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Old 01-25-2007, 02:51 PM   #15
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I have found the first few days on the boat is when I get a little sea sick. I think that this is just being out of shape. Ginger candy helps, You can get it of the web.

Exercise before the cruise should help but I don't (but should) before I cruise.
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Old 01-25-2007, 03:14 PM   #16
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Seasickness is incapacitating and, as they say, there are three dgrees of it:

1. When you are worried you will die

2. When you know you are going to die

and

3. When you are affraid you won't die

It is awfull but it is something most people get over after a while. I have spent many years on the bridge of coast guard boats with plastic bags in my pocket...just in case.

The real problem though is fear. I have seen seasick crew members (myself included) getting on with the job as best they can but I have also seen people who have been paralised with fear and yet have not been seasick.

If a guy gets seasick you can just leave him to it (to a large extent) but when someone freezes with fear you never know what will happen next.

As for a remedy for seasickness - fresh air, keep your eyes on the horizon, don't just sit there but do something useful e.g. steer the boat and avoid heavy meals before sailing or when bad weather is expected. Also, try to keep in shape. Your stomach muscles will cope much better with the conditions if you don't have a large beer belly flopping arround.

And enjoy the voyage!

Stephen

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Old 01-26-2007, 12:57 AM   #17
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<font size="3">The ULTIMATE cure for sea sickness?

Sit under a coconut tree for a few hours.

Guaranteed to work.

Myth Busters did a recent segment on the subject and the winner was... Ginger.

Kirk</font id="size3">
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Old 01-28-2007, 01:11 AM   #18
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One can also try sleeping it off - not for those on watch of course.

Stephen

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Old 01-28-2007, 06:56 AM   #19
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I understand Gilligan thought Ginger was the best cure for most ills.
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Old 01-29-2007, 05:10 AM   #20
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This is a great topic! And it's really interesting to see so many different ways that folks are affected by MS, and how they treat themselves for it.

My background is as a fisheries biologist, and I spend a lot of time in boats, above decks and below, in calm and rough conditions, on rivers, lakes and in the bigger "ponds" of salt-water, for both work and pleasure. I also spend a good deal of time each fall in a helicopter, zipping through very tight canyons (lots of winding and spinning) conducting salmon nesting surveys. I've had both good days, and not so good days.

I really enjoy the good days, but not so much the bad days, and it always seems like it's the bad days that stay with you the longest - bummer!

MS comes upon me when I'm usually dressed too warm for the occasion, if I'm not feeling very well to begin with (like have the flu or a bad cold), if I've partaken in foods that are too rich and oily, if there is a particularly noxious aroma in the air (diesel exhaust fumes are not good to me), if someone else gets sick and I have to remain in very close quarters with them, and if I've imbibed a bit too much "grog" the night previously. And, oh yes, if I spend too much time with my head down, trying to read or record data while the boat or chopper are constantly spinning, bobbing, and weaving - that's not so good either.

What helps me? Fresh air (and I stress FRESH air), and trying to remain as calm and cool as possible. Sleep is also good - definitely go for the "vapors" if you need to - if you're in a pretty bad state, and can't keep a good outlook on life, you're probably not going to be good company, and we all like good company when confined to a small floating island! Also, I've seen that other folks have written about being kind to their digestive systems by sticking with starchy foods - me too - even something as basic as a peanutbutter and jelly sandwich is OK for me, nothing too sweet, and sometimes salty foods help (like beef jerky, and/or saltine crackers). Odd that for me salty foods are good, because for some folks it only makes things worse. Definitely keep hydrated - gingerale as well as coca-cola also help me out, in small quantities, and cold!

Anyway, It's all true, MS will come upon folks in different ways, and you may experience mild reactions, or it might just lay you out like being hit by a prize-fighter. What I have learned is that once you start feeling crummy, you generally won't be able to stop it - just let it run it's course. Puking helps for short periods of time - I'm not sure why. Just remember that you're not really ill; while you may feel like the end of the world is at hand, it will pass. Try and keep a lighthearted outlook on life - joking and singing won't necessarily make it "better" from a physical standpoint, but it will help with keeping your mind off the worst of the crummy feelings!

Try not to get too stressed, and enjoy being out in the "real" world!!
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Old 01-30-2007, 05:26 AM   #21
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A wise schooner captain once told me "eat something easy before you put to sea, oatmeal is good, avoid Jambalaya."

The problem with MS is that is really is in your head, it happens partly because the information coming from your inner ear (balance) disagrees with what your eyes see. That is why you tend to get sick when you no longer have something to look at on the horizon.

I did a delivery from the DR to San Juan some years ago on a schooner. We motored the first couple of days and those deep draft full keep boats really roll when there is no wind in the sails. I tossed my lunch, then my guts and eventually my stomach reached down grabbed my shoes and somehow pushed them up my throat in its desperate quest to convince me to commit suicide. I slept on deck, it was so bad I did not notice that my mattress was made of wood.

