Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > General Cruising Forum
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-23-2008, 05:58 PM   #1
Retired Mod
 
Lighthouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Home Port: Durban
Posts: 2,984
Default

"Man Overboard" is probably one of the most dreaded occurances (along with a fire aboard) that sailors can experience.

Are we cruisers well enough prepared and practiced to handle the disaster of MOB? Do we put enough into preparing for this and do we have the right equipment aboard should a MOB event occur?

Anyone have an experience to share?



See the relevant page on the Cruising Wiki and PLEASE edit/add to the information there.
__________________

__________________


The World Cruising & Sailing Wiki

Help to build this free, online World Cruising Guide.

"Built by cruisers, for cruisers''

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: Most sections
Lighthouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-23-2008, 06:35 PM   #2
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post
"Man Overboard" is probably one of the most dreaded occurances (along with a fire aboard) that sailors can experience.

Are we cruisers well enough prepared and practiced to handle the disaster of MOB? Do we put enough into preparing for this and do we have the right equipment aboard should a MOB event occur?

Anyone have an experience to share?



See the relevant page on the Cruising Wiki and PLEASE edit/add to the information there.
Not a MOB but a HOB (hat overboard) but still relevant:

Two weeks ago while enjoying a nice sail with friends on their boat we had an "incident" where Hubby was wearing my favorite hat and "zip" the wind grabbed it and it went overboard. We happened to be hove to at the moment about 15 miles offshore in SoCal--all four of us kicking back eating lunch and drinking beer and enjoying the day. We decided to do a MOB drill since, well, it was a favorite hat! When the hat went overboard, like a pointing retriever, I immediately "self designated" as the "keep the MOB in sight" person. The couple we were with had not done a MOB drill before so hubby took the helm and proceeded to the Figure 8--his and my "standard" for MOB drills. Well, we learned that when hove to w/o much speed the Figure 8 takes a long time!

My drab green hat got further and further away, bobbing up and down sometimes visible in the swell, sometimes not. I wished that I'd tossed the MOB stick in as I worried about losing sight. But the stick was so far up the backstay that I worried I'd become a MOB if I tried to get it!

I felt like Tom Hanks character in Castaway as he watched Wilson (the soccer ball) bobbing away from him without the ability to do anything about it. We were finally on the way back to the HOB when I could no longer see it. The couple on board hadn't been tracking the hat, they were watching Hubby go through the maneuver of getting back to the hat. I continued to point to where I "thought" the hat should be--where I'd last seen it. As, about a minute later, we finally passed that point to starboard of the boat, my heart sunk, no hat. It was lost. Suddenly, two boat lengths later, the guy who owns the boat pointed at the HOB in the water on the port side of the boat! Hubby did a quick Jibe maneuver and the boat owner tried to get the HOB with a fishing pole/hook. He missed but we ran over the HOB! Ouch! Back with a QuickStop maneuver, this time the HOB on the starboard side of the boat--the boat's owner nabbed the hat with the fishing pole and all was well and good.

Not a MOB but a good MOB drill--and we saved my favorite hat. Lessons learned:

It was really nice having a set of eyes on the MOB/HOB and having extra people to "pick up" the MOB. In the past while practicing MOB on our boat, Hubby or I would pretend to be the MOB and the other person had to do everything on their own--launch the stick, do the maneuvering and recover the stick (which we treated as our MO.

Have the MOB marker where you can actually access it! It was too high up the backstay to really use.

Don't run over the MOB! If it had been a person, not a hat, that would have been very risky!

From this drill, we noted that a couple things happened that ALWAYS happen to hubby or I when doing MOB drills--

We had to do "multiple" maneuvers to get to the MOB/HOB as we typically pass the target w/o being able to pick it up on the first go;

Similarly, we typically end up running over our MOB target/stick in order to be close enough to pick it up;

Things bob away from the boat faster than you can say "hey--that fell overboard" so one must act quickly.

__________________

__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2008, 01:55 PM   #3
Ensign
 
Auspicious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 37
Default

The good news is that people are easier than hats. They don't drift nearly so fast.

