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Old 09-20-2007, 07:08 AM   #1
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Today saw the commencement of the serious business of 'getting rid of stuff'. Going through cupboards, shelves and boxes filled with memories. Some things will be placed in storage. Mostly, they will be items with little cash value, but with enormous sentimental attachment.

There is no doubt that it will become a more difficult task as time runs down between life ashore and life afloat. Some minor problems bring more anxiety than is merited. For instance, which one of the four sets of crockery will find a new home on the boat? Which pans of a large cookware set will be taken and which will be abandoned to the lawn sale?

Then there are the drinking mugs which were bought in Venice. They are beautiful examples of Moreno craftsmanship, but they have small bases which makes them impractical for the boat. It is only a small consideration but it's one more indicator pointing to the extraordinary change ahead. The intrinsic importance of individual possessions is being eclipsed by emotional association.

In my shed, I have every conceivable power tool; I have more spanners, screwdrivers, planes, files, hammers, mallets and sledges than I know what to do with. They have been used to build a boat and a house...and been used in the renovation two homes and four other boats. I can only keep those tools which I absolutely need for the maintenance of the boat.

I will have no difficulty in getting rid of the lawnmower, the pool vac, leaf blower....equally I will shed not one tear when six business suits, a hundred ties and a tuxedo disappear.

The difficulty is not so much a product of divesting oneself of 'bits', rather it is the significance of the bits... each one with a particular story or note which evokes a memory and which when recalled, has the power to cause individual or shared tears to be shed....Some are happy, others sad and some purely shed through fear. Not fear of the unknown, because cruising is an old friend. I guess we fear losing the security of lifelong habits and the comfort we take from the broad routine of surviving within a warm and friendly community.

It's tough, but the committment has been forged through a lifetime of dreaming, and to not do it would be inconceivable. At the end of the ride, there can be no room for regretting what may have been.

Perhaps one day, I can adopt Jeanne's mantra...."20 years ago we went cruising......."

David.
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Old 09-20-2007, 08:26 AM   #2
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David,

All is understandable.

What you wrote, reminds of a few things.

One from the past.

In the 1980's I used to work with Larry W (R.I.P). Larry had 14 years in the US Navy, with his last staiton based in San Dieago CA. Larry, his wife Susan, and three children moved half way across the country, CA to ND, for their own reasons. He often related his moving story, "We moved all our junk, than we sorted and tossed it when we unpacked it. We paid dearly to store and move trash!"

More recently; this century,

In 2000 I moved from ND to AZ. In 2001 I moved to NV, storing a van style large trailer, and van style truck in NV for several years, while moving back to ND for two years, than moving to CO; finally able to recover the Truck and Trailer Vans to CO in 2006. I lived with OUT the junk for years, but still paid to store it. I still am unpackling "Stuff". Oh I found the memories and treasures. I sound like a basket case? I am not.

I made up my mind to get rid of the junk. I have more books than a library. I read them, I know them and I don't plan on reading them again. e-Bay! Craig's List! Donate, give them to a library, drop them in a lounge. Travel locations: Take a book - Leave a book ...travel locations like Marinas, Truck Stops, Resorts. There is an Air Force Base nearby. All branches of the military serve and pass thru there; I'll leave some books, in that lounge.

Before I moved, in 2000, I reduced my ball cap collection from over 600, to under 50 dust collectors with significant and special meaning. I never wear them. I hardly look at them. I decided to take pictures of 40, and donate the rest to a musem, with the history attached. There are a few I just can't part with yet.

Things come with sentimental value. You don't need to save the things to save the sentiments. Take a picture of objects, scan papers.

If the clothes don't fit or out of style or you did not wear them in the last year, you are not going to this year. Donate them to somebody that will.

It cost a lot of money, time, effort, frustration to keep, move and store junk. Just toss it. It seems like an asset, but it is a liability.

