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Old 10-26-2008, 04:51 PM   #1
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I've heated my home with wood for the last 10 year and now want to put a small woodstove on my boat. The boat is big enough. And it had a wood stove before. I am just wondering if there is anything I should know, like major difference between woodstove on land and on a boat. I will be looking for the woodstove itself and the pipes. I have the piece of hardware to fit the pipe through the hull which is fero-cement by the way.
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Old 10-26-2008, 07:30 PM   #2
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I've heated my home with wood for the last 10 year and now want to put a small woodstove on my boat. The boat is big enough. And it had a wood stove before. I am just wondering if there is anything I should know, like major difference between woodstove on land and on a boat. I will be looking for the woodstove itself and the pipes. I have the piece of hardware to fit the pipe through the hull which is fero-cement by the way.
Welcome to Cruiser Log Daniel!

You've brought up a topic near and dear to me as I'm in the process of putting a solid fuel stove in our boat and have done a lot of research to ensure that we can safely operate it and the installation is proper.

There are numerous folks with solid fuel stoves aboard their yachts. Some purely for heating, some for heating hot water that is circulated in radiators, and some for cooking. There are special considerations for the installation of a solid fuel stove in your boat. You're not going to be able to maintain the clearances for a home installation but there is guidance available for the installation of a solid fuel stove. The Navigator Stoveworks website happens to have a nice guide on the installation of some of their stoves--and you can get the idea just from reading their installation instructions how you might deal with a stove in your own yacht. Here is a link to that installation info for one of their stoves LINK.

In this link, you'll find reference to applicable safety standards and the following info:

American Boat & Yacht Council Inc Standard A-7, Liquid and Solid Fuel Boat Heating Systems.

National Fire Prevention Association Standard #302, Fire Protection Standard for Pleasure and Commercial Motor Craft 1998 Edition.

Regarding Stoves Aboard USCG Inspected Vessels: The 1994 US Coast Guard Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, (SNPRM, Subpart B--Cooking and Heating Sections 121.202 and 184.202 -- Restrictions.) addresses the 46 CFR 184.202 regulation prohibiting open flames:

"This new restriction is not intended to prohibit wood burning stoves, such as Ben Franklin stoves, or fireplaces with proper doors."

Most cruising yachts don't have sufficient room for clearances required by NFPA standards for residential installations--even the reduced clearances so you'll want to look to an engineered installation or get in touch with a local marine surveyor to make sure your installation is done is such a way that it will be ok when future surveys are performed (else, you won't be able to insure your vessel...)

We're installing a solid fuel stove in our galley (it originally had a combination solid fuel/propane stove there) with an accessory of Trangia-based non-pressure alcohol burners for summer/hot weather use. Our boat originally had a small solid fuel stove in the main saloon as well, but we will likely put a diesel wall-mount stove there instead.

Most all solid fuel stoves built for residential use are far too big for use in a cruising yacht. You can find a few smaller stoves (for example the Morso Squirrel is available here in the USA and some of the Jotul stoves are almost small enough) but you are likely to do better with a stove made for boat use. The Fatsco stove company has a few, as does Navigator Stove Works. The Lunenburg Foundry in Canada used to make boat stoves, but I believe their patterns were purchased by Navigator. The Washington Stoveworks (no longer made) and Shipmate stoves made by the Stamford Foundry are no longer available new, but you can find them used sometimes. The Concordia company can sell you one of their stoves, but it will be dear in cost as they're not in production and are only special order. Dickinson Marine makes a wall-mount saloon stove for solid fuel and Paul E Luke Company makes some solid fuel stoves.

Once you've decided on a stove that possibly fits the space you have (with a proper installation for the reduced clearances of the boat space available) you'll be also most interested in the chimney and thru deck fittings required. We're doing our installation now and we have a "moat" style thru deck fitting that one puts water in to keep the deck around the pipe cool. Is this the same type of piece you're talking about already having for your stove? What diameter is the thru deck fitting that you have?

We also have designed a "double pipe" installation allowing air space to keep the flue gases hot and the deck cool. The Class-A double wall stovepipe made for house installation will not typically fit your boat installation so if you choose to do a double wall installation, you'll probably have to have it custom fabricated (as we're in the process of doing right now) for your application.

How much space do you have for the stove? Where will the chimney exit the deck/cabintop?

Looking forward to further discussion.
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Old 10-27-2008, 01:01 AM   #3
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This is great information! I have a thru-hull fitting for a 6" pipe, but it does not have a moat. I like the idea of a moat though. I am not worried about the fitting I have. I might have to get a different one depending on what kind of wood stove I get. The chimney would go through the deck which is ferro-cement like the rest of the boat. Do you think I still need a moat? I do have plenty of space in the galley/saloon area. I have a 52-foot boat and its interior is rather spacious. That's another reason I was thinking about a wood stove.
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Old 10-27-2008, 01:37 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by CaptainDaniel View Post
This is great information! I have a thru-hull fitting for a 6" pipe, but it does not have a moat. I like the idea of a moat though. I am not worried about the fitting I have. I might have to get a different one depending on what kind of wood stove I get. The chimney would go through the deck which is ferro-cement like the rest of the boat. Do you think I still need a moat? I do have plenty of space in the galley/saloon area. I have a 52-foot boat and its interior is rather spacious. That's another reason I was thinking about a wood stove.
Hi, Daniel,

Is it a thru hull or thru deck fitting? They are two very different things. One designed for the hull, one for the deck. You'll be taking your stove pipe thru the deck not the hull.
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