A sobering case study on MOBs that I re-read periodically: http://www.ussailing.org/safety/Studies/li...ing_history.htm

Always better to learn from the actions of others than ourselves. That said, kudos to redbopeep for doing MOB drills. Not many people do.

sail fast, dave
__________________
sail fast, dave

S/V Auspicious
Auspicious is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2008, 01:07 AM   #4
Admiral
 
MMNETSEA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,067
Default

Thanks Red,

Just to add - As most cruising boats have GPSs with MOB function as standard - if/when the opportunity allows during the rescue/search --- HIT the Mob button.

Richard
__________________
MMNETSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2008, 01:52 AM   #5
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MMNETSEA View Post
Thanks Red,

Just to add - As most cruising boats have GPSs with MOB function as standard - if/when the opportunity allows during the rescue/search --- HIT the Mob button.

Richard
That's a great idea if one has a GPS with that function--we don't at this time. We have two (one old Raytheon that spits out lat/long info at you...and one little "mouse" sized USB GPS for the computer chart software); though we will eventually buy a new one but that's really low on the list compared to other things safety and navigation related.
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2008, 02:36 AM   #6
Admiral
 
MMNETSEA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 3,067
Default

Here's Garmin's answer to a FAQ : - MOB ?
__________________
MMNETSEA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2008, 06:35 PM   #7
Rear Admiral
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 396
Default

The chart software should have a MOB function.

While sailing a lonely S.F Bay during the middle of the week. My ex was steering, and we were enjoying a 15 knot wind. There was a splash, and my wife with saucer eyes looked at me, and asked WHAT WAS THAT? Pole over board I said to her. I soon realized that I better never fall overboad. 30 minutes later I sailed the boat up alongside the MOB pole, and retrieved it. My harness soon became my best friend when ever sailing alone, or with people. That day was a serious lesson to me. NOBODY WILL BE ABLE TO COMEBACK FOR ME!
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2008, 03:38 AM   #8
Moderator
 
redbopeep's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Home Port: Washington DC
Vessel Name: SV Mahdee
Posts: 3,185
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
The chart software should have a MOB function.
Probably does. I know I could quickly set a waypoint at a minimum.

Regarding your 30 minute retrieval-- have you and your spouse done MOB drills since then?
__________________
"Do or do not. There is no try." - Yoda

What we're doing - The sailing life aboard and the Schooner Chandlery.

redbopeep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 01:54 AM   #9
Moderator
 
delatbabel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 687
Send a message via AIM to delatbabel
Default

I have had HOB incidents on Sydney Harbour as well as one offshore.

These days I have one simple rule: Every HOB incident is treated EXACTLY like a MOB incident. It means that you and your crew get some practice in the MOB drill and procedure. MOB indicents don't happen when you are planning them -- like "hey, we have a few km of nice clear flat water here, let's practice our MOB drill", they only happen in difficult conditions when you're not expecting them.

I also take pains to point out to the crew that in EVERY MOB incident surveyed to date, 100% of the people who did not go overboard survived the incident. The simple rule is to keep those harnesses on and lanyards attached when up on watch, and don't unclip to go pee over the transom. I always have spare lanyards on board so if you need to take a second to go maneuver around some obstacle on foredeck, go take one. Better to have the second lanyard get in your way than to get hit by a big wave while you're unclipping/reclipping your only lanyard and end up in the drink.
__________________
= New South Wales, Queensland,
delatbabel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 06:13 AM   #10
Commander
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Home Port: Stockton, MO
Vessel Name: Ceilidh
Posts: 160
Default

