Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > Living Aboard
Cruiser Wiki Click Here to Login

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-01-2012, 02:33 AM   #21
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,236
Default

Confined space. Make sure the location/locker whatever which contains your battery boxes is ventilated allowing that corrosive gas to exit the boat.
__________________

__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 05:43 AM   #22
Commander
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Home Port: St. Augustine FL
Vessel Name: Linnupesa
Posts: 189
Default

Rob and Bopeep

fortunately hydrogen from the over-charging is the lightest gas out there, twice lighter than helium even. So, as long as there are no domed ceilings or fixtures below or inside which it can get trapped ( and wait for you to flip that little sparky light switch ) you really are OK. It needs about a 4% level to go kaboom and a 1% one is still considered safe.

Considering how fast a kid's lost helium balloon rises you can picture those little hydrogeniters zipping up like air bubbles from an aquarium diffuser. They would be out of sight PDQ, so just keep space above the batteries open and you'll be ok.

Accidents have occurred mostly in wholly enclosed or unventilated rooms. I'd be much more concerned about Klutzenheimer dropping a metal wrench across opposing bare battery terminals. That will create some real fireworks right above the bubbly gas source and could blow a battery apart. Really bad karma, especially for unprotected eyes.

You all do use goggles when messing with your batteries, right?

Ivo K.
__________________

__________________
linnupesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 05:07 PM   #23
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,236
Default

Venting, explosion is a reason to do so, yes. But l mentioned "corrosive" as hydrogen gas can form (with other materials) hydrides (causing enbrittlement). I'm not concerned about explosion as much as I'm concerned about corrosion and damage to other boat systems. Also, hydrogen gas will set of the Carbon Monoxide detectors on the boat.

ABYC is also concerned enough about this to require action of a vent or dielectric shield above the battery. Here's a FAQ about their req.

"Q. ABYC E-10 requires that I have a 12" "Dielectric shield" above my battery for the purposes of gassing. I understand this requirement when installing traditional "Lead Acid" type batteries, however, I am installing gel-type batteries and do not see the need for this spacing.
A. First, E-10 does not differentiate between traditional (lead-acid) and newer types of batteries (gel) that minimize or eliminate hydrogen gassing. Keep in mind that a battery is not permanent. At some point in time, the unit will have to be replaced. Generally these batteries are replaced with what the owner can afford or what the owner finds is available at the time. The suggested method of installation found in E-10 takes into account this common situation. Since hydrogen gassing can affect most materials used in component construction (e.g. aluminum cases on chargers/inverters, fuel lines) the standard calls for the 12" of dielectric shielding."
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 05:51 PM   #24
Commander
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Home Port: St. Augustine FL
Vessel Name: Linnupesa
Posts: 189
Default

OK, points noted. The dielectric shields are I believe primarily for the prevention of shorts, hence need for the dielectric. Now once the hydrogen passed the shield, then what? It doesn't get neutralized or absorbed by the shield. The corrosion imho is likely more from the sulphuric acid vapors that kinda come along with the fizz and pop of the bubbles. Perhaps the shield is a splash-guard as well ? Short-term hydrogen gas by itself I believe is not very deleterious to metal. Except when packed into a hydrogen bomb, of the variety "nucular" as they say in Texas.
__________________
linnupesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 07:10 PM   #25
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,236
Default

sorry for sloppy typing above OR should be vent AND shield. You're right on about preventing shorts. I'd thought that FAQ I'd copied included vent info, sorry.

Regarding ventilation for batteries, my own issue remains degradation of (metallic) materials in the boat whereas the regulatory/industry standards are focused on the explosion potential. Here is a link about hydrogen damage to metals http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_damage

--for USA owners of boats, here is the US Coast Guard requirements for battery installations and the NFPA requirements. Both require vent system to discharge hydrogen gas but don't get into details.

USCG
33 CFR Sec. 183.420 Batteries.
"(a) Each installed battery must not move more than one inch in any direction when a pulling force of 90 pounds or twice the battery weight, whichever is less, is applied through the center of gravity of the battery as follows:
<(1) Vertically for a duration of one minute.
(2) Horizontally and parallel to the boat's center line for a duration of one minute fore and one minute aft.
(3) Horizontally and perpendicular to the boat's center line for a duration of one minute to starboard and one minute to port.
(b) Each battery must be installed so that metallic objects cannot come in contact with the ungrounded battery terminals.
(c) Each metallic fuel line and fuel system component within 12 inches and above the horizontal plane of the battery top surface as installed must be shielded with dielectric material.
(d) Each battery must not be directly above or below a fuel tank, fuel filter, or fitting in a fuel line.
(e) A vent system or other means must be provided to permit the discharge from the boat of hydrogen gas released by the battery.
(g) Each battery terminal connector must not depend on spring tension for its mechanical connection to the terminal."


