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-   -   Boom Brakes & Preventers (https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/f46/boom-brakes-and-preventers-1525.html)

captstu 02-02-2009 09:40 PM

The Gub'Easy on the Shearwater, a '93 Gemini 3400, is installed on the very, very end of the boom - so the forces are lower while the distance traveled is greater. I plan on trying some 8mm line tomorrow and see if it performs more satisfactorily.

MMNETSEA 02-03-2009 12:02 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by captstu (Post 30141)
The Gub'Easy on the Shearwater, a '93 Gemini 3400, is installed on the very, very end of the boom - so the forces are lower while the distance traveled is greater. I plan on trying some 8mm line tomorrow and see if it performs more satisfactorily.

Hello Stuart,

If you go to a previous topic headed Boombrake: HERE, you will find a design made in stainless steel using the same criteria as is in the Gybe Easy from Wichard.

I have used the stainless brake with 14,12, 8mm line and even with 6mm braid - Successfully.

Here are a couple of pictures showing different line in different friction positions.

Attachment 790

Attachment 791

This one rigged with 6mm braid.

The only negative in using a brake on the boom-end on a catamaran is the extraordinary amount of line that is required. Whatever, the advantage of a brake compared to using a preventer from the point of safety and not having to release the preventer and retying it, should be considered for every sail boat's rigging setup.

Trim50 02-03-2009 03:30 PM

Here is how you get seriously injured even on a light air day while sailing...

https://www.break.com/index/sailor-knocked-...boom-swing.html

tel 02-04-2009 03:55 AM

Boom brakes are desirable things. I know this for two reasons (1) mine was stolen and (2) I've done ocean crossing with them and they earn their keep. However, I agree with JeanneP, I prefer to tack down-wind.

babylonlarry 02-04-2009 01:51 PM

I have boom head clearance in the cockpit. I once went forward to retrieve a loose piece of gear, was not paying attention to the main and had a glancing blow high on the forehead when the boom came across in an accidental jibe. Vowed never again to not set a preventer or not keep an eye on the boom when on a short downwind leg. I always cautiously watch the boom when I set the vang tackle to work as an outboard preventer.

Having clearance for crew in case of an uncontrolled jibe does not take into account the harmful shock to the rig when it happens in fresh conditions. I once jibed in about 25kts, while below making lunch. It pulled a forward lower chainplate and it's structural member to the hull up about an inch!

MMNETSEA 02-04-2009 08:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babylonlarry (Post 30195)
Once jibed in about 25kts, while below making lunch. It pulled a forward lower chainplate and it's structural member to the hull up about an inch!

This is an occasion where the brake comes into its own - while a preventer may prevent injury to crew - it does not limit possible damage to standing rigging - especially when the boom end - ends up in the briny.

redbopeep 02-04-2009 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babylonlarry (Post 30195)
I once went forward to retrieve a loose piece of gear, was not paying attention to the main and had a glancing blow high on the forehead when the boom came across in an accidental jibe.

I'm a total clutz on land. Put me on a boat and I'm entertaining to onlookers to watch--but well, dangerous due to my clutzyness. Unless winds are very light and we're sailing well forward of a beam reach...when I go forward and I'm adjacent to a boom on a smaller vessel (w/o preventer) I bend over the cabin trunk or even go forward "on all fours" if the boom is really low. My husband thinks its overkill, but having lived with me, he knows that I'm prone to tripping so its best for me to stay low anyway. On a larger vessel, I just force myself to bend over/hunch under the boom level while going forward which does the trick. Terribly cautious I am--but I know that I could get wacked so easily by a boom. The club-footed staysail is another danger to all on our boat. It can be rigged with a preventer in the same way as the mainsail, though.


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