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Old 05-22-2008, 09:23 PM   #15
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Our pilothouse motorsailer m/s "Olivebank" managed to sail to the east coast U.S. from Scotland and made the trip very well.

These boats are definitely 'bluewater' vessels; although frankly, I prefer coastal cruising and my desire to traverse the Atlantic has dwindled with the years added to age!

Olivebank

http://www.eastcoasthorizon.com/Claymore/index.htm
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Old 03-25-2013, 03:19 AM   #16
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The original Cal cruising 46 by Lapworth are solid blue water boats
50 years ahead of its time, indoor and out steering stations
A main saloon more spacious than my studio apartment in New York
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Old 09-14-2013, 10:02 AM   #17
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Any experience with a Cheoy Lee 43 motorsailer?? I am looking at one and she looks very sturdy to me.
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Old 10-10-2013, 06:00 PM   #18
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FYI, the September 2013 issue of Good Old Boat has an article in it about pilot house sailboats. This week, I'm in the process of re-caulking seams, scraping, and painting our charthouse (a low version of a pilothouse) and I must say, I love having the views. Also, the ability to sit inside in drizzle and sail rather than being outside in the cold...burrrrrr...
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Old 10-10-2013, 07:59 PM   #19
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Our allied mistress has a hard dodger built by the previous owner. Seems strong enough. Only issue we have is that it creates a down draft for the Dickenson heater... The chimney is in front of it... So not very well thought out but being in new england it definitely makes life little better... May ditch it overboard when we hit the tropics...
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Old 10-11-2013, 01:56 AM   #20
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huh, the downdraft is interesting. We have the chimney for a Newport bulkhead heater right in front of the charthouse and it's fine. There's, oh, maybe 12" of charthouse above the top of the chimney. BTW, we have the "H" style chimney top and it works very well. When we're underway, we use it with a 6" stub of chimney, but when in a marina/at anchor for a while, we'll put another 3ft section of pipe on it to get it to draw more. Then, it is above the charthouse and would get "wacked" by the mainboom if we were sailing
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Old 10-11-2013, 11:41 AM   #21
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Interesting... So may be the dodger isn't the problem... Not sure then why we can't get a good burn... Our is also a new port heater.
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Old 10-11-2013, 02:51 PM   #22
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digressing here, but it took us a while to get ours to work well. It was always drawing but the valve was gummed up (bought it used) which limited heat output/diesel flow. It finally starting working well after we used it a while. We used the fan quite a bit to keep it drawing in the early-days-of-not-knowing-how-to-use-it-with-the-gummed-up-valve All's well that ends well and ours works great now. Good luck with yours. You know you can used the fan to assist the draw.
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Old 06-28-2014, 06:14 AM   #23
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I see a thread on almost every sailing forum that questions the safety or seaworthiness of a pilot house on a sailboat. Those "big windows" look so dangerous!

Consider this: most of the sailboats that sink each year were NOT pilot house boats!
Given that, one might assume that people would avoid the boats that don't have a pilot house!

So which is more likely to sink? If there were statistics that showed the ratio of sinkings of sailboats that had or did not have pilot houses, I suspect the pilot house designs would come out ahead.

My POV is that sailors should be more worried about other things. Like putting their hatch boards in place, and avoiding a knockdown or deploying a Jordan series drogue properly rather than lying a hull during a gale, or avoid trying to surf big waves with a fatigued or inexperienced crew that lets the boat yaw while running, etc.

But it is the Little Things that can sink you. For example, how many boats each year sink because some through hull fitting or faulty hose clamp allowed water to fill the boat? How many "sink at the dock?" I other words, boats sink even if they do not have pilot houses.

But what about during a gale? Everyone is worried about green water crashing through those "big windows."

For instance, just tonight I read a very experienced captains story of his voyage in the Southern Ocean off the Falklands. He had put aluminum plates/shutters over his cabin's port lights in preparation for heavy weather. The ports were totally covered in metal plates. Bolted them down. But later, in heavy seas and high winds, his boat began taking on water, quickly! In fact he writes it is likely his boat would have sunk if he had not found the source of leak as soon as he did! It was sloshing around and above the sole and the bow was getting lower. From where? From a thru hull pipe for the forward head that came off the fitting! On top of that, his steering failed! Why? Because a steering cable had jumped the sheave on the steering quadrant! This is a common reason for steering loss, and steering loss is a common reason for people abandoning their boats...but you don't see people questioning the seaworthiness of small yachts because they have wheel steering or heads!
Reading this account helps put things in perspective: Yacht Fiona Antarctica Circumnavigation 2013/14 - Newsletter 2

By the way, tillers rarely fail, but helmsmen often do.

