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Old 02-18-2009, 05:30 PM   #1
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Italian biodiesel producers are interested in it; the UK’s Crown Estate has expressed support as well. Now Indonesia is looking to capitalize on its abundant supplies of seaweed and turn it into biodiesel. To do so it’s engaging the help of South Korea, Cleantech reports. While S. Korea has the know-how, it doesn’t have enough seaweed, with the reverse being true of Indonesia.

Cultivated Seaweed to be Used

In 2006, Indonesia harvested over a million tons of seaweed, a figure which is expected to nearly double by 2009, and is hoping to turn a portion of that into biodiesel—with the goal of lowering the price of biodiesel from $2/liter to $1/liter.

The seaweed is being cultivated in Maluku, East Belitung and Lombok. The Korea Institute of Industrial Technology will be supplying the processing technology.

No word on when seaweed biodiesel processing will begin or the location of processing facilities.
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Old 02-18-2009, 07:32 PM   #2
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Now thats! cool
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Old 02-18-2009, 07:45 PM   #3
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I wonder if I could get a research grant and coastal marine location at Catalina Island to grow giant Kelp for biodiesel. I could live on my boat, scuba dive everyday and make diesel for my friends...seriously.
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Old 02-18-2009, 07:53 PM   #4
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I wonder if I could get a research grant and coastal marine location at Catalina Island to grow giant Kelp for biodiesel. I could live on my boat, scuba dive everyday and make diesel for my friends...seriously.
It used to be that the state of California was great for that type of research grant--but you know they're belly up right now

On the other hand, getting a grant from the US DOE is a possibility. They've funded small businesses to do all kinds of things energy-related. Further, we can hope that the Department of Commerce brings back the ATP grants as they fit nicely into the Obama stimulus plans. An ATP would be a considerable way to go if they re-opened the program.

I could get into sea-farming giant kelp
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Old 02-18-2009, 08:45 PM   #5
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I just hope that anyone going into this field takes into account the fact that marine life is already under great pressure. Kelp forests and the areas rich in other forms of seaweed are also the nurseries of many forms of marine life. Destroying that would further increase the threat against many fishes, crustaceans and marine mammals such as sea otters.

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Old 02-18-2009, 08:49 PM   #6
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I just hope that anyone going into this field takes into account the fact that marine life is already under great pressure. Kelp forests and the areas rich in other forms of seaweed are also the nurseries of many forms of marine life. Destroying that would further increase the threat against many fishes, crustaceans and marine mammals such as sea otters.

Aye // Stephen
Well, if one increased the kelp forests with such farming it is possible that one would be assisting those forms of sea life. I suppose it entirely depends upon the harvesting methods.
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Old 02-19-2009, 12:15 AM   #7
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kelp008_1_.gif

I would imagine a Kelp farm located on the backside (south or west facing) of Catalina or one of the Channel Islands where the water is 55 - 65 degrees F year round on a flat plane at 80-100 feet deep.

Everything you would want to know about Giant Kelp...

http://www.starthrower.org/research/...sc/kelp_mp.htm

and way way more than you would ever want to know here...

http://www.fao.org/docrep/x5819e/x5819e0a.htm
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Old 02-19-2009, 12:45 AM   #8
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Ah...something to consider Kelp is 88% saltwater. This means that 88% of your harvesting effort will be to the removal of water. I'd imagine that this is where the reality sets in.

From:Cellulosic Ethanol: a greener alternative

By Charles Stillman, June 2006

Sugar beets, which are used to produce the majority of France's ethanol, yield just over 700 gallons of ethanol per acre. Brazil's sugarcane produces 662 gallons of ethanol per acre. Switchgrass, a tall prairie grass native to the US that yields over 1,000 gallons per acre, more than 3 times the yield of corn. Recent research conducted at the University of Illinois has shown that miscanthus, a tall reed like grass, can produce as much as 1,500 gallons of ethanol per acre.

