Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > The Bosun's Locker > Repairs & Maintenance
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-01-2008, 12:45 PM   #1
Ensign
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3
Default

I'm looking for for wood strips that are 1/4 to 1/2 inch think and 2 inches wide. (Pics from another boat). Jolly Dolphin has the wood strips along the in the v-berth, but I don't know where I can purchase it. I was hoping to put it behind the settees to cover the cork. I would appreciate any information you could give me. Thanks.

falmouthcutter22

wood.jpg
Attached Images
File Type: jpg wood2.jpg (55.2 KB, 72 views)
__________________

__________________
falmouthcutter22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 01:06 PM   #2
Retired Mod
 
Lighthouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Home Port: Durban
Posts: 2,984
Default

Where are you located?
__________________

__________________


The World Cruising & Sailing Wiki

Help to build this free, online World Cruising Guide.

"Built by cruisers, for cruisers''

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: Most sections
Lighthouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 01:27 PM   #3
Ensign
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post
Where are you located?
North Coast- Bergen Conty New Jersey
__________________
falmouthcutter22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2008, 04:03 PM   #4
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

Do a Google search for "wood laths". I think you'll find something that way.
__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 01:16 AM   #5
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Post

Hi,

That's a very pretty wood "ceiling" that you're showing in the pics. Its funny that in a boat the "walls" are called "ceiling" and the whats above is called "overhead"...

Typically, you end up making these strips yourself from your material of choice--and width of choice. They'll usually be from 3/8" thick to 1" thick and the width may be from 1.5" up to 4"; the wider widths are more difficult to fit since you end up custom cutting them quite a bit for the curve of the boat. No matter how wide, there will be a custom fit because boats aren't square boxes You might wish to pick up a book by Bud Macintosh called "How to Build a Wooden Boat" that happens to have good info on joinery and ceilings too.

If you have a tablesaw, you could easily work with 2" (8/4) x whatever width wood stock--you lay that board flat on the table saw, run it through "ripping" your strips to be 2" wide by say 1/2" thick (or whatever thickness you want). Like cutting slices of bread from a loaf. What's nice about using 8/4 stock is that it is relatively cheap, usually its flat sawn (see grain pattern on face) and you end up with the nicer vertical grain once you've sliced it perpendicular. Depending on the saw and the particular wood chosen, you might have to then run it through a planer to get a smooth surface on one side. Also, typically, the edges are "eased" with a hand plane or run through a router with a round over bit. You could do the "ripping" with a good bandsaw as well--but even though a table saw wastes more wood, its faster.

So, lets say you don't want to do that ripping work...figure out what kind of wood you want (teak, cedar, mahogany?) and go in search of that wood. You'll want "clear" stock, btw. Typically the stores that sell these types of wood also offer millwork services and you can specify what you want. So, you'd be buying your wood from them, lets say 8/4 x random widths x random lengths and having it cut to 8/4 (2") x 1/2" strips. Since they charge for every pass through a machine and you'll be hand fitting these into your boat which will require some custom cuts by you anyway, it might be most cost effective for you to pick up a hand plane to ease the edges. Also, you'll tell them that only one side will be seen so they'll only finish that side to the smoothness you need for a good painted or varnished finish.

If there's a Dixieline lumber near you, they'll likely be able to do the millwork but will not have the wood you want. You can usually take the wood you've bought elsewhere into the Dixieline and they'll cut if for you for a price per linear foot. Cabinet shops might be able to get you the wood. You'll find local shops that can do the milling work if you look in the yellow pages for "millwork" or under "lumber milling." Lumber yards usually can do it--but again, you have to find a good marine quality clear wood to start with. While teak is commonly used, it is costly and actually more difficult to keep a varnished finish on teak than some other rot resistant and pretty woods. Teak, purpleheart, silver bali, sapele, all kinds of mahogany, alaskan yellow cedar, port orford cedar...there are many woods that can be used for ceilings and overheads.

Good luck to you!

Some pics of us "milling" for our own Alaskan Yellow Cedar overhead:



we started with 8/4 x 6" x random lenghts 10ft -19ft and cut 3" wide x 3/4" thick--so a cut vertical and a cut horizontal then passes through the planer; yes that's lots of sawdust because we also used a dado blade to remove extra wood allow us to "spline" the boards together.



the overhead, looking up from below
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 01:17 AM   #6
Admiral
 
MMNETSEA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,067
Default

Hi,

Since you are in New Jersey , try this outfit , they are not too far away :-

TIMBER

Richard
__________________
MMNETSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 01:26 PM   #7
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

A few other suggestions. Have you looked for beadboard? wainscoting? (84 Lumber used to supply). How about advertisers in Wooden Boat Magazine? Or Good Old Boat mag?

Back when we restored historic buildings we used to find lots of our material from condemned buildings nearby. Looking at the derelicts yards in Port Elizabeth and Staten Island, I wonder if there's such a source for boats.
__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2008, 03:35 PM   #8
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeanneP View Post
A few other suggestions. Have you looked for beadboard? wainscoting? (84 Lumber used to supply). How about advertisers in Wooden Boat Magazine? Or Good Old Boat mag?

Back when we restored historic buildings we used to find lots of our material from condemned buildings nearby. Looking at the derelicts yards in Port Elizabeth and Staten Island, I wonder if there's such a source for boats.
I love the look of t&g beadboard On the east coast of the US, even Home Depot carries yellow pine beadboard and sometimes oak as well. Typically it is milled with two "boards" per board (looks like 2 of them but is only one wide board) and is tongue and groove. It is a great thing to use on inside bulkheads of a boat or an "overhead." However, on the hull, unless one is installing this on a very flat section, it would be almost impossible to use a pre-milled t&g board and have it fit properly; also difficult to use the "double board" widths of 3, 4, and more inches that the beadboard is sold in.

Even though your ceiling (we assume) is non-structural, installing a ceiling in a boat is almost like planking the boat to get the lines right and have it end up good looking is a little tricky. Seriously consider picking up a boatbuilding manual to peruse. The reason I mention the McIntosh one is that there's a whole chapter on ceilings and putting them in.

If you use Google Local (local.google.com) putting in the terms millwork and New Jersey, you'll get a couple thousand "hits" of lumber and millwork places, too.

We'll look forward to hearing about what you found and what you did with your ceiling
__________________

__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Off Shore Improvements cd30ketch Repairs & Maintenance 1 12-13-2008 04:33 AM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0