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Old 08-21-2012, 12:07 PM   #15
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Also done Chesapeake to Long Island via the Delaware and there are some good stretches where you have to go out into the big sea, notably Cape St May to New York and in a 50 footer that took nearly 2 days.

Saying all that I loved it especially the Bourbon, we seemed to find a local brew in every port some that didnot appear too legal![/QUOTE]



I did a slog of a sail on the Chesapeake with some friends who chartered in Island Packet in August a couple years ago. We burned some fossil fuel that week.

Since my post I found Home in addition to some of the links shared above. Plenty of resources to research before we leave.

Revising the budget every week - adjusting for the life we are leaving behind and the blue trail ahead.
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Old 08-21-2012, 12:12 PM   #16
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"Saying all that I loved it especially the Bourbon, we seemed to find a local brew in every port some that didnot appear too legal!"

And therein lies the essence of the cruising spirit.
Good on yer, mate!
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Old 08-21-2012, 03:03 PM   #17
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Annapolis to Chesapeake City was an awful passage for us gale force winds on the nose and very heavy sea state and tricky channel with bis barges around the corner, thank goodness we had full AIS and knew what was coming a few hairy moments avoiding the big ones in the narrows! Saying that the bargees were great and called us up telling us where and when to pass.
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Old 08-21-2012, 03:06 PM   #18
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That must have been hairy - skinny waters and not a lot of room to play with those big boats.
Noted: GPS chartplotter with AIS enabled. CHECK!
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Old 08-31-2012, 09:23 AM   #19
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Reference inflatable dinghys! The #1 enemy of the inflatable is sun, so either look for a more recent model that meets your need or be able to verify that the older model that seems a good bargain has been stored under adequate cover. Once the decision is made, I strongly recommend a dinghy cover, either a full storage cover or perhaps more useful, a tube cover that allows usage while covered. Best of luck!
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Old 08-31-2012, 11:31 AM   #20
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Great tip - thank you!

Also - with regards to navigation websites, a friend pointed me to activecaptain.com which appears to be an excellent resource. The laptop (pc) version is free and I played with it before buying the app for my iPad ($24.95). I will be playing with this during a short (8 day) local trip this week.
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Old 09-05-2012, 10:02 PM   #21
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Caribe makes a great 8' roll up dinghy that we used for the first 5 years we were cruising - David made a 3 point bridle so we could hoist it on deck with the spare main halyard and a winch, then deflate it and roll it up. Reverse the process for inflating. It was a pain, but doable. We never tow it, the only time we did, we caught an ICW wake, flipped the dinghy and had to do a man-overboard drill to retrieve the oars.

Also, if you're thinking sun shower, consider a Duck Pressure Solar Shower -- click to see it ... essentially it's nothing more than a black container pump up type bug sprayer adapted with a shower type fitting, but ours has worked wonderfully for the past five years. We have no affiliation with the company other than satisfied customers. Other cruisers have made their own, but for the price and convenience, we just ordered one.

Enjoy! Jan
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:52 PM   #22
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Thanks for the tip on Caribe roll up - and on the shower. Noted!
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Old 12-27-2012, 09:48 PM   #23
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Homeland Security will give you a hard time at every port, since you have to call them every time you move? It is a total nightmare! I was planning to do that but change my mind after reading few comments/articles.
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Old 12-28-2012, 01:17 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptDinghy View Post
About this time in 2013, my wife and I are planning to sail from Maine to Florida and beyond. Mostly ICW on the way down.

The outline of our current plan is in development. Right now we plan to overnight at anchor or moorings 4-5 days and in a marina 1-2per week to re-provision and get a hot shower (no shower aboard our Sabre 28). Work our way down to Beaufort and then beyond over the winter of 2013-14.

As a broad question, is there ONE resource that can provide a list of decent anchorages and marinas for the East Coast?

Also - we have to acquire a tender. With limited space on our foredeck, is it practical to think we can tow it for the entire cruise? Should we look at davits? Expect it will be a sailing/rowing dinghy - don't want the added maintenance of an outboard. Maybe a Portland Pudgy as it is not too long - though not that pretty to look at and I have not tried to row one so a test drive is needed.

