Go Back   Cruiser Log World Cruising & Sailing Forums > Cruising Forums > General Cruising Forum
Cruiser Wiki

Join Cruiser Log Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-26-2008, 07:53 PM   #1
Admiral
 
Trim50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Home Port: Who cares really...
Vessel Name: T
Posts: 1,215
Send a message via Yahoo to Trim50
Default

After reading Billabong’s latest log entry I was forced to think about the “perspective” of cruising. KT describes their new friends aboard a 27 foot boat following behind them and seemingly enjoying the crossing from a completely different perspective than they were aboard their fully equipped “yacht”. http://svbillabong.blogspot.com/

Without refrigeration or many modern conveniences, the true sailor takes pleasure in the experience of simple existence…wind, full sails, water passing by the hull and fish drying in the sun.

Several weeks ago we discussed Paul’s situation aboard Blue Stocking

http://www.sailblogs.com/member/bluestocking/

in which he had come upon hard financial times while underway. JeanneP then pointed out that she encountered many people while cruising that had far far less and yet they didn’t even seem to think that their situation was anything but paradise purely as a result of perspective.

As I sit here on my boat with digital HD on my 37inch plasma, I’m wondering if I really need such a thing while cruising? Will I enjoy my trip any more than if I didn’t have the hassle of having to keep my batteries pumped full of electrons just to view a few hours of the life I’m really trying to leave behind by going cruising in the first place? I wonder if I’ve lost sight of the goal…the reason that I want to go cruising in the first place? Do I really need 350Watts of solar…3.5kW AC, watermaker, satellite tv?

Would I be better off just saving my pennies and learning to enjoy fishing more?
__________________

__________________
[
Trim50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 08:45 PM   #2
Admiral
 
Nausikaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Default

From the blog you referred to Trim50, " I watched their little 27 foot (yes, two-seven FEET) boat roll from side to side".

Now, NAUSIKAA is feeling a bit put out and much peeved as well as worrying in case she is out of favour 'cos she is 27 feet l.o.a. Now, I know you did not want to hurt her feelings but she is getting worried in case I want to swap her for a newer and bigger model. After all, she tells me that I did that with my ex-wife and I must admit that she has a point there. Ooops no, perhaps not a bigger model concerning the wife.

I know you mean well with your post but now I worry how to calm NAUSIKAA down and convince her that in my eyes she really is a beauty and that I am not on the market for any other? I know that this is going to cost me. She has been hankering after one of those fancy SeaMe active radar reflectors for some time now so maybe I will have to bite the sour apple and get her one to keep her happy. Perhaps I should get her one of those Taylor's heaters that DON'T require electrickery to work too? She would like that. Yep, that's the answer. It's the Ghent boat show in two weeks time so I had better get along and get her something there too.

You know Trim50, you are gonna cost me a lotta cash! The least you could do is give me an interest free loan to buy the stuff and never, NEVER, EVER again mention that 37 inch plasma when NAUSIKAA is listening. But you can come fishing with us. She'd like that.

Aye // Stephen
__________________

__________________
Yacht NAUSIKAA | Call Sign: 2AJH2




WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME?

www.nausikaa.org.uk

= Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania
Nausikaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2008, 09:49 PM   #3
Admiral
 
Trim50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Home Port: Who cares really...
Vessel Name: T
Posts: 1,215
Send a message via Yahoo to Trim50
Default

Oh Stephen, we know Nausikaa has nothing to be concerned about! In fact, she is likely the essence of a "true" sailor.
__________________
[
Trim50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 01:03 AM   #4
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

"but that doesn't mean there is an inkling of joy"

I felt something like a stab in the heart when I read that. "Oh, dear, how very sad that makes me" is what I thought. I can't imagine spending days or weeks on a passage feeling like that. I really hope that she is getting some pleasure from this, they've been doing it for four years now. I can't think of anything I've ever done that I could say there wasn't even an inkling of joy. I hope it is hyperbole.

Perspective, indeed.

Nausikaa shouldn't worry, I have no doubt that she's the apple of your eye. But sure, you ought to buy her a little trinket or two. Girls like a little bling-bling occasionally.

__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 01:13 AM   #5
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,727
Default

I really wonder if it is truly a matter of perspective or practical usage. I think life in a marina needs the stimulii provided by modern conveniences. I could not do without airconditioning, the teev, ice cream in the freezer etc. I am finding that I spend as much time 'indoors' when living onboard in the marina, as I did when I was living in my house.

When I am anchored, or under sail, the TV is rarely turned on (nor is the stereo) and even here in the extreme tropics, there is seldom a time when there is insufficient wind to keep the boat into the wind at anchor, that I find the need to fire up the genny and the aircon. I tend to live 'outdoors' when at anchor and to drift fully away from the suburban lifestyle offerred by marina life.

I think voyaging in a modern,well equipped apartment is somewhat anachronistic...There is no doubt the technological developments which have transformed facilities aboard cruising yachts have brought many more people into the cruising fold...equally these developments mean more cruisers spend more time in marinas to keep their systems updated and maintained. Indeed, I know of one cruising couple who boast they have virtually never used their dinghy in several years of international cruising.

