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-   -   Sail Around The World Easward Or Westward? (https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/f16/sail-around-the-world-easward-or-westward-3496.html)

Deniz 11-10-2009 11:15 AM

Goggle is not very much useful for sailors I guess, can’t find much information until I find this site, I think this site is alive, and I have a question. What is the best way sail around the world eastward or westward? in other word what is the good plan to sail around the world? Thanks for your help.

JeanneP 11-10-2009 11:44 AM

Westward is the easy way. Because the prevailing winds in the temperate and warm latitudes generally blow from east to west. If you want high latitude sailing, get far enough into the cold climes and the winds are west to east.

West to east is how the 'round the world races run. The boats survive gales and icebergs in exchange for a shorter route, and westerly winds.

The "coconut milk run" across the Pacific stopping at the various island groups along the way, is east to west. Trying to go west to east is hard work.

You can find this information in publications such as Jimmy Cornell's "World Cruising Routes", and the British Admiralty's "Ocean Passages of the World".

Deniz 11-10-2009 12:58 PM

brilliant, thank you very much. Now I know what I need to look for and I need to read a lot I guess. How about best time to start and finish then. Lets say from start from Gibraltar to the west and through Panama Canal, Australia and Suez Canal back to the Mediterranean. Thanks

bvimatelot 11-10-2009 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deniz (Post 38018)
brilliant, thank you very much. Now I know what I need to look for and I need to read a lot I guess. How about best time to start and finish then. Lets say from start from Gibraltar to the west and through Panama Canal, Australia and Suez Canal back to the Mediterranean. Thanks

Well, with the books that Jeanne has recommended, you'll find the answers or leads to them.

But: for example, you are now going to have to look at weather patterns. The Atlantic and Caribbean Hurricane Season is from June to November. So you'll want to avoid that. Then you've got to have a look at the routines for going through the Panama Canal and the associated costs (check www.noonsite.com) . Then you've got the Pacific "coconut run" but where do you want to end up? If going down to NZ you'll have to time the weather and similarly you'll have to check the Indian Ocean weather patterns which are basically monsoonal but also they have their Tropical Revolving Storm Season.

On top of this, you'll have to get to grips with Visa requirements at the various stops, for example you have to "ask" Australia (and no doubt other countries) in good time before you visit...you cannot just arrive unannounced on their doorstep.

You've probably heard of the current dangers of the approaches to the Suez Canal - so you'll want to think about that or instead go round the Cape.

Lots of work here.....have fun! Tony

Deniz 11-10-2009 02:21 PM

Yes, I know British couple held by pirates, I guess you are talking about but still would like to sea Red Sea and Suez Canal. But before that need to study hard. There is no short answer to my question I know but practically thinking best time then is to leave Gibraltar in April to avoid Atlantic and Caribbean Hurricane Season then through Panama Canal and Pacific towards Tahiti and Australia Sydney and then straight to the Red Sea hoping not held by pirates. https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif

How is plan, is it realistic with a 10 meter sail boat? what are the do's and don'ts. Thanks

Lighthouse 11-10-2009 03:19 PM

This article, although it is primarily to assist crew to find positions, will nevertheless help to give you a rough idea of the movements of cruising yachts as they sail around the world.

SEE HERE

redbopeep 11-10-2009 03:58 PM

Welcome!

Do pick up the books that J recommended, you'll find lots of answers about "when to go where" in the world--relating to weather patterns. You can also talk to other cruisers about their experiences--many are here on Cruiser Log. Look at the blogs and read thru the cruising wiki, too.

Whatever you do--please don't let people discourage your plans by boogy-man stories of pirates and heavy weather. Rather, be prepared and take appropriate actions for the situations.

10 meter--32.5 ft. There are many 30' (and smaller) boats which have made very impressive voyages. It is only in the past 20 years or so that cruising boat size has experienced a lot of "creep" to larger sizes. You do want to end up voyaging with a boat of sufficient capacity for the stores and gear you will need to complete your longest passages. On a smaller boat, you simply might find yourself planning more provisioning stops than with a larger boat. Further, you might find that you outsource repairs to your boat because you're not able to carry the tools that are required for major repairs. If you're not the sort who is inclined to rebuild your own engine, for example, it makes little difference, though https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/happy.gif

If you're someone who enjoys reading, you might pick up a lot about large-vs-small boats by reading Annie Hill's Voyaging on a Small Income. That book has quite a bit of good advice about the decisions you will be making as you prepare for extended voyaging. You may also enjoy reading a story about a young, very unprepared couple who didn't know how to sail when they started their circumnavigation--they've published their four-year circumnavigation story in a book, but you can also read about it on their blog at bumfuzzle.com They were quite honest about all the mistakes they made, the costs associated with their travels, and the realities of the cruising lifestyle.

