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-   -   Anchor Sail (https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/f46/anchor-sail-3212.html)

Muse41 07-30-2009 05:44 PM

Thanks to all who have helped on my steep learning curve. For those with patience, here's another question. My Beneteau 331 swings a lot at its mooring. While other boats seem to point into the wind, she pretty frequently moves in about an 80 degree arc. I've seen advertisements for an anchor sail which fans out from center to both port and starboard. The premise is that when the boat starts to swing to port, the wind captured in the starboard wing will push to starboard, thus neutralizing and holding the boat on center. Sounds feasible to me, but I have two questions.

I have a topping list as well as an ajustable boom vang. It looks like the anchor sail could be raised by the topping lift. But will there be any issues of strain on the boom or mast if the topping lift is tied to the sail and not supporting the boom?

Secondly, anyone have any experience with this type of anchor sail?

Much appreciated

Buck on Nepenthe

redbopeep 07-30-2009 10:59 PM

Hi there Buck,

Are you talking about a mooring or anchorage? The reasons for swing can have to do with how you're attached to the mooring ball--this is why I ask.

Onwards, assuming anchoring or attached to a mooring anchor NOT the mooring ball, things should be the same...

Yawls and Ketches are known to leave the mizzen sail up as a riding sail to keep the boat from hunting about while at anchor. I've never seen the type of sail you're talking about. However, your topping lift holds your boom up while not underway since I don't believe your boat would have a boom gallows or boom crutch. I wouldn't want to use my topping lift for the purpose you describe.

I do not speak with authority on the subject but it would seem that the backstay would be the place that one would place a riding sail--and rig it to one side or the other of the boat. Depending on the reason your boat is sailing about on anchor, you may have other things you could do--I've heard of folks hanging a bucket or drogue from the anchor chain just below the surface of the water to achieve the same results w/o a riding sail; also you may be able to use a bridle and adjust your boat's angle to wind and waves to achieve less hunting about.

Finally, if you are at a mooring and you're attached to the ball rather than to a line that goes down to the mooring anchor/block (whatever it is secured to) then that could be part of the problem. If all the other boats are attached in the same manner, though, it would seem strange that only your boat is having problems.

Best of luck to you https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif

Muse41 08-03-2009 09:13 PM

Thanks for the information. This happens at a mooring, and after reading your response I have a hunch about what may be causing the problem. It has to do with a rig that the marina put in place. It goes from a single line to both port and starboard cleats by a line with loops on both ends attached to the single mooring line. These lines don't seem to be of equal length, and I have a hunch they are fighting each other. No one else around me has anything like this configuration.

Much appreciated!

Buck

redbopeep 08-03-2009 10:18 PM

Hi, Buck,

If you have a bridle arrangement (sounds like it) perhaps it is because of a bowsprit/bobstay and it is a safety? Well, I hope you get it all figured out shortly. Let us know how it worked out in any case.

Fair winds,

JeanneP 08-04-2009 12:20 AM

Our Jeanneau Sun Fizz also sailed at anchor. *With her almost plumb bow and generous freeboard, the entire bow section acted as a sail and the springy light nylon rode just acted like a kite string. *When we crossed into the Pacific we changed our ground tackle from short chain and all nylon rode to all chain. *The extra weight slowed the boat down and kept it more calmly lying into the wind. *

In those anchorages where we encountered a current that would push us beam-to the wind and thus start her sailing again, we would put out a stern anchor to keep her bow to the wind.

I've never seen an anchor riding sail on a sloop, but I found a picture of one -*https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/upl...3_54_19418.jpg

As you see, it's flown from the backstay with the main halyard hold it up. *I wonder if a port and starboard bridle to your anchor chain might work equally well, more easily deployed and retrieved than a backstay sail. *Cheaper, too! *I'd try other strategies first before investing so much money in an anchoring sail.

J


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