So if there is truly a difference in persepctive, it may well be a choice between the traditional quest for adventure, and the desire to merely transplant a comfortable life from land, to a clone of that lifestyle afloat, albeit with a degree of portability. I think in such a deal there is bound to be a high rate of failure.

This is of course all from a personal viewpoint. My boat is large, comfortable and has some pleasant modcons which are necessary in a marina. But at sea, I have a traditional boat with the addition of engine driven refrigeration, hot water via heat exchange and a few modern nav goodies. The bottom line is that I can continue to sail and live in comfort even if the engine dies and the sun doesn't come out.

I guess the land based equivalent is the camper who spends thousands on a three bedroom, two bathrom tent, hot water system, lounge suite, inflatable bedroom ensembles etc. etc. etc. Sure it's still camping....but.......!!

I find also I use the computer less on the boat than when I am on land. Rather than surfing the 'net, I find joy in my textbooks of ropework (fancy splicing/knots etc) and find more time to practice at becoming a slightly less crappy musician....and I feel there is joy in the latter, at least, for my future moored neighbours.

David
__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 07:05 AM   #6
Admiral
 
Nausikaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Default

NAUSIKAA is feeling a little less miffed today although she says that you guys are just saying those nice things to make her feel better, which is also going to cost me! I just can't win. I will do as Jeanne's says and get her some trinkets, although she does not take easily to trinkets either, preferring a few quality items to lots of gizmos which look good in the ship's swindlers but really have no place in a cruising boat.

I spent a long time telling her that I chose her because at 27' she is manageable by me alone (although I am having my doubts after this debacle). She need no one else to look after her, at sea or in port, although we always welcome an extra pair of hands. With one or two there is sufficient space. She says that we don't need a shore-side way of life because people, especially ashore but even at sea too, surround themselves with every possible convenience known to mankind and then don't use half of them.

As an example, I remember when my wife wanted a juice centrifuge. "Is it necessary?" said I questioningly. "Of course" was the reply followed by a long conversation amounting to don't question my judgement- just pay up. I paid up and about three years later asked why the "juicer" was never used after its maiden voyage? "Because oranges are too expensive" was the answer. Like most people we needed a big place to live just to hold the unnecessary, unneeded and frequently unused gizmos we had bought in our quest to make other people rich.

So, the gist of my conversations with NAUSIKAA was that she need not worry. I have no intention of first buying all the widgits, gizmos and whatsits, thereafter realising how useless they were and getting rid of them only to make the same mistake again. Thus NAUSIKAA is safe. I don't need a bigger boat even if there is a Midget 31 who has been flirting with me.

Without all the attributes of modern life, I find I have more time to listen to music, read books and spend "quality time" with myself as well as my boys. A few examples of what I mean:

* I sold my last car in 2006. I now walk to work. It takes 40 mins to get there and 40 to get back. As a result I am in better shape than I have been for a long time and it saves me time as I don't spend 15 mins in traffic jams, need to service, clean and otherwise take care of a car nor do I need to put in half a working day each week to pay for it.

* Upon my return from South Africa I gave my TV to a friend in Cape Town as it would not work with the system we use here. I have not bought another since then and find I am less stressed. I don't "have to get home to see this weeks episode of Coronation Street / The Flying Doctors / Zevende Laan / Peyton Place or whatever the poison is in your place. I find also that I have more time to do the things I want to do instead of lying on the sofa staring at the TV.

* I didn't buy a new dishwasher upon my return either. It is not really necessary.

By cutting out a lot of the "necessities" of modern living I am getting fitter and enjoying life more but it is a process of maturity. It applies both ashore and at sea. I am also helping in the fight against global warming in the process as well as leaving cash over for other, more important things. Last, but far from least, it means NAUSIKAA and I can spend more time sailing than fixing all the "systems" which have gone wrong.

Lin and Larry Pardey's website contains a great description of issues with systems going wrong HERE

Aye // Stephen
__________________
Yacht NAUSIKAA | Call Sign: 2AJH2




WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME?

www.nausikaa.org.uk

= Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania
Nausikaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 07:19 AM   #7
Admiral
 
Auzzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Home Port: Darwin
Vessel Name: Sandettie
Posts: 1,727
Default

Ahh...the Juicer!

High up on the list of man's most useless contrivances. But if you really want to see a waste of $ in the kitchen try the breadmaker. It is an ideal implement if you want to spend 2 hours waiting, while you make a very expensive, small, substandard loaf.

I don't think anyone ever bought a breadmaker for their own homes......why, I wonder, are they considered such good presents?

As for good trinkets for Nausikaa........I recommend a hand cranked LED torch, an expensive double skinned, stainless steel vacuum flask, a nice porthole mirror (gives you someone to talk to on a long trip) and a bottle of Bundaberg rum (makes that conversation just that bit more satisfying).

Cheers

David.
__________________
"if at first you don't succeed....Redefine success"!