Hoping to do as much on the Pardy - shoestring model as we can since we don't have tons of cash in the bank and we are planning to keep our house (and its mortgage).

I guess this is a lot more than 1 question . . .
/Look for Active Captain. The virtual Cruising Guide. Much info on Anchorages and Marinas and much more.
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:08 PM   #25
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Quote:
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As a broad question, is there ONE resource that can provide a list of decent anchorages and marinas for the East Coast?
There is a new ICW anchorage guide from the Managing the Waterway site

It's new so I haven't used it, but I think you will find it very useful.

I like free, and when we set off in 1986 I had pages and pages of culled notes on places to stop, anchorages, etc. However cruising guides were a tremendous help to us. We loved our first trip down the ICW, but it is a slow, expensive way to get south. And if you need practice with offshore sailing, hopping in and out of the ICW to sail most of the coast is a great way to gain experience.

Some hints:
Go inside to avoid Cape Hatteras. There's a reason that area has a Cape Fear.

Watch the weather carefully, listen to the USCG notices to mariners daily, and pay attention. We could very easily have ended our first trip south when I didn't listen carefully enough to the notices and came very close to hitting a derelict ship off the NJ coast.

If you're offshore to avoid the Georgia ICW (which I recommend), re-enter the ICW at Fernandina Beach, NOT Jacksonville. Much safer, calmer, and far less big ship traffic as well as a nice anchorage right inside.

The ICW was intended as a safe haven from bad weather for commercial vessels, particularly barges, traversing the coast. I suggest that sailboats in particular use it the same way - in good weather, sail offshore; in bad weather come inside for shelter and safe(r) traveling.

There are so many big power boats heading south for the winter with clueless inconsiderate owner skippers that you are going to be rocked and rolled a lot. Of course, too often the problem facing faster power boats passing sailboats is that some sailboats blindly insist on "maintain(ing) course and speed" when the smart thing is for the sailboat to move over as far as possible and reduce speed dramatically to allow the power boat to pass at a lower speed. The faster the power boat has to go to pass you, the bigger the wake.

I've used Active Captain and it can be very helpful. But it isn't as comprehensive as other sources yet, though with input from cruisers it's getting better.

Dinghy. For most of our cruising we used an Achilles inflatable dinghy with inflatable floor. We never towed it, even when we were just doing a day sail. We had a 12V inflator pump that made easy work of inflating the dinghy - it's a high volume, low pressure pump and the high pressure manual air pump is best for finishing off the inflation process.
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:16 PM   #26
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Quote:
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Homeland Security will give you a hard time at every port, since you have to call them every time you move? It is a total nightmare! I was planning to do that but change my mind after reading few comments/articles.
Without going into the politics of fear, you're right that Homeland Security can be annoying for foreign yachts. However, it is only a phone call. I can't see that as a major deterrent to traveling the ICW for foreign yachts. I think you'll find it's not nearly as difficult as some reports make it seem.
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Old 12-28-2012, 07:50 PM   #27
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Hi Capt Dinghy/Rob(?)

The call-in requirement and only for foreign flagged vessels is really more for each of their jurisdiction areas. It is a do-able hassle if you ask where next you need to report in, as it may be a lot farther than you think, rather than at each port of call.

ICW: speaking only for the Beaufort NC to NY stretch of ICW, I found I could always anchor out with little difficulty. Came inshore for fuel at Barnegat only. Waves on the Chessie/Delaware Bay and even Albemarle Sound can be quite nasty with a strong wind, the open sea is almost nicer once you can get into 100' or deeper waters.

If on a tight budget you certainly can skip all the marinas and anchor out. A very good place to provision is at Great Bridge, a few miles S of Norfolk and just below the lock. There is a free pier on either side of the opening bridge and usually there is a free spot too for overniters. A variety of shopping or eats are in walking distance, so is wifi and a library is not far away either.

Clearly that town is transients friendly and should be supported with our business, unlike say St. Augustine et al which put out excessively extensive city-owned mooring fields. Transient boats there are considered to be meal tickets only and to be fleeced to the utmost.

Ivo on s/v Linnupesa
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