Fair winds,

JeanneP 11-10-2009 05:38 PM

Yes, it's doable with a 10 meter sailboat, even smaller for that matter.

How long do you plan to take to circumnavigate? Certainly not 12 months. How many years, then?

For a fast-track trip, from Gibraltar, I'd say leave in November, cruise the Caribbean, arriving in Panama in March or April(very windy sail there, though). Leave Central America in May, arriving in French Polynesia in June. Sail across the Pacific, arriving in either Australia or New Zealand the end of November, beginning of December. You will have gotten halfway around the world, plus a few more miles. Then take a deep breath, wait out cyclone season, and decide how/where you want to go.

The English couple are not the first cruising couple to be attacked by pirates off the east coast of Africa. Do a search on this forum for more information on pirates, and keep apprised of what is happening before committing to the Red Sea and the Suez Canal. The Suez Canal transit is also hard work, and you should read up on that as well.

so far, this is circumnavigating in a nutshell. There's lots more to it, but now I'll leave it to your research and specific questions.

Fair winds,

Jeanne

JeanneP 11-10-2009 10:38 PM

Sometimes it takes me some time to find things. Here's a link to download, for free, world pilot charts. Very helpful for planning ocean crossings.

NGA Atlas of Pilot Charts

J

Deniz 11-11-2009 04:02 PM

You guys really great, no one can stop me now to prepare myself to conquer the world. You are very encouraging. I believe with minimum resources and with fair knowledge it is possible, but need to have a good time and voyage plan and also with a little bit luck I think this is going to work. Books you are suggesting, definitely I need to go through. There is also one thing about sea, I believe how good my plan is or how well I have prepared myself for the voyage, if sea wants to put me in trouble, then there is no way out of it, and just fight to survive. But I want to make it pleasant and easy with a good plan and following right time, being right place at the right time. Jeanne my plan is for 6months, is it a dream https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif I am not going to hang around much though. Pilot Charts are great Jeanne, thanks a lot.

redbopeep 11-11-2009 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deniz (Post 38061)
. Jeanne my plan is for 6months, is it a dream https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif I am not going to hang around much though.

Is your plan to start your trip in 6 months? Or to sail around the world in 6 months? I'll assume you'll start your trip in 6 months since the latter would be difficult to imagine doing on an average 10m cruising vessel...

You can dream of going around the world in 80 days (hey, isn't that a book? https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/happy.gif ) if you're in a big ocean racer such as those used in the Vendée Globe and using the roaring 40's to your advantage. However, take a little boat like you're talking of...one that has a 6 knot hull speed and cruises at an average of 3 or 4 knots (if you're lucky)...consider doing a great circle route (which you won't do) of 22,000 nautical miles more or less...that's between 5500 and 7300 hours of sailing time. Consider that you won't be sailing non-stop around the clock. Lets say you're aggressive with your schedule, don't wait or storms, don't break down or have supply issues...so maybe your boat is sailing 2/3 of the time...then we're talking about 340 days on the short side and 450 days on the long side doing that 3 to 4 knots...many folks only average 2 knots, btw... https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub..._DIR#>/huh.gif

The world's oceans are wonderful things...allowing we voyagers to visit far away places and enjoy cultures beyond our own. And plenty of lovely, exciting, and fun sailing along the way. I hope you'll embark on an adventure that is fulfilling.

Deniz 11-11-2009 08:08 PM

Damn, it is taking that long!

I did some calculations here. Atlantic Ocean; Gibraltar to Panama 4.500.00 Nautical Miles, Pacific Ocean; Panama to Tahiti 4.500.00 Nautical Miles, Tahiti to Sydney 3.500.00 Nautical Miles, Indian Ocean; Sydney to Red Sea 6.500.00 Nautical Miles, Red Sea to Gibraltar 3.500.00 Nautical Miles.

Total 4.500.00+ 4.500.00+3.500.00+6.500.00+3.500.00=25.500.00 Nautical Miles.

If I can keep up 6 knot speed per hour and nonstop 24hour sailing 3 people. I can back to Gibraltar in 6 months https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif calculated.

6 knot per hour times 24 hours equal 144 nautical Miles a day. 25.500.00 Nautical Miles divided by 144 knots equal 177 Days total, under 6 months. https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif

Of course everything has to be going right, and it might actually not realistic, there is no way to keep 6 knot speed as you said and 24 hours sailing is also not possible. But I am pretty sure that is manageable in a year to circumnavigate.

redbopeep 11-11-2009 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deniz (Post 38066)
Damn, it is taking that long!