I have a friend by the name of Wendy Ousley who was swept overboard by an rogue wave in the Caribbean AT NIGHT! She was crewing on a 54' Hylas and was in the company of friends and good sailors, yet this happened. Just as she came up the companionway and before she clipped her harness in a side curtain started to blow (or something of the sort-I wasn't there). She, being committed crew leapt to fix the side curtain just as the wave hit. A sailing companion (who I moor about 300 yards from) watched her go overboard and sounded the alarm. Now both you and I know that finding a person in calm seas in daylight can be difficult... She was in confused seas at night. We all can thank God that she is still with us, but MOB drills and a seasoned crew helps also! My friend can remember "every" little detail, but the two things that really stick out when the story is told is the attitude that they approached the rescue with; "She WILL be found!", and the feeling my friends all experienced when she was safely aboard again: They just couldn't let her go! Wendy went though a varied emotional roller-coaster that night. She never gave up, but she at times started to lose hope. She knew the odds were against her. Her latest tattoo reads "Hold Fast" and give the lat/lon of the incident. No one could tell for sure just how long her rescue took because of the excitement of the moment, but I can tell you that this is one tough gal, and a very special crew that found her under these conditions. Her story was in Latitudes & Attitudes and it was Jake (Yellow Shoes) Hylas that she was on. These are the folks that hang out at my land-locked fresh-water lake in the middle of the USA. Now: Everybody go practice your MOB Drills. I got mine on the first pass last time! Oops, that was two months ago!

David

S/V Friendship

P.S. Here is a picture of myself, my wife Brenda, Wendy's Husband Doug, and Wendy L-R

m_MarinaBackground.jpg
__________________
Wildernesstech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 06:38 PM   #11
Commander
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Home Port: Stockton, MO
Vessel Name: Ceilidh
Posts: 160
Default

I found where the article is online: Search for Latitudes & Attitudes Magazine, the issue to download is #89, and the story is on page 62. I think that it is a free download.

David
__________________
Wildernesstech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2008, 06:40 PM   #12
Rear Admiral
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 396
Default

Rebopeep,

That was in 92, and a couple of years later she was my ex. Although through divorce we did learn to become friends, and still exchange mail to this day.

My current wife drives the boat all the time. She doesn't know how to sail yet, but she does know how to douse the main, furl the sails, push the MOB BUTTON, and the first thing is to drop the strobe, and ring off the back of the boat. My harness is still my friend when leaving the cockpit. I still act as if I am sailing alone. I have been thrown from my previous boat before while single-handing Baja, and my harness saved my life.
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 08:30 PM   #13
Retired Mod
 
Lighthouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Home Port: Durban
Posts: 2,984
Default

Any more experiences to relate?
__________________


The World Cruising & Sailing Wiki

Help to build this free, online World Cruising Guide.

"Built by cruisers, for cruisers''

I've Contributed to the Cruisers Wiki: Most sections
Lighthouse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 10:08 PM   #14
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

Not our experience, but interesting.

Friends were sailing out to Cocos Island to meet us. They had a small Venezuelan parrot aboard, named Blue. Blue was a pretty dumb parrot, not very good at flying though very good at taking their radar apart. As they were sailing, about 250 miles from anything, Blue decided to take a little flight around the boat. Since he wasn't a very good flyer, he got about 100 feet from the boat and belly-flopped into the water.

Gary yelled, Oh, no, Blue! and jumped into the water to save the silly bird. Ingrid, left alone on the boat, did a lovely jibe and dropped the main, toddled over to Gary carrying Blue, and retrieved them both. They thought that was a perfectly sensible MOB drill.

Blue had more lives than a cat. That was not the first, nor the last, time he flew off the boat only to drop like a stone into the water. And off Gary would go to save him.
__________________

__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Man Dies After Boat Sinks Off Plymouth MMNETSEA Overdue & Distress Reports 0 05-13-2010 07:57 AM
Man Overbaord Tracking Device Survey patchoe Power & Electronics 3 08-30-2009 09:42 AM
Man Overboard! :-))) argonaut1jay The Tavern | Welcome Aboard 1 07-09-2009 04:18 PM
8 Man Liferaft Lew on Harmony Cruiser's Market 0 07-13-2007 04:42 PM
Get this man a fishing pole... Trim50 General Cruising Forum 3 01-10-2007 06:57 AM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0