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Old 04-25-2007, 10:25 AM   #1
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Piracy_Q1_2007.jpg

I attach the report of the only so called Piracy attack on a yacht - which is extracted

from the International Piracy Reporting Centre's report for the first 3 months of 2007.

2007_Q1_IMB_Piracy_Report.pdf
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Old 04-26-2007, 08:33 AM   #2
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Google piracy map:

http://www.icc-ccs.org/extra/display.php
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Old 04-26-2007, 10:16 AM   #3
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and the moral to that story (errr map) is "Stay Away From Land" !!.

Seriously though, I've often thought it would be brilliant to sail around the Indonesian islands but realistically you'd be taking your chances.

or sail the 'caps' (it may be cold but strangely enough there are no reported piracy incidents there )
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Old 04-26-2007, 10:56 AM   #4
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I don't want to sounds too cynical, as I'm pretty sure not every act of piracy against yachts is registered....and maybe not with this ICC group in any event.

Let us remember, ICC are a commercial concern only funded because their supporters are fearful of piracy. So no fear, no funding, no ICC.

The positives in this report are that it apparently shows piracy is decreasing. Almost half in 206 what it was in 2003.

Cheers

Cheers

JOHN
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Old 04-26-2007, 12:08 PM   #5
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Before we sailed to Indonesia in '97, we were told by friends who had bicycled through Indonesia and Malaysia that "Indonesia was beautiful but we didn't like the people, Malaysia not as pretty but the people were very nice."

Indonesia and Malaysia share a language, a culture, and a religion. Yet we, too, found many Indonesians to be less likeable than Malaysians. Not that all Indonesians were bad, but the greed and aggressiveness of so many of them was a bit off-putting. Still, I loved Indonesia and wouldn't hesitate to go back. Avoid the very touristy areas, and the big ship ports. Notice that it's cargo ships at anchor that are the target. As usual, that's where the money and saleable items to be stolen can be found.

It seems that most of the piracy attempts were unsuccessful. I appreciate that better reporting of piracy incidents will improve security, but unfortunately people who read only the first few pages, which show numbers, not what really happened, will respond with "'omigod, it's dangerous out there."

The reported incident concerning a private yacht was a non-event - two boats followed a few, no contact, nothing happened. There's really no way of knowing if this was just a fishing boat with curious crew on board. And it's the Blue Water Rally, a bunch of boats that aren't particularly brave and pay a lot of money to have their hands held around the world. I'm afraid that I am skeptical of that report.

I agree that one should be careful, but not terrified of what's out there.

Fair winds,

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Old 04-26-2007, 12:29 PM   #6
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If it is accepted that in the 1st 3 months of this year , there was only 1 so-called report of piracy against a cruising yacht in all the seas and oceans of this planet.

Could it be that there is an infinitesimal risk of a yacht being a piracy victim ?

We already know that not all incidents are reported. However, we do know that the serious, bad ones are picked up and reported.

If anyone has information about piracy, robbery which involved members of the cruising community, it would be of great service to all of us, to bring it to our forums.
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:45 PM   #7
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I received the email below from Carl aboard Arioso - he has just completed a trip from Spain to Barbados.

JohnT

------------------------------------

I suppose that two-thirds of the landsmen I talk to about my sailing raise the issue of pirates. I've read the various reports about piracy, and kept up with the issue, but have always assumed that I could avoid all danger by staying out of a few danger spots. Well, that's not quite the case! On our first full day out of El Hierro (one of the Canaries), a large fishing vessel from the Cape Verdes came into view over the horizon. We suspect (but don't know for sure) that she changed course to intersect us when she saw us on her horizon. In any case, she came at us on a fairly close course, to cross our wake. As she was abreast of us she called us on VHF radio. The call was unusual in that it didn't start with the normal protocol in which the calling vessel gives her name a couple times. So it was an anonymous call. Friendly, though. The English speaker seemed to want to chat, which was ok. But as we were chatting, she changed course to follow us from astern. There's no good reason for this unless they had evil intent. If they'd wanted to sell fish, they'd have been closer and would have raised the possibility on the radio. The reason a pirate would follow from behind is to obscure his vessel's name, so we'd have no way to identify the attacker. This move on her part was very suspicious. I immediately requested/insisted that she keep her distance and resume her former course. I got no reply. I gave the microphone to Diane, in the hopes that her Spanish would communicate our concern and request. As soon as she started talking, the fishing vessel asked how many crew we had aboard. This is none of their damned business; asking the question is one of the critical signs of potential piracy. They want to know how many crew they have to overcome. We had all four of us in the cockpit at this point. I didn't answer their question, but as forcefully as I could (in English) insisted that they resume their course, and that we would actively defend ourselves. They didn't reply, but did resume something like their earlier course.

