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Old 10-12-2008, 06:55 AM   #1
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I hope all is well. My name is BJ, friends call me tank. I sail mostly in the local lakes of Georgia. I live just west of Six Flags, outside of Atlanta Georgia. I want to gain the best, and most expierience i can sailing. I would eventually like to cruise a few months out of the year or liveaboard full time. So, what is the best route?

A. Go to as many ASA or other sailing schools as i can, to get certifications? Most of these schools are not that expensive, but which ones? Remember i live just outside the city of Atlanta. The school would need to be on the Atlantic or Gulf coast, so i could drive down...if need be.Any advice for schools,names, package deals?

B. Not go to sailing schools, and just spend the money crewing on other boats. If i only have to pay for food and travel, then i could afford a lot of trips throughout the year for the same price as a few of the sailing courses. $10.00 a day for a crew spot onboard is not bad. $2000.00 or more for sailing coarses would go a long way for $10.00 aday crew spot.

So, what should i do. Oh yea, just one more thing, I will graduate in the spring 2009, my 2nd degree. the road will be slow for the rest of the year, but come spring, I'm out to sea! Any advice at all, questions, comments..
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Old 10-12-2008, 07:18 AM   #2
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Welcome aboard "Tank".

I would say to go with B - buy a couple of books and crew as often as you can on as many different boats as you can. This will give you the opportunity to see what kind of boat you would like to buy in the future.

Good luck with your plans and keep us updated.
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Old 10-12-2008, 07:52 AM   #3
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Tnank you..... I already started with the books, one thing college has taught me is, get educated, get reading material early and get ahead of everyone else.. here are the books i orderd in the last month; The Annapolis book of seamanship,Sailing fundamentals(ASA course book), Crusing fundamentals(ASA course book), How to read a Nautical chart by Nigel Calder,World crusing routes by Jimmy Cornell, Marine Diesel Engines by Nigel Calder, Nautical charts(ASA Course book).
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Old 10-12-2008, 09:03 AM   #4
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That is a REALLY good start - read! read! read!
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Old 10-12-2008, 10:34 AM   #5
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In the winter before we left to go cruising, I read Chapman's "Piloting" from cover to cover, and then got, at a blue-water experienced friend's suggestion, the then version of the "Colregs study Guide" which illustrated the various light configurations you need to identify at night.

U.S. local sailors are often woefully unfamiliar with the rules of the road, or Colregs.

The problem with books that tell you how to sail, they really aren't that helpful unless you go out to practice each lesson immediately. I found that for me, at least, it was more enlightening to sail with somebody, then go read the appropriate section, then go out to practice what I had seen and read about.

Another big help and inexpensive way to get experience is to sign on as crew for the local yacht club races. A willing crew is most welcome, and the winning boats' skippers understand sail trim and the most effective ways to tack and gybe. You will also see, and learn, what not to do.

Whatever. Get out there and sail.
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