If I can keep up 6 knot speed per hour and nonstop 24hour sailing 3 people. I can back to Gibraltar in 6 months https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif calculated.

6 knot per hour times 24 hours equal 144 nautical Miles a day. 25.500.00 Nautical Miles divided by 144 knots equal 177 Days total, under 6 months. https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/smile.gif

Of course everything has to be going right, and it might actually not realistic, there is no way to keep 6 knot speed as you said and 24 hours sailing is also not possible. But I am pretty sure that is manageable in a year to circumnavigate.

Everyone has their dream--this being your dream I wish you the best of luck in doing it. Having said that, if you really only have a year to work with, you might have a far better time choosing a year of voyaging a different circuit rather than doing a circumnavigation that you won't see anything during. Neither my husband nor I have it as a goal to do a circumnavigation--rather our goal is to visit certain places and live in certain places on the boat. I do imagine that we may well end up accidentally circumnavigating as I know many folks have done just that--by accident https://www.cruiserlog.com/forums/pub...IR#>/happy.gif

If you seriously only have a year to do it in, you may be best off to invest in a much larger vessel which will allow you higher average cruising speed and you might have a better chance of achieving your goal and having a good time while doing it.

P.S. ask some owners of small boats of the size you're considering what their daily average is for passage making. See how many manage more than 80 to 100 mile days in succession. It is surprising how slow things do go.

Fair winds,

twomt 11-12-2009 02:37 AM

of course you are betting on nothing at all ever going wrong. while you try and rack up the miles. you might think of taking three months and going half way. its not like there is nothing to see in the med and Atlantic. heck you might enjoy the Bahamas or Cuba enough to tarry for a month or so.

As probably one of the very very very few people these days that has spent 6 solid months at sea; you might want to reconsider your plan cause its not an easy thing to do. you can even find yourself getting on your own nerves.

any ways if your set on it dont let anyone stop you; have fun and take it one day at a time.

Nausikaa 11-12-2009 05:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deniz (Post 38066)
But I am pretty sure that is manageable in a year to circumnavigate.

Why would you want to do that? Surely the point of sailing around the world is to see something and not just to have a very uncomfortable time at sea? If that is all you want then just head our into the Atlantic, cross to the Caribbean and then head northwards until you reach Bermuda and then turn eastwards back to Europe. In general, you will have following winds, be quite uncomfortable some of the time and see a lot of water - which is pretty much what you would do if you tried to sail round the world at 6 knots within a year.

Aye // Stephen

Marcin2000 08-09-2018 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redbopeep (Post 21750)
..... You may also enjoy reading a story about a young, very unprepared couple who didn't know how to sail when they started their circumnavigation,




Hey. Im 22y old and I want to sail across the globe but first I must get my boat licence (driving license). I done this one year ago and now I save money and look for some sponsors to buy a ship etc. How this couple start sailing without "driving licence" for boat. U must know the maritime law. When u must wait and when u can go etc. Without licence they can have big problem with the coast guard police.

haiqu 08-10-2018 04:56 PM

Driving licence relates to power boats. Sailing isn't power boat unless you have an engine on board.

But you need to know much more than that!

Auzzee 08-11-2018 01:23 AM

Experience is the key and some people, like me, gained all their experience without the benefit of any formal training. Sailing with friends, racing around the buoys, listening to seasoned sailors and common sense are great tutors.

Licensing is not necessarily common...but even where it is common, the granting of a license is the starting point, not the conclusion.

Marcin2000 08-11-2018 09:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by haiqu (Post 46522)
Driving licence relates to power boats. Sailing isn't power boat unless you have an engine on board.

But you need to know much more than that!


In the Netherlands u need license if you boat is longer then 15meter (49feet) of if the boat speed is higher then 20kmh (10knots)



U can buy boat which u can sail without license and learn how to sail but if u wanna go threw panama canal u need to borrow a outside motor and with small boat and motor with 5hp u can easy go faster then 20kmh. Different countries different laws.

Auzzee 08-11-2018 01:23 PM

Hi Marcin. The Dutch make great boats. I know...I own one made by the venerable Franz Maas in 1963. A lot of the licensing rules in the Netherlands are there because you have the world's busiest port which wouldn't function half as well if all the boaters were unaware of the rules.


In Australia it is easier (particularly where I am from in the Northern Territory) because we have a country the size of America with just the population of greater New York.

Sailing is in your genes (after all 'Yacht' is a Dutch word) and I hope you get to live your dream. Join your nearest sailing club and commence the learning. It will repay you with a lifetime of pleasure.
Best wishes and keep us informed and welcome to Cruiser Log


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