I am not just saying this. I am doing it. I have been "cleaning house", since early this month, when I needed to replace computers, software, and office equipment. That got me started, when I had to dig thru boxes of cables and equipment, realizing when I bought some of it, when I last used it, and likely NEVER - EVER will use the old junk again, some which did not work when I put it in the spare parts boxes. Parralell and serial cables, data swicthes, 2 wire RJ-11's..... 8 Track tapes and cassettes ....Lp's and 45's ...ok that is a streatch, but I have music on cassettes and cables from the 1980's; but... Enough is ENUFF, said I!

I have a working older computer with Window 95, upgraded to Windows 98, FREE to a worthy charitable cause, anywhere. That has been in the closet since 2001. I will wipe the hard drive, and leave the legal software on it, with Windows 98 OS. Legal means if I installed it (the software) on a newer machine, with a single license, it can not remain on the other; the free computer. Legal means legal. At discussion is freight, and we can discuss that. In question is if I can legally export it out of the US; I will find the answer when and if needed. I would be most gratified if this was out of my house, and in front of some children, in some school, somewhere, eager to learn. It is dust in my closet - BIG DUST!

Jeff

EDITED: The school / charity / cause, needs to provide their own 110 Volt A.C. Power Supply or Conversion to 110, V.A.C., for it to work.

There maybe is a 110 / 220 switch on back of the machine. If 220 is a question, I'll look.

If there is no switch, there are other options.
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Old 09-20-2007, 09:38 AM   #3
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We did the RADICAL thing. Moved a few things into storage and sold the house "as is" - with everything.

When we came home though, we had to start from scratch as we did not even own a teaspoon. That was hard, but, we found that we did not NEED all those other "things" anymore.
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Old 09-20-2007, 05:24 PM   #4
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Hey David

We have all gone through the process of dumping the house, etc and down sizing. Ain't easy that's for sure. The things we just can't do without!!

My sister and her husband did a loop around in the 70-80's I think they were gone 10+ years. They stored much of their items in a Aunt's garage. Upon returning my sister Maureen went through the garage wondering why she stored all this crap. She said here I stored a perfectly good toaster oven for 10 years and found when I came back that I could have bought the same thing in a thrift shop for a $1. The same goes with an iron, ironing board, electric coffee pot etc etc.

We used that mantra when we were trying to move out of Linda's house and still had a heck of a time.

I was lucky because I had been living onboard about 12 years before joining Linda in her house so my stuff was very minimal . I still had enough stuff to make me scratch my head "Where did this all come from?"

All depends on how long you plan to be gone. Will your weed wacker be worth storing for 10 years? Probably there will be a newer better lighter, etc model by the time you need it again

One of the things we have tried to do is to download every manual for every piece of equipment onboard to the computer. This keep the number of manuals to a few critical one. If you do better to keep good backups

Good Luck

Chuck
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Old 09-20-2007, 05:57 PM   #5
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The big question though is..."what about the tools?"

Which do you take, which do you store and which do you sell or give away???

I'm still trying to figure this one.
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Old 09-20-2007, 07:04 PM   #6
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Ahhh tools

Carry as many tools as you have space for. We have the usual compliment of sockets, spanners, vice grips etc. Anything the engine or boat needed that is unusual we carry. Like keel bolt sockets and breaker bars.

Some of our list

TOOLS

full socket set to fit the engine both metric and US

full set of box end spanners both metric and US

tap & die set

15-20 assorted screwdrivers, driver bits and punches

Numerous dental picks, scrapers, etc

Grommet punch

Numerous vice gripes, pliers, needle nose, etc. etc.

Heavy Duty Anchor Brand hand crimp for wire connectors (The expensive one ouch!)

TOOLS REQUIRING POWER

Glue gun

Drill

jig saw

Heat gun

Soldier iron

Small grinder with tiny spin on sanding pads

Router was left behind but all the router bits kept onboard

Dremel tool with all the assorted tips

This is not all but just what comes to mind

Glue Gun

We have used this more than I thought possible. From creating hems on shade cloth material being made into side curtains (when we did not have a sewing machine) to attaching all sorts of things. If we need to attach a wood gusset for a shelf to the hull. Epoxy mush is used then fiberglass tape. But holding the piece in place till it sets up is a problem. But we put a couple of dabs of hot glue on the wood along with the mush. Carefully place the piece where we want it and the hot glue dabs hold it in place until the bog kicks.