NFPA 302-7.3
“A vent system or other means shall be provided to allow the discharge from the boat of hydrogen gas released by the battery. Battery boxes with a cover that forms a pocket over the battery shall be vented.”
“Batteries shall be secured to provide immobilization to the extent practicable.”
“Batteries shall be located in a liquid tight tray or battery box of adequate capacity to retain normal spillage or boilover of electrolytes. The tray shall be constructed of or lined with materials resistant to deterioration by the electrolytes.”
“A non conductive, perforated cover or other means shall be provided to prevent accidental shorting of the ungrounded battery terminals and cell conductors.”
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2012, 09:21 PM   #26
Commander
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Home Port: St. Augustine FL
Vessel Name: Linnupesa
Posts: 189
Default

Cher BeBopAloola

thanks for the links. Mine eyes hathed glazeth over well even before I got to the "pitch-catch mode shear wave velocity" part. ( That's just after the "creeping wave" bit in wikipedia )

So yes, "Yeah, slimy things did crawl upon a slimy sea" and my apologies if I hath mis-quothed the "Ancient Mariner" and Chaucer or whoever penned that. Been up since 4:30am, it's been a long wild day so far. I'm hors de combat and crawling off the field!
__________________
linnupesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2012, 01:42 AM   #27
Admiral
 
haiqu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Home Port: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Shenoa
Posts: 1,554
Default

Experiences after a month aboard:

Struggled by with one tired 100Ah battery until last week, when I replaced it with a pair of brand new Century Marine Pro AGPs. I have two panels totaling 180W of charging capacity and find that by 11am the controller is blinking - indicating excess charging capacity available - but currently I'm being very frugal with external lights due to being on a swing mooring.

I've ordered two new 80W panels to bring the total to three, and the 100W panel that came with the boat will be going to Brisbane to be fitted to Shenoa, the Hartley Tasman I bought a fortnight ago. I'll also be fitting a 100W wind generator to supplement these.

The batteries can be used individually via an A/B switch or, as I'm doing now, in parallel (A+B.) When used individually they charge more efficiently because the solar panels work best at 17.6V and that can't be achieved while they're loaded down. This feature may be useful in lower latitudes such as Tasmania.

While I haven't yet tested the theoretical limits outlined in my original post, I have been using a PC for up to 6 hours a day, LED lighting for 4 hours, TV for 2 hours, as well as charging 18650 batteries (e-cigarette), battery drill and phone. The macerator head and pressurized shower also run off 12 volts. The inverters are being used occasionally for 240V things like my soldering iron and jigsaw.

It all seems to work, so I'm happy.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water... sweat, tears, or the sea" -- Isak Dinesen

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: All sections
haiqu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 12:13 PM   #28
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Home Port: Cheyenne, WY
Vessel Name: CAREFREE
Posts: 55
Send a message via Skype™ to gts1544
Default

haiqu, I don't know if this non-technical blurb will be of any help, but here goes. We have a Beneteau 41 down in the BVI's that sees about 9 months of use annually. We have an icebox that has been converted to a 12V refrigerator. One of our group is an EE and he recommended a solid state controlled South West Wind Power Air Breeze 12V wind turbine to keep our 2 AGM 12V house batteries topped off. With our constant tradewinds, it works like a champ! gts1544
AIR Breeze | Southwest Windpower
__________________
gts1544 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 04:35 PM   #29
Commander
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Home Port: St. Augustine FL
Vessel Name: Linnupesa
Posts: 189
Default

GTS

Your operative words there are "topped off", "converted ice-box refrigerator" ( i.e. fairly small ) and "constant tradewinds".

It behooves everyone considering renewable energy to "consider the sources". Anecdotal info is good but often quite misleading to newcomers to the field as some critical caveats get lost in the message.

Wind-power is great. You can have it 24/7 and even a small turbine will deliver 3-7A at charging voltages for a 12V system. Sounds ideal, right? The proviso is to get any usable power you definitely will already be aware of the wind, like in "yes, it's windy". Better yet, it is already doing some whistling in the lines and you hear the halyards slapping the mast. That sound means you might be getting upwards of 3A. For full output you will need a good 12-15kn blow or more.

