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Old 04-16-2015, 12:30 PM   #29
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Hi haiqu
thanks for the link on wooden mast. I had wood mast till two years ago but got tired of all the work to keep them looking good. the alu, mast I awl griped with 4 diffrent colors to make them look like wood. This was a lot of work as it is takes 6 diffrrent steps. You can't not tell thay are alu, now.
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Old 04-17-2015, 01:47 AM   #30
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Ah. That was for technophobe56 who doesn't have a mast as yet.
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Old 04-17-2015, 02:01 AM   #31
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Hi Haiqu,
I do actually have a mast, but the guy I got the boat from only ever bought the boat for the mast, to put on another boat he is doing up. Eventually, the mast will come off. The thing is, I am nearly 60, have never sailed, wouldn't even know where to start, and my cruising is confined to the river here so sailing is not really an option, so I guess what I really have is a Hartley RORC 39 motor boat

I saying that, I did get her at a severely discounted price.

I was looking for a motor boat, certainly not looking at ferro, but this came up, learning about ferro and repairs, and I couldn't be happier.
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:05 PM   #32
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Hi Technophobe, Using the ferro yacht as a motorboat is a fine idea. However, I would advise you to keep the mast, even if you never bend on a sail. The underwater profile of a ballasted sailing boat is totally different from that of a motorboat. One of the things which allows this to happen is ascribed to the pendulum effect. On a pendulum, you will see that the shorter it is, (or the position of the moveable weight along the shaft of the pendulum), the faster the pendulum will oscillate. Imagine taking the pendulum off a clock. The oscillation is so fast the clock will race. In short, the pendulum adds a degree of moment. It is the same on a sail boat. If you remove the mast (the arm of the pendulum) the hull oscillates faster. It will roll on its beam ends in any sort of a swell or slop and you will get mighty sick of the movement mighty quickly. Keep the mast in place and the boat will sit comfortably in the water. You can move the boom (but that's a very nice place to hang a sun awning), but keep the cap shrouds, inner stays, fore and aft stays and that way you can keep the stick in the air and nobody spends the day spewing.
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Old 04-18-2015, 01:06 AM   #33
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Technophobe, I'm 62 and have only been on one trip so far, from Newcastle to Christchurch, NZ. It's never too late to learn and you might actually enjoy sailing ... especially when you realize how costly diesel can be for longer trips!

I'd suggest keeping an eye open for someone looking for delivery crew up the coast and jumping in with an offer of help. Good way to make friends as well.

The RORC 39 is a fine sailing boat, far better than either of mine when in running condition and certainly too good to be used as a river barge.
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Old 08-14-2015, 02:02 AM   #34
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Hi all. Just wondering why with all the toughness of a well build Ferro boat it is hard to find examples of Ferro Catamarans.


I an thinking of building a Cat and pondering the use of Ferro.


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Old 08-16-2015, 07:50 PM   #35
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Ferro is a good material, but is not necessarily suitable for smaller, or lightweight, boats. I guess it depends upon the size you are contemplating. The other concern about ferro for a non ballasted boat is that once holed, a catamaran will generally float as long as it is constructed of a material which has a lower specific density than the water in which, it is hoped, it will remain afloat.. Ferro doesn't fit the bill here.
Finally, the reason why ferro has gone out of favour is not because it is unsuitable; rather, the cost of materials (cement and steel for the armature) has become very expensive. For a home built these days, therefore, most are using marine ply and epoxy.
Hope this was of some help.
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Old 08-16-2015, 10:37 PM   #36
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Good point about specific density Auzzie. I guess the issue of being holed is a growing concern with the number of other craft and floating objects on the water, not to mention my own ability to bump into fixed objects.


My thinking is moving toward the refit of a live a board monohull in order to get out on the water as fast as possible and play mind games with the Cat idea while puddling around the pacific islands.
Which leads me into the mind bend of which hull material I feel more inclined to spend a year laboring over Wood or Ferro. It really comes down to weighing up pro's and con's then running with the material I most want the romance of living with.


No doubt a bigger budget and more red wine will be required to come to an answer.


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Old 08-17-2015, 04:16 AM   #37
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Red wine makes a fine catalyst.
Take a look at James Wharram's designs for catamarans. Easy home builds and good seaworthy boats for not a lot of money.
Good cheap boats to fix-up are generally either one or the other....good, or cheap; this is where ferro comes into its own. There is such a thing as a good cheap ferro boat and they can be found as long as you have a knowledgeable ferro bloke helping you look.
Good luck.
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Old 08-17-2015, 04:43 AM   #38
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Default Wharram

The Wharram's are a neat option for sure. I have mate who just had a Tiki 38' built in Thailand. Beautiful boat.

At he moment I am swinging toward getting set up in a mono hull asap and getting back out on the water. It becomes a matter of do you spend your time on shore getting ready or do you compromise and be on the water planning the next move.

I read the thread about cruising budgets and thought it is probably to do it safely, but with out all the mod cons. Than wait until everything is just right only to find the boats more sea worthy than my body is.

I am wondering is there any information around detailing what normally sinks cruising yachts or injures sailors.

I am thinking weather or at least not being prepared for it would be a biggy, but what are the other common causes?

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Old 08-17-2015, 04:49 AM   #39
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Thumbs up essential skills

Is it a case of an old boat in the hands of a well prepared sailor is safer than a technological dream boat in the hands of an idiot?

This also begs the question how does one prepare for cruising.
I know there was some discussion about the essential equipment to carry, but what are the essential skills required for cruising.
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Old 08-26-2015, 01:29 AM   #40
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I think it would depend a lot on what kind of cruising you intend to do, zeb. The term covers anything from gunkholing up the coast to crossing oceans. If you're going solo then I'd certainly do the former before attempting the latter.

Primary skills - apart from the usual 'bloke skills' like knowing how to use tools - would include navigation, weather interpretation, patience, self-sufficiency and being organized. I know a lot of tradesmen who have great manual skills that I wouldn't let near a boat because they leave crap all over the kitchen at home, expecting the wife to clean up after them. You can't live like that in confined spaces. If you could comfortably live out of the back of a small van then you should be OK on a yacht.

As to what sinks yachts, the usual is getting into weather that the boat isn't capable of handling. Colliding with a submerged object would probably be in second place. So as long as you keep well away from coasts (and therefore hidden reefs and rocks) and keep an ear on the maritime weather reports there's very little risk of it. One other obvious danger zone is arriving at an entrance bar late in the day and being just a bit too tired and attempting to get in so you can anchor up and rest. Better off waiting until the next morning unless you're fully alert.
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Old 08-26-2015, 11:02 AM   #41
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If you are thinking of a monohull for the Pacific islands, it may be worth considering a steel hull. These are cheap to repair and will take plenty of knocks etc. The charts for areas of the Pacific are not as accurate as your navigation systems which is how boats end up on reefs etc.
As Auzzee said, a plywood Wharram is a good choice. Ideal once again for the Pacific.
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