We also used door skin for making all kinds of templates for the boat before we left. I ripped the sheet into 1 1/2" strips then used the hot glue gun to attach to other door skin pieces. It works so much better than using cardboard. We bundled a dozen of these strips up and stored them up against the deck in a cockpit locker

Small Angle Grinder

It is another tool we use a lot. The large 5" wheel and safety shield is removed. We use the 3m twist on discs. They are designed to be used for a drill. We purchased the harder rubber mount attachment. We took the attachment to a machine shop and had them a fitting so we could use it on the grinder.

http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/mediawebserve...HVs6EVs6E666666--

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_U...ot=GST1T4S9TCgv

These sanding discs are really awesome and they even have these made out of scotch pads. They are easily controlled because they are so small. Use them for shaping wood, blisters on the hull, removing paint on the mast (scotch pads) etc.

So that's my 2 cents worth but as soon as I hit enter I will think of more

Chuck

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Old 09-20-2007, 07:15 PM   #7
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Darn the links didn't take. I think they were to long.

Link to the 3m attachment https://www.autobodytoolmart.com/p-11325-13869.aspx

3M™ Roloc™ Disc

http://3mindustrialtransportation.thomasne...amp;itemid=5 248

Cheers

Chuck
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Old 09-29-2007, 03:21 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trim50 View Post
The big question though is..."what about the tools?"

Which do you take, which do you store and which do you sell or give away???

I'm still trying to figure this one.
I think of all the things in the old life, the tools are the ones that adapt best to the new life. They are old friends that will stand by you through thick and thin when things break on the high seas. I had lots of tools during my circumnavigation, and I used them frequently. I probably could have cut the number of tools by a third, but it's comforting to know that you have the tools on board to deal with the most likely contingencies.
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Old 09-29-2007, 11:33 AM   #9
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I hope this helps put things in perspective or gives you some ability to cope. A few years ago I went through the absolute worst time in my life. My father died and wife filed for divorce within a months period of time. In rebellion of my dark days I decided to do something out of character and pay cash for a small Sail boat and get away from everything. I made the decision to live aboard and take on solitude as the answer for all of my problems. In my quest for answers I found the real answer " things we own actually own us". When these "possessions" become part of our lives; we as humans feel the need to horde them for sentimental reasons or self insurance of some kind of gain. I came to this reality when we were deciding who gets what during our divorce. I made the last minute decision to let her have everything, just because I did not want the confrontation and have to dedicate the time to her greed and need to argue. Instead my new love needed some attention (sailing).

After countless hours of sailing on surrounding lakes I realized I was free. I had given up everything that I held sentimental in life to the gods or the one person that I thought would stand by me, forever. Some way along the way I became lost and consumed by my possessions. There was a clarifying moment (around 12 to 15 knots) that I had where all of the depression and second guessing just disappeared. I adopted the theory it is not just a hobby, but a life style and to keep reaching.

I hope not to sound too cliché, but sailing is a life lesson, with the right tools and necessities you can do anything.

Or may be I am just saying keep the tools

Good luck and gods speed

Avast

"Something about sailing a boat brings so many senses and sensations into play that it's very difficult to pinpoint what it is, specifically, that makes me like it so much: the sight of sails and sheets overhanging the water; the foam and spray flying as the bow cuts the water; the motion of the boat; the physical and mental ballet necessay to handle the boat correctly. A sailboat might just be the most beautiful, sensuous, and intelligent blend of man/machine/elements that exists in the world today. The relationship between the three is the most harmonious I have experienced so far. Besides, you can have a beer while you do it."

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Old 09-30-2007, 12:19 AM   #10
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I have always enjoyed your humor and stories. I can't wait to hear them from your travels.
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Old 09-30-2007, 10:34 AM   #11
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I hope this helps put things in perspective or gives you some ability to cope..................

