToolDepot and got a great deal on a setup that included the skill-type saw, a drill, recip saw (a sawsall), soft case, battery-powered flashlight, charger and two batteries. Then, with replacing keelbolts looming, he quickly purchased the (huge) variable speed angle V28 angle drill (w/o battery and charger) for a good price at the same place. That drill is better than the Milwaukee Hole Hawg (which someone else had on the project) because the V28 was variable speed it could drill 2-1/4" holes thru the lead keel with no problem (just don't go too fast or the lead melts and the auger/forsner type bit becomes encased...and, it did take two people to hold the drill because of the torque) but David did frag the gears on it (warranted repair, btw) within a month...the repair shop said "take it easy, man"

Later in the project, the right angle drill was used with a 6-1/4"" hole saw to cut 18 of our portholes through the finished 1-3/8" planking and 3" oak port hole backing blocks topped with 1-5/8" mahogany inside...6" of wood. No problem, hang on tight. Again, the Hole Hawg couldn't perform this task because it was not variable speed.

David and another guy used the two drills, skill-type saw, and recip saw such that at least one V28 tool was in use almost non-stop 10 hours a day, 5 days a week for about 8 months, hot-swapping the two batteries all day long. Since then, in the past 18 months I'd say the V28 tools get about 2 hrs/day average usage as the work moved into more finish carpentry and more use of the tablesaw and planers. One of the batteries had a warranted replacement at about the 10 month point. The batteries have a two year warranty, btw. The skill-type saw had a repair in about 1 year...complete rebuild (another warranted repair) after it was used for cutting about 1/2 of the 2" thick hardwood planking for the entire boat. The V28 skill-type saw, going thru full 2" planking stock of mahogany and 2" framing stock of hard Angelique, was as useful as any of the other skill-type saws in the boatyard. The same saw was used to cut about half our fir deckbeams, too.

When our helper's work was done and he took his tools with him late last summer, he also took his 14" bandsaw and his portable metal cutting bandsaw (oh, so nice to have folks around with great tools) so we were faced with another dilemma--buy a bandsaw or what? Well, we'd used this guy's portable metal cutting bandsaw for all kinds of things (wood and metal) including making the bronze 3/8" chainplates....and we needed to cut more plate so we recently purchased one of the factory-reconditioned and warrantied 28V metal cutting band saws. It also works great--its been used on mostly bronze plate or bronze/brass sheet metal so far. We can set it up stationary with our bench-top vise or use it as intended portable. Oh, and now we have 3 batteries and a second charger since one of each came with that purchase.

So...how are those V28 tools? They're really great. Seldom do we use the corded tools now. If we use a handtools that's not a V28 tool, its probably an air tool for fasteners, or, planers, grinders, and sanders.
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Old 01-25-2009, 05:27 PM   #20
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Folks just a note here, when working with many marine grade hard woods you REALLY want to be where a high grade filter mask and some form of eye and skin proctection. Working on concertinas i work with mahogany, ebony, and a few other exotic hard woods (until I can get a sealed cover for the CNC the wife has outlawed cocobo & a few others).

I don't mean to insult and hope none is taken, I just grew up around wood as Grandda was a master woodwright and learned early that wood can kill you if you don't take the proper care when dealing with the dust.

Again no insult meant and I really hope none taken. It is just that cancer sucks trust me (not from wood though).

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Old 01-25-2009, 06:16 PM   #21
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Good point well made!

Thanks for this valuable information Michael.

Members take note for your own sakes and please spread this information.