My point?

Well designed pilot houses on well designed boats should not concern you as much as more likely things like failing through hulls and other sources of water ingress, or just plain poor navigation or poor seamanship or poor decisions (like entering a strange harbor at night).

Pilot house yachts made by Nauticat, Cheoy Lee, Perini Navi and many other makers have been successfully cruising and crossing oceans for many years. And some of them have large port lights. Here is one I would not mind having!
2006 Perini Navi Perini 45 mt Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

I will not be worried about the pilot house. Worry about the other things that are more likely to sink you or cause you harm. You know, those little things like thru hulls, swages on standing rigging, and seamanship, like knowing when to shorten sail and when to slow your hull speed in heavy seas, and keeping a real watch for large ship traffic, etc.

Full disclosure, I don't own a pilot house, but I wish I did and I plan to.

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Old 06-28-2014, 01:21 PM   #24
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P. S.

It is easy to misread someone's tone in text messages.

So let me add, everything I wrote above is written in a truly friendly tone of voice and with the sole intent to help by adding another Point of View.

And my mention of the linked example of a yacht in distress and taking on water and loss of steering is NOT a criticism of that captain. In fact I highly regard him and his experience. In fact I think his example of how he quickly FIXED the problems despite heavy seas and high winds in a very dangerous place on the water is a great example of good seamanship and a sailors resourcefulness and ability to get through a possibly disastrous challenge. I linked his story because I think others can learn something by his good example. I did.
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Old 06-29-2014, 04:40 AM   #25
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Steady Hand,

You're correct about all the things that sink boats!

About pilot houses--Three months into our San Francisco to Alaska trip, I have a few things to relate:

In March, we went through three nights (consecutive) of gale force winds with gusts into storm force winds. During two of those nights we had very hazardous seas off the Oregon coast and experienced waves washing over the boat. At one point, with steep wind waves from the SSW and large ground swell from the W, with the wind waves occasionally filling the cockpit from the stern, we also had big smacks of the groundswell crashing into the pilothouse/charthouse while sweeping across the boat midships.

At one point during the gales, I sat side-by-side with my hubby in the chart house. We sat on the port side of the boat and as the waves would crash against the windows, I would look over at him and I could see the small flex of the cabin wall inwards towards us as tons of water pounded against it. Tiny drops of water squeezed through between the wood frame and 30 year-old glazing compound. All I could think was "why didn't we rebuild the charthouse while we were doing the rest of the boat?" but all went well as we made it just fine.

That weather (in late March) was brutal because it was so cold. The air temperature was in the 40's and the wind was blowing 40 kts and then some. We would have NEVER been able to sail the boat, shorthanded as we did, without having the safety and comfort of the charthouse.

And here 3 months into a cold, wet trip, I am 100% sure that we would not have been able to actually do this entire trip without that shelter from the elements as we sail or motor. We are well rested and warm inside vs frazzled and cold outside. That in itself makes us safer as we sail.

Fair winds,
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Old 06-29-2014, 03:23 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbopeep View Post
Steady Hand,

You're correct about all the things that sink boats!

About pilot houses--Three months into our San Francisco to Alaska trip, I have a few things to relate:

In March, we went through three nights (consecutive) of gale force winds with gusts into storm force winds. During two of those nights we had very hazardous seas off the Oregon coast and experienced waves washing over the boat. At one point, with steep wind waves from the SSW and large ground swell from the W, with the wind waves occasionally filling the cockpit from the stern, we also had big smacks of the groundswell crashing into the pilothouse/charthouse while sweeping across the boat midships.

..... CLIP....

That weather (in late March) was brutal because it was so cold. The air temperature was in the 40's and the wind was blowing 40 kts and then some. We would have NEVER been able to sail the boat, shorthanded as we did, without having the safety and comfort of the charthouse.

And here 3 months into a cold, wet trip, I am 100% sure that we would not have been able to actually do this entire trip without that shelter from the elements as we sail or motor. We are well rested and warm inside vs frazzled and cold outside. That in itself makes us safer as we sail.

Fair winds,
Howdy!

I am new here, as I just found this forum a couple of days ago. I am glad I did, and I have enjoyed several hours reading many of the threads here, and often found myself enjoying your posts on diverse topics.

Your post up above, is another one I enjoyed, and I thank you for your detailed description and your candor.

The thing you wrote that really resonates with my thoughts on the "safety" of pilot house issue is the safety of the boat and crew in challenging conditions.

I do have more thoughts on this, but perhaps it is best I share them in another thread, as it may be better for searching later and the topic may change course.
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