Good luck and gods speed

Avast


I concur completely!

Aye // Stephen
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Old 10-19-2007, 10:14 PM   #12
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Today I have organised a 'lawn' sale. This is the day when I actually trade in the trappings of my working life for the means to be able to sail just a little further. I have made brutal sacrifices in determining what must go and what can stay.

Divesting oneself of the accumulations which society uses to assess another person's worth is difficult. After all, amassing those accumulations has been a lifetime's habit.

On Monday I will redirect my mail, make a final payment for grid electricity, pay for and cancel the cable TV....and retire at night in my new permanent bed in a somewhat smaller, but no less comfortable bedroom.

On Tuesday I have to make a decision on how to manage my broadband access....and that, my friends, is about the biggest problem which exists in my life...and that cannot be a bad thing!

I sold my business on October the 4th last year and gave myself one year to accomplish what in fact will have taken one year and three weeks when it comes to pass on Tuesday. I am not going to shave on Wednesday morning!

David.
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Old 10-20-2007, 07:10 AM   #13
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Koooool!

I'll be right behind ya...well almost. Fortunately I've lived on the boat for several years in the past and can honestly say that I prefer it to land locked life.

Lori lived on the boat for a couple months and agrees to it being a better lifestyle.
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Old 10-23-2007, 11:23 PM   #14
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I'm smiling as I read your post and all the wonderful responses. We did store many family heirlooms and antiques when we sold the house and have encouraged family members to "take responsibility" for many of these things. It took us about 6 months to downsize all the stuff to fit in the storage unit.

However, we chucked so much stuff it was amazing. The local charities did well!

We're not on the boat yet--instead we live in a tiny studio apartment and on our little 30' sailboat. Between the two, we don't have as much space as we'll have on our cruising boat when its done--hard to believe but true.

We did keep one "little black dress" for me and one of hubby's tuxedos. I never imagined that I'd have a life where (my perfers-to-be-casual) hubby actually needed a winter and summer tux. We still have friends who have many formal parties, so his tux is in the storage unit back on the east coast. Just last month I flew back from CA to DC to attend one of these parties...the little black dress came in handy. We also kept one suit each (the "good clothes" are vac-bag packed when not in use) as we still meet with clients and will probably continue to do so off-and-on for the next couple years--we're not running away from our life that includes working in our technology business--we're just making it a smaller "contained" part of life. Sort of like when we used to take a couple weeks vacation camping, sailing, here and there, "containing" the travel time? Well, now its our goal to take a few days here and there to undertake our business matters when needed. We've been doing this, on land, for the past year, as we re-build our boat full-time. It seems to be working.

Onwards...about those tools: one major reason we went with a relatively "big" boat (54' on deck) was so we would have room for many tools. We both love doing projects, working on things, and thought it was worth it to have a larger boat and not have to limit the tools so much. We have traded in many corded tools for a set of the milwaulkee 28V tools--they're working great as part of the rebuild of our boat, so expect they'll do great on the boat for repairs, too. Yes, all the work-on-the car tools will come and many of the work-on-the-house tools, too. We are taking a small air-compressor to use with a hookah for air when we're down cleaning the hull, so we'll probably have a few of the air impact tools with us instead of leaving them behind. Its strange to use a bit-and-brace side-by-side with the air tools. Talk about technology span. The only tool that hubby feels we MUST have that I'd love to leave behind is our little bench-top mill-drill. We've fabricated car parts with it in a pinch and I imagine the need will come up on the boat to make things too--but it is soooo heavy that I hate to give up the space and weight allowance for it. Finding a good way to secure it for safe passagemaking is my biggest worry. Its small and all but dang heavy. Our boat is 28 tons gross, so what's a little more, eh?

I've had the same 1970 era Singer sewing machine for years. Its on the 30' boat right now, but I'll be setting it aside for a sailrite or similar machine that can actually go through sail Dacron. The old Singer cannot.

I'm looking forward to hearing about your travels once you get underway. And, looking forward to hearing about your projects onboard.

Take care!
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