Sugarcane, at 1:8, yields about eight units of energy for every one unit invested to grow, harvest and convert the cane into ethanol. The fibrous cane material that remains after the sugar has been extracted (also known as bagasse) is used to provide heat (read: energy) in the distillation process. In most cases, this eliminates the need for energy from an external source. One unit of energy is used for every five units provided by the Miscanthus-based ethanol fuel. Switchgrass's net energy yield is slightly less, at about 1:4. Sugar beets yield nearly two units of energy for every one unit that is used to grow and convert the crop into ethanol. Corn lies near the very bottom of the list at 1:1.4.
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Old 02-19-2009, 11:52 AM   #9
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Unfortunately, Indonesia's record regarding the sustaining of their sea life in any form is not encouraging !!!!

Poverty determines the priorities! Population out of control not only the product of the Vatican.
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Old 02-19-2009, 10:35 PM   #10
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My "scariest" "snorkeling" (not diving) experience ever was one day, off Baja, when I decided I wanted see what a kelp forest looked like from the top. We'd been canoing through a kelp bed on our way from a beach area to some sea caves and an adjacent area for snorkeling. We'd had several sea lions follow us and they were very cute sticking their noses up with their heads hidden under the kelp like they though we couldn't see them. Even though kelp beds are very, very deep/tall, I though there must be quite a bit of sea life there, close to the surface as there were so many seals, porpoise, sea lions, etc around. I was in a wet suit so I jumped into the water and pulled on my mask. Oh, it was a bit murky with the sun shining down.

I dived down about 15 feet and looked back up at the red canoe above me. There were fish around which was cool but the murkiness kept me from seeing very far and a few shadows (probably the sea lions or seals) suddenly had my frantically swimming for the surface. I'd never felt so terrified in my life. As I scrambled back into the canoe...saying "oh, my, oh, my...oh, my!" and gasping for air David thought I'd seen a shark or some other scary creature of the deep! I was totally terrified as if a monster had chased me from the deep. Later that day I laughed about it, but it really was quite spooky.
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Old 02-20-2009, 03:56 PM   #11
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You should spend some scuba time in a giant kelp forest! It is an absolutely amazing view from 100 ft down looking up and out onto a reef and watching the schools of fish wind their way through.

Just thinking about it makes me want to go diving.

Do you and your husband dive? If not, I highly recommend it...I'm sorry that I waited till so late in life to get started. It will change your perspective of the ocean.
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Old 02-20-2009, 05:05 PM   #12
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We spent some time in Lombok, and observed their seaweed farming. *They do, indeed, farm the seaweed, planting small pieces onto a frame of laced line. *It is very labor intensive, and all their available beach area is used to dry the seaweed. *Here's a picture I took of the drying seaweed - dark green, wet and newly harvested; brown, getting drier; yellow-white, dry, ready for packing and shipping.

Traditionally the seaweed is converted to agar-agar - for jelly for local consumption and as a growth medium on petri dishes. *I cannot believe that they can expand their industry beyond what they produce now. *Considering the corruption rampant in Indonesia, I view this as a scam to get outsiders to "invest" in a locally-connected person's "business", soon to consume all the investor's spare cash before declaring bankruptcy and on to the next mark to show up.

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Old 02-20-2009, 06:53 PM   #13
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You should spend some scuba time in a giant kelp forest! It is an absolutely amazing view from 100 ft down looking up and out onto a reef and watching the schools of fish wind their way through.

Just thinking about it makes me want to go diving.

Do you and your husband dive? If not, I highly recommend it...I'm sorry that I waited till so late in life to get started. It will change your perspective of the ocean.
Hi, Ken,

My husband got his dive certification way back in the late 70's as a teenager. He's dived off-and-on over the years. He loves it. His sister and brother-in-law owned a dive excursion business for a while in the Florida Keys and he was always thrilled to spend time with them diving!

However, together, we've done much more snorkeling as I learned in the mid-80's that I have sinus-related problems and cannot properly valsalva to clear my ears. This is a problem for me when flying as well. I love snorkeling and often free dive as far down as my ears will allow. The deeper you go the more seductive the ocean is. The underwater world is quite amazing.

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