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Old 11-24-2010, 04:52 PM   #15
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Wet blanket here. Sorry I'm so late entering the discussion, but I've been under the weather for the past 2-1/2 weeks!

Linseed oil is a dangerous substance to put near heat, be it on the stove or a heat gun. Please read up on it Wikipedia on Linseed oil and don't boil it, please! Nowadays linseed oil is usually sold as "boiled", with the addition of chemical dryers. It will dry faster and better than heating it.

Peter's father was a chemist who bought into a paint company in order to have his own laboratory to develop his own formulas back before WWII. He was experimenting with linseed oil, the base for most paints back then, and was heating it in a very large vat. At a certain temperature the linseed oil will generate its own heat and ignite. Well, that's what happened to this giant vat of linseed oil, with a flame merrily burning on its surface. Somebody called the fire department, who came rushing in with their hoses ready to "put out the fire". The hoses would have spread burning linseed oil throughout the factory floor and probably burned the place to the ground. My father-in-law stood them down as he worked at reducing the temperature of the oil and thus stop the fire. That entailed removing the heat source (naturally) and pouring in cold linseed oil to bring down the temperature. You can imagine the horror of the firemen watching him add fuel to the fire. Disconcerting when the fire went out.

Anyway, linseed oil demands a great deal of respect. Please be careful, not just lucky.
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Old 11-25-2010, 08:43 AM   #16
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Jeanne,

Being the grandson of a master woodworker and having very hard and fast rules laid in on how one deals with that wonderful oil (it is one of the best for many types of wood). I can understand your views well; I tend to go the waxed cotton?fabric method working with some of the compounds that can be bought for treating these fabrics and using them to make section of cloth up to par with the treatments, will have to look a few of them up (they are stored in a cold part of the house when not in use). I also know of a place where you can buy waxed cotton of different weight and treatment levels and will look them up as well and post. Natural fibers do have some down sides but also have a few serious up sides as well or modern synthetics. Matter of fact here are a few:

Here

and Here

Well made and cared for waxed cotton will out last the person who bought it or made it by a generation or two (sometimes three) and is well worth the investment.

Michael
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Old 11-25-2010, 02:01 PM   #17
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Off topic, but another one of my bouts of reminiscing.

We love linseed oil. Back when we were respectable members of the working world, we restored Victorian row houses in Boston. The wood in them was sometimes exquisite, and to this day I regret leaving one of the doors in the building after we left the area.

We always cleaned and oiled the old wooden hand rails and balusters, and many other black walnut and mahogany woodwork. The "rule" for oiling wood with linseed oil was, "once a day for a week; once a week for a month; once a month for a year; once a year forever. The depth of finish and grain could not be duplicated with varnish.
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Old 12-05-2010, 02:34 AM   #18
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hmm... any tips on the smell? it's been well over a week now. The jacket looks great but it still smells strongly of linsee... It's been hanging outside airing the hole time, but when you bring it in the room is permeated with the smell in a matter of minutes... I wouldn't have thought it would take this long to air out.
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Old 12-06-2010, 11:10 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atavist View Post

hmm... any tips on the smell? it's been well over a week now. The jacket looks great but it still smells strongly of linsee... It's been hanging outside airing the hole time, but when you bring it in the room is permeated with the smell in a matter of minutes... I wouldn't have thought it would take this long to air out.
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:29 PM   #20
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The beeswax generally helps absorb the smelliness. That's the other reason that some folks prefer orange oil to offset the linseed oil smell. If you'd put a dash of Stockholm tar in there, now you'd really have a strong "boat-y" smell!
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Old 06-15-2011, 09:55 PM   #21
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Just a thought, try contacting the Forbo company in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland. They make Marmoleum flooring, the new "green" material. It is actually rebrand of linoleum. The primary ingredient is linsead oil. They must have a way to keep the finished product from feeling tacky. And besides, you may find a whole new market for their product...green foul weather gear.
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