I am one of those people who gets worse if I go below, and worse if I am exposed to diesel. By day 5 I was helping change the engine oil. I also got one of the best rides of my life on the bowsprit while beating into the trades in the Mona Passage. Off shore has an opportunity for magic that happens nowhere else.

I find if I have nothing to do or think about I get sick more easily, and reading or being below decks makes it worse. If you must go below decks to lie down for goodness sakes close your eyes.

I think the advice from several of the other writers is all good. I will add that when I am the captain I do not take dramamine or anything else that clouds my judgement. I find that the drugs mess up my thinking more than the sea sickness. Your milage may vary, this is my personal experience.

Good luck, 8 weeks should be a lot of fun
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Old 01-30-2007, 06:07 AM   #22
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This business about MS is realy interesting.

I have seen my fair share of bad weather. The last ship I commanded (a 51 metre coast guard vessel)was sent to the area north of Iceland, between Greenland and Norway and for three days we had 17 metre waves. The wave height was measured by special buoys and not just guessed at. And yet none of us was sick. I turned the ship and ran slowly before the wind. Had it been worse, I might have been forced to heave to but as it was we survived very comfortably.

Many of us have been there and done that, although it seems that no one ever thought of buying the T-shirt. Not to worry. Many of us will be going back there and maybe we will get the T-shirt next time?

But in all seriousness, there must have been millions spent on research on this subject. After all, the navies of this world all want their seamen not to be sick and the military has always been wiling to spend money on research which can advance naval technology (not to be confused with the comfort of the common seaman).

One thing which appeared on the market a while ago was anti sea-sickness plasters which were fastned behind the ears. I tried them once but the weather remained calm so it was not a fair test...and no, I didn't get sick. It is a bit like taking an umbrela with you when you go out. it seems that there is less chance of rain if you have it with you than if you don't. Anyone got any experience of these plasters?

My first captain, the one who said, "I don't mind you writing your name in the wake but don't go back to dot the i's laddie" also said that, "there is nothing quite so satisfying as seeing an apprentice bringing his guts up". Things have changed. When I am in command of a ship or my yacht, then I am very concerned for the well being of the people on board and have been known to take quite large diversions round bad weather. I suppose that is about as close to "sitting under a coconut tree" as we can get. Incidentally, if you do sit under a coconut tree, wear a hard hat. Those nuts can make you feel far worse than MS.

The bottom line is that bad weather is a strain on the crew but also on the ship and should IMHO be avoided if possible.

Stephen

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Old 01-30-2007, 09:24 AM   #23
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How many sailors have never been sea sick?

I can honestly say that in my 30+ years of sailing, I have never been sea sick. I have been in situations in which everyone around me was sick and yet I felt just fine. I've even been in a hot diesel fume filled engine compartment in rough seas without any sensation of motion sickness. I am Dutch and have met several other sailors of Dutch descent who claim the same. I've often wondered if there is some genetic element to resistance to MS.
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Old 01-30-2007, 01:21 PM   #24
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I can imagine how debilitating seasickness is, but I also have never suffered from it. I bought my first boat in 1972. My father who sailed on minesweepers in the North Sea during the latter part of WW2 also claimed to never have suffered from seasickness.

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Old 01-31-2007, 07:58 PM   #25
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Out of 5 years at the merchant navy, i was sick the first 11 months.

I tried everything, beer, rum, eating, no eating, lie down, looking for the center of gravity, staring at the horizon, medication, etc...... Nothing worked.

After 11 months on board i braced myself for another trip, leaving port to enjoy a 3 week period of seasickness..... but it was gone en never came back to me.

I was so happy that i drank to much beer and enjoyd an enormous hangover (wich is better than seasickness)...... I can't explain wy.. it was just gone........
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:12 PM   #26
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There Is now an Electronic wrist ban available for Sea sickness and Motion Sickness. Visit http://www.7knots.com/CGI/list_forum.pl?board=Cruising_Liveaboard&view=675&s croll=
Ocean Senior Sailor.
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Old 02-27-2014, 03:20 AM   #27
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Get some juice or pop and salted crackers down your neck. But 8 weeks is a long trip to test yourself. What if you don't get over it?
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Old 02-27-2014, 01:39 PM   #28
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I swear by the wrist bands, although a few years ago, in the waters around the Galapagos Islands, (as passenger, not crew) I backed them up with some homeopathic medication (pills) containing the following.. Apomorph, Staphisagria, Cocculus, Theridion, Petroleum, Tabacum & Nux Vomica. all at dose 6c. - and I am glad to say that that worked. - I was determined not to have the trip spoilt by seasickness!!
I was also once told by a crew member on a ferry in rather fierce Bay of Biscay, to eat apples.
Best of luck.. !!
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