In tradewind areas that is not an unreasonable expectation, yet other locations may get such conditions only 5% of the time. Don't expect your fridge to stay cool there.

Solar cells: Similar issues. Great with clear skies and long days in low latitudes. Fog, heavy clouds or short daylight hours will get you only 5-30% of the potential output.

Having a triad of solar/wind/diesel is probably the safest approach. While away from the boat one or the other of the first two options will keep batteries and an anchor light going 24/7, in almost any location. When aboard the diesel genset does the rest and there are some very small and compact ones available.

Cloudy dark skies usually means some wind for your windmill but if that too fails you run the diesel genset. No, NOT your engine but a generator. Your typical alternator on an idling engine will hardly put out worthwhile current. Only at 1200-1500 rpm will you get the 30A or more that you typically need. ( my engine alternator at 1000rpm puts out almost zero amps, yet 50A+ above 1500 revs ) You can cover your bases further with a towable or prop-generator but that of course means your boat or waters must be moving.

It is not easy running on alternative energies but it can be done very well with good planning and alternative sources. The technologies certainly are getting there but the critical players still are wind and sun. They may not always play your game.

What is often overlooked is efficiency of the various components. Better fridge insulation, top opening freezer doors, reduced numbers of openings, color, LED vs incandescent lights. All these affect the energy budget. A few critical changes there and you may find you can make things work when previously you could not.

BTW: both my boat and home are solar/wind powered for years already. The home is on solar only, in fact it was built using only solar energy. ( Jack-hammer, Skilsaws, nailers, staplers etc.)

While it sure helped having a career in electronics "green energy" can be done by other mortals too and I'll be glad to help you with your conundrums. Bzzzt PiFFF... aaargh!

Ivo on s/v Linnupesa
__________________
linnupesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2012, 11:51 PM   #30
Admiral
 
haiqu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Home Port: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Shenoa
Posts: 1,554
Default

Useful comments Ivo. Green energy isn't mainstream even for us electronics guys, it's a separate field entirely. It's a philosophy and a technology rolled into one.

As an anecdote, I'd like to tell you about a friend of mine who is a property developer. He's 26 and owns a portfolio of around $6M of rental properties. I floored him one day by pointing out that if he sold it all he would barely have enough to buy ONE coastal property in Sydney. Then a few months later I emailed him and mentioned that I'd bought a coastal "property" for $5,100 that was surrounded by $6M houses. He nearly had kittens until I explained that it was a yacht.

There are two ways to become rich. One is to work hard and acquire assets, the other is to reduce one's needs to a reasonable level. This fits in well with the Green Energy philosophy. I'd LIKE to have kept my V12 BMW but what I really needed - and bought to replace it - was a 1994 VW Transporter van on LPG. I'd LIKE to live in a mansion on the coast, but I get the same view from the boat at peanuts on the dollar. I'd LIKE to have refrigeration, but UHT milk tastes just as good and lasts years on the shelf.

Many of the new possibilities open to yachties are now changing our world. Solar panels at $1.55 a watt, controllers for $10 each, LED lights and many other products have made living on a shoestring possible. What a great time to retire and leave the rat race. :-)

Rob
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water... sweat, tears, or the sea" -- Isak Dinesen

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: All sections
haiqu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2012, 03:02 AM   #31
Commander
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Home Port: St. Augustine FL
Vessel Name: Linnupesa
Posts: 189
Default

Haiqu

thank you for your kind comment. But, but, but... you forgot to mention the cheap terminal health care options that are open to yachties everywhere in the world and only a step away... just over the railings.

Agreed then, less can be more but as you say this is often difficult to digest for a lot of peeps. Or results in a litany of having kittens!

The point I was trying to get across is that we should not take the "let us throw a pill at it" approach when looking at green energy. It does require a more holistic tack and perhaps even a certain kind or change in philosophy. Too often I read of people embracing solar or a wind charger as the pill to solve their problems. Sometimes it works (as some pills do) but more likely a lifestyle change or do-over is required, from A to Z. Only then does that pill become really effective.

Case in point: a local municipality here adopted solar panels for a "going green" project. Not to mention basking in the accolades of the adoring public. Yet, their location is totally unsuited for solar, as even in summer the area is often blanketed in fog or clouds. Hello, anyone home?