Aye // Stephen
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Old 01-29-2009, 03:15 PM   #22
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What is it about hardwood dust that will kill you? I know for a fact that I have ingested my fair share of teak dust over the years!
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Old 01-30-2009, 06:52 AM   #23
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What is it about hardwood dust that will kill you? I know for a fact that I have ingested my fair share of teak dust over the years!
Dunno about death, Ken, but several woods have dust that, because they're so fine, can mess up your lungs. Example that we worked with is Alaskan Yellow Cedar--very fine. Other woods can quickly bring on allergic reactions similar to mold and other more common allergens. I know a fellow whose throat closes down and needs an epi- shot if subjected to dust of Greenheart. The (professional woodworker) fellow who helped my husband with planking the boat and many other woodworking tasks was quite sensitive to the Sapele (African Mahogany) that we were using for all that work. As well as having mold allergies, I'm personally sensitive to redwood dust (face turns red, rashes, and sinus headaches). I suppose its a matter of being exposed to something extensively for most people--at some point they can have an allergic reaction.
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Old 01-30-2009, 03:23 PM   #24
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Interesting about the African Mahogany...we have a lot of it aboard Trim. It took us years to figure out exactly what kind of wood it was because it was so dark without stain. It is a deep brownish red all the way through apparently from age...makes very nice T&G.

lookingaft_scale_1_.jpg[attachment=1994:galley_t...scale_1_.jp

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Old 01-30-2009, 06:40 PM   #25
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Interesting about the African Mahogany...we have a lot of it aboard Trim. It took us years to figure out exactly what kind of wood it was because it was so dark without stain. It is a deep brownish red all the way through apparently from age...makes very nice T&G.

g]
There are a couple different woods referred to as African Mahogany. The Sapele is closest to Honduran mahogany in looks, rot resistance, etc. Another wood commonly called African Mahogany but isn't really in the same family is Kaya. The wood isn't nearly as pretty, nor rot resistant, though. We used Kaya to replace our white oak quarter logs on the stern as we could get large chunks of it (8" x 12" cross section) which was preferred to gluing up smaller dimension Sapele or White Oak for that purpose.

The reddish brown color is how Sapele looks when you get it from the lumber yard. When exposed to water (especially with iron content) it will turn black in the eposed area, as will all mahoganies. The difference between African Mahogany and Honduran Mahogany is that when exposed to UV light the African Mahogany will lighten but the Honduran Mahogany will darken in color. Both Sapele and Honduran can have that very distinctive ribbon graining pattern which I think is very pretty.

You're lucky to have such a pretty interior! Ken. Is this one of the things that drew you to this particular boat?
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Old 02-02-2009, 04:14 PM   #26
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You're lucky to have such a pretty interior! Ken. Is this one of the things that drew you to this particular boat?
Actually, when we found the boat, the interior was completely trashed. Most of the wood was in a pile and the engine was on an a-frame in the galley. All the head liner was pulled out and wires were hanging down where lights once hung. Our friends thought we were insane to buy the mess.

What attracted me to her were her flush decks, aft cockpit, and clean shearlines with overhangs...basic classical sailing vessel lines...you know the ones of the old J-boat days. At 25y/o, I pictured myself laying the teak decks on her and painting her midnight blue. Over 10 years later I finally got around to doing it.

I have a bunch of pictures from when I first found her that I need to get out of storage, scan into digital format and put together a before and after collage.
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Old 02-26-2009, 11:18 PM   #27
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Actually, when we found the boat, the interior was completely trashed. Most of the wood was in a pile and the engine was on an a-frame in the galley. All the head liner was pulled out and wires were hanging down where lights once hung. Our friends thought we were insane to buy the mess.

What attracted me to her were her flush decks, aft cockpit, and clean shearlines with overhangs...basic classical sailing vessel lines...you know the ones of the old J-boat days. At 25y/o, I pictured myself laying the teak decks on her and painting her midnight blue. Over 10 years later I finally got around to doing it.

I have a bunch of pictures from when I first found her that I need to get out of storage, scan into digital format and put together a before and after collage.
I'm glad that you've done such a wonderful job with the boat! Can't wait to meet you in person and see the boat out at Catalina Island!

You're lovely interior reminds me of how much work we'll continue to do once launched--we look like a giant fish hold in comparison!
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Old 02-27-2009, 04:21 AM   #28
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I'm glad that you've done such a wonderful job with the boat! Can't wait to meet you in person and see the boat out at Catalina Island!

You're lovely interior reminds me of how much work we'll continue to do once launched--we look like a giant fish hold in comparison!
Keep in mind I've been working on her for almost 20 years...hard to believe really. There were a hand full of years I let her go, but I eventually came back around.
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