Auzzee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 08:47 AM   #8
Admiral
 
Nausikaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Auzzee View Post
As for good trinkets for Nausikaa........I recommend
* a hand cranked LED torch........... Good idea!

* an expensive double skinned, stainless steel vacuum flask................. got it already

* a nice porthole mirror (gives you someone to talk to on a long trip).............nah, I might start answering back and that would be worrying

* and a bottle of Bundaberg rum (makes that conversation just that bit more satisfying).............. a bottle of rum and I could have any conversation without the aid of a mirror- Just popping out to get one

Thanks for the good advice David
__________________
Yacht NAUSIKAA | Call Sign: 2AJH2




WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME?

www.nausikaa.org.uk

= Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania
Nausikaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 05:02 PM   #9
Moderator
 
JeanneP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,098
Default

Quote:
hand cranked LED torch
When we set off on our adventure 22 years ago, we carried a torch that needed no batteries - one squeezed the handle to power the magneto (?) that generated the electricity to operate the torch. It was kept in our ditch bag, though it was dug out several times while we were at anchor.

When we bought MV Watermelon it came with a torch that again needed no batteries, its light was now an LED, and one shook it to charge it. It's called Night Star, and the picture below is of the larger one.



And now I have a new, crank charged LED torch.



Fortunately I give away my stuff as I acquire new stuff, or our boat would sink! But look at the selection of "stuff" we can get nowadays. Flashlights of all shapes and sizes are my bling-bling.

http://www.nobatteryledlight.com/?gclid=CN...CFQUalgodmF-cOQ
__________________
In 1986 we went cruising for a few years. After 20 years and 50+ countries and several oceans, we are STILL "cruising for a few years".

SY WATERMELON |
MV WATERMELON (New) | Cruiser's Dictionary, free ebook

= Cruiser's Dictionary, North America,
JeanneP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2008, 02:16 PM   #10
Rear Admiral
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 396
Default

David....

How funny with the breadmaker. My wife insisted on one after we moved ashore a couple of years ago. She promised breads galore, and what I got was one SMALL BRICK, and never another attempt. She just sold it 2 days ago for one fourth it's purchase price. Some how I refused saying I TOLD YOU SOOOOOOO!!!!!!

Trim,

I believe also that once you leave the dock many things will change. There will be so much to do, and so much to see that the TV will get very little use. I have a small flat screen, but when we travel via sail it never gets any use. The lifestyle in a marina is one thing. The lifestyle cruising is quite another. Don't feel guilty for the TV, or anything else. I am sure soon after you leave your life will soon slip into a simplier lifestyle.............
__________________
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2008, 03:00 PM   #11
Admiral
 
Trim50's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Home Port: Who cares really...
Vessel Name: T
Posts: 1,215
Send a message via Yahoo to Trim50
Default

I'm kinda hoping that is the case. I bought the 37 inch for Lori so she wouldn't go into shock after having a 50 inch to watch her football on. I then called the manufacturer to determine how many watts the thing draws. It took RCA 4 weeks to get back to me on that question which simply blew me away. Anyhow, it draws 170 Watts!...that is just stupid while cruising.
__________________
[
Trim50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2008, 09:54 PM   #12
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 58
Default

I got given a bread maker as a present. I use it fairly regularly (maybe 2 or 3 times per week). After a little bit of experimentation with the proportions, it produces good quality product every time and costs about 50% of the cost of a store bought loaf. I like the fact that I can set it to finish baking at 6:15 (when I get up), so I awake to the smell of fresh bread. Would I have one on a boat? Never! But at home it certainly pays it's way.
__________________
You what?
Weyalan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2008, 10:55 AM   #13
Ensign
 
cliftondykes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 6
Default

I have a breadmaker - it's MY HANDS

I've been making my own bread for at least 5 years now - it's about 10 minutes of effort and the rest is done by the yeast while you're doing something else. When we were cruising in the Caribbean it was especially easy to prove the bread as it just sat on the transom for 20 minutes (when at anchor ).

Breadmakers are another one of those useless western inventions that are supposed to make our lives easier but actually end up doing quite the reverse.

OK; I concede that if I want the smell of fresh bread at 6.15 I'd have to get up at 5.00 to make it (or live over a bakery) but then you can't have everything

Cliff
__________________
cliftondykes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2008, 11:14 AM   #14
Admiral
 
Nausikaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Default

For me bread on a boat is a task for the pressure cooker. Such a versitile bit of kit.

Aye // Stephen
__________________

__________________
Yacht NAUSIKAA | Call Sign: 2AJH2




WHEN WAS THE LAST TIME YOU DID SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME?

www.nausikaa.org.uk

= Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Lithuania
Nausikaa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
seeing the world from a new perspective AndrewRK General Cruising Forum 2 09-03-2005 03:19 PM

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

RV & Travel Trailer Communities

Our RV & Travel Trailer sites encompasses virtually all types of Recreational Vehicles, from brand-specific to general RV communities.

» More about our RV Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0