Don't get me started on the supposedly "green" plug-in cars. As if that power-cord attaches right to the sun, ya think? Unfortunately a lot of the green agenda has been hi-jacked by industry that offers a pseudo-green solution to which we get suckered in.

Uwe, a fellow Krautzenheimer on Aquarius, uses an electric motor on his boat, which is quite commendable in principle. It is good to have such pioneers out in front of the herd but it pays for them to also look behind to see if the herd is still following. ( My apologies Uwe, I try to remain universally insulting, with no bias to creed or whatever )

While a lot of new tech has brought great benefits we should not lose sight that some of the old stuff still gives us the biggest bang for the buck. Like it or not, that includes diesel and lead-acid batteries. We need to look at efficiencies, see things clearly and in context and not just blindly stumble along behind some mantra of the principle.

Did I really say all that? Ouchies! But back to solar.. yes, it usually works and I'd highly recommend at least a pilot project for everyone with a live-aboard or at anchor boat. It won't do your cooking or air conditioning but you'll be surprised by how much it can do with so little effort, reliably, quietly and day after day.

Ivo on s/v Linnupesa ( 2x130W panels, wind/water gen and 5kW diesel genset. The shore power cord last used in '03 is going to e-bay )
__________________
linnupesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2012, 05:35 AM   #32
Admiral
 
haiqu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Home Port: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Shenoa
Posts: 1,554
Default

As a pragmatist and long-term cheapskate (I've always been poor) there's no way I'll be investing in technology that doesn't work. Local councils are notoriously dense, as are national governments for that matter. Here in Sydney the sun shines enough for it to be practical even without a generator, so long as I don't expect to run aircon (never did like it and my whole family are fridgies!) Cooking - including making coffee - is still done best using gas.

If old stuff works it stays, which is why I'll use a wood plane or spokeshave any day over getting some timber yard to dress my cabin rails for me. Elbow grease is cheap and keeps me off the computer, saving even more energy.

As for electric propulsion, I'm still not convinced but if LiFePO4 batteries comes down to about 50% of their current price it might be worthwhile. The electronics and motors are already at a price point I'd buy. Still, a Chinese V2 diesel is also an option.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water... sweat, tears, or the sea" -- Isak Dinesen

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: All sections
haiqu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 12:01 AM   #33
Admiral
 
haiqu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Home Port: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Shenoa
Posts: 1,554
Default

Here's the latest version of my analysis, which has been constantly evolving since I've been living aboard. I don't have some of these items installed yet but it takes into account all future loads that I might be using, including a fridge:

240 volt power Rating Usage Notes
=================================================

Soldering iron 40W 4 Uses 150W inverter
Printer 60W 5 Navigation charts
Oscilloscope 40W 4 Repairs
Microwave 700W 35 3 min/day reheating food
Power Tools 1000W 80 Grinder, jigsaw, drill

Total 240V power 128 Watt Hours


12 volt power Rating Usage Notes
=================================================

Radios (standby) 5W 80 CB, Ham, VHF and/or HF
Radios (transmit) 50W 25 30 min/day @ 50W avg.
Autohelm 2000 10W 80 Uses 5A intermittently
Chargers 20W 40 Phone, battery drill, e-cigs
Notebook PC 40W 160 Navigation, internet, TV
Shower 90W 3 2 min/day avg.
Fridge / freezer 96W 188 Eutectic system
Toilet pump 150W 5 Macerator
Bilge pump 240W 20 Normally unused
Engine starter 1200W 0 Recharges batteries

Total 12V power 601 Watt Hours


12 volt lights Rating Usage Notes
=================================================

External lights 30W 360 Mast and running lights
Cabin Lights 30W 240 LEDs 8 hrs/day

Total 12V lights 600 Watt Hours


=================================================
Total power and lights 1329 Watt Hours MAXIMUM TOTAL
=================================================

Input
=====

3 x 80W solar panels + 1 x 100W wind generator = 1360 Watt Hours (est. 4H per day average)


Battery
=======

2 x 12V 100AH = 2400 Watt Hours available


The total power usage and capacity of the battery and solar panels match pretty well, although more battery power would be advisable for redundancy when out on the ocean. Around the harbour this setup should be adequate.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water... sweat, tears, or the sea" -- Isak Dinesen

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: All sections
haiqu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 01:54 AM   #34
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,876
Default

You are obviously a knowledgeable sparky type and I seek your advice. I have a Freedom 10 inverter/charger, powered by 2, 85 watt solar panels and an Air Marine wind gen .The Freedom 10 is of the modified, rather than pure, sine wave type.

Is it safe to run a laptop computer direct from the power supply, or should I use the supply only to charge the laptop battery, to then power the computer independent of the inverter?
__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 02:33 AM   #35
Commander
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Home Port: St. Augustine FL
Vessel Name: Linnupesa
Posts: 189
Default

Yeeees Auzzie, you called?

Charge the battery by itself. It acts as a giant capacitor and will absorb SOME power/voltage surges.

Your laptop should already come designed with a little surge and spike protection, but those are the shoulda/woulda/coulda/wishda items.

Modified sine wave can mean anything up to a square wave, or on-off pulses even. Square waves have notorious voltage overshoot or spikes, which tend to kill simple lap-top protection circuits. The AVERAGE converter voltage may be regulated quite well but the few milliseconds of double or more spike and harmonic over-voltage does the damage.

Of course, you'd really like to run the 'puter with the battery in place. For that you'd want a more fancy SURGE and SPIKE filter, designed for that exact purpose and placed between the source and unit.

I'm not sure if you are running a DC-source to your battery or a small AC-DC converter, fed by your wanna-be sine-wave AC source. The filter mentioned would help the AC become cleaner by removing the objectionable spikes. Rob or I can tell you how to make a real cheap filter too, out of junk parts, and so can google.

Your battery itself doesn't care whether it's charged by pulses or sine or pure DC, as long as it gets a reasonable charging current with the right polarity.

Happy holly-daze there down under, go easy with the sauce! ( Sorry, I forget you are Oz, silly me! )

Ivo

PS: A clamp-on ferrite choke or a few simple knots tied into the AC-cord may be enough help already. The knots act to slow down the electrons as they have to run the corners. Of course, being Oz electrons they try to keep their beer from spilling, so clutch it more tightly and slow down a bit. Ergo, lowered voltage.
Rob will explain the MOV's and pi filters you'll find on google under filters and spikes.
__________________
linnupesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 04:04 AM   #36
Moderator
 
delatbabel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 699
Send a message via AIM to delatbabel
Default

The only thing I'll add to the already posted above good advice is for steel and to a lesser extent ferro/cement boats.

Being a steel boat owner under no circumstances would I trust or use an inverter/charger. You absolutely want to have no electrical connections at all between on-shore AC earth and on-board AC earth. Run the charger into the batteries and run the inverter off the charger.
__________________
= New South Wales, Queensland,
delatbabel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 06:32 AM   #37
Admiral
 
haiqu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Home Port: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Shenoa
Posts: 1,554
Default

Xantrex (the makers of your inverter) have a page that answers some of those questions:

http://www.xantrex.com/documents/Tec...-Universal.pdf

The answer I can provide from personal experience is that I've been using my laptop - an IBM ThinkPad - running off a 150W modified sine wave car cigarette lighter inverter for a year with no ill effects.

There are various web pages that list the devices that MIGHT have trouble. In the main I haven't noticed any issues yet using two different types of modified sine inverters, the abovementioned 150W unit and a 1000W brick that I fitted to the boat.

Most of the time these days I'm running it off the house batteries via an inverter charger (12V-to-18V) specially designed for the ThinkPad, and if you can find something like that you're laughing. It's also the most efficient method since you're not going 12V-240V-18V via multiple adapters.

As a backup system I tested out the possibility of charging it directly from the solar panels and with the right connector this gets the laptop to about 60% charge. So if the whole charging system crashes I still have navigation available at least.

While Ivo's waffling about spikes and filters is theoretically interesting, the plugpack core will effectively kill all that stuff before it gets to your PC. It just doesn't have the bandwidth to pass any RF through.

Rob
__________________

__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water... sweat, tears, or the sea" -- Isak Dinesen

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: All sections
haiqu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
From Bareboat To Full Load: What Does It All Weigh rgesner General Cruising Forum 10 03-01-2012 02:24 AM
Severe weather analysisfeb. 15, 2012issued 10:25 a.m. Est StormW "StormW's" Daily Weather Synopsis 0 02-15-2012 03:39 PM
Electrical Problems And Propane Don't Mix redbopeep General Cruising Forum 6 11-12-2010 07:14 PM
I Need An Electrical Guru JeanneP Power & Electronics 17 07-07-2007 02:35 AM
Water Turbine Driven Electrical Generator Harbor_Pilot Other Equipment 11 03-03-2007 11:57 AM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0
×