We watched them as they slowly disappeared over the horizon to our stern. Then we turned on our radar to continue tracking them (the radar reaches beyond our visual range, for some strange reason that escapes my pathetic knowledge of radio waves). As soon as they went over our visual horizon, they changed course to intersect us again some hours in the future. At this point we changed course 90 degrees to starboard, away from them, then did two more course changes in the succeeding hours. All the time, we kept our radar on to be sure they were off our radar horizon.

So, was this a Cape Verdian pirate we'd escaped?, or a friendly fishing vessel we'd insulted? In my opinion, there is no question: he hid his stern and followed, he asked about our crew, and he attempted a second intersection. Nobody out fishing for a living would do any of the above unless he was running a side line of piracy of easily overwhelmed pleasure boats. We escaped by being obviously aware of the situation, and by bluffing, and then by hiding.

I had been warned last August by a slightly mad sailor that poor fishermen in the Atlantic were turning to piracy because they couldn't make a living due to declining fish stocks and increasing diesel costs. I dismissed his theory at the time (along with others that were (seemed?) much crazier), but I now believe he was right. Presumably fairly gentle pirates had made a definite pass at us, but had backed off. The general expectation is that, had they boarded Arioso, they would have take whatever they could of value and then left without us ever knowing their vessel's name or home port. Of course worse is possible. That's the scariest thing about piracy.
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Old 06-05-2007, 07:58 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
I received the email below from Carl aboard Arioso - he has just completed a trip from Spain to Barbados.

So, was this a Cape Verdian pirate we'd escaped?, or a friendly fishing vessel we'd insulted? In my opinion, there is no question: he hid his stern and followed, he asked about our crew, and he attempted a second intersection. Nobody out fishing for a living would do any of the above unless he was running a side line of piracy of easily overwhelmed pleasure boats. We escaped by being obviously aware of the situation, and by bluffing, and then by hiding.

I had been warned last August by a slightly mad sailor that poor fishermen in the Atlantic were turning to piracy because they couldn't make a living due to declining fish stocks and increasing diesel costs. I dismissed his theory at the time (along with others that were (seemed?) much crazier), but I now believe he was right. Presumably fairly gentle pirates had made a definite pass at us, but had backed off. The general expectation is that, had they boarded Arioso, they would have take whatever they could of value and then left without us ever knowing their vessel's name or home port. Of course worse is possible. That's the scariest thing about piracy.
Hi JohnT,

"

Thanks for Arioso's report on their encounter - it is not possible to place it for sure into the "Piracy in basket" I don't suppose we will ever know.

Unfortunately encounters like this one are common. In the seas of South East Asia where there hundreds of thousands of indigenous craft going about all sorts of business - when one sees a boat suddenly changing direction and taking a course to intersect with your own , the natural reaction is to keep an eye on that boat. Most times it passes and carries on somewhere. Sometimes they come close to sell fish, sometimes for a cigarette, sometimes just to say hello and look at people just messing about on a boat.

If real pirate attacks were taking place frequently on the cruising community - news of these would quickly surface.
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Old 06-05-2007, 06:04 PM   #9
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The Caribean Safety and Security Net is on the SSB daily in the Caribe with reports of not only piracy...but any crimes against cruisers.

You can do an island by island search on their website t see what ha happened in past months.

Check ut the link if you are planning a cruise here:

http://www.safetyandsecuritynet.com/reports.html
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Old 06-06-2007, 12:30 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
The Caribean Safety and Security Net is on the SSB daily in the Caribe with reports of not only piracy...but any crimes against cruisers.

You can do an island by island search on their website t see what ha happened in past months.

Check ut the link if you are planning a cruise here:

http://www.safetyandsecuritynet.com/reports.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks ,

In general terms S.E. ASIAN waters cruising yachts have a much more happier time.

Richard
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Old 06-07-2007, 09:24 PM   #11
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On passage from Sri Lanka to Salalah, about 400 miles from land, we experienced large fishing boats using several miles long surface nets. Supported by floats about the size of tennis balls and polystyrene block wrapped in black plastic, they were not easy to spot in daylight and impossible at night. We were under engine much of the time (no reliable trade winds in the Indian Ocean this spring) and were caught three times. We freed ourselves once and were freed by a fishing boat twice - costing us 2 bottles of rum, 400 cigarettes, 4 boxes of biscuis (all these being forced gifts),slight damage to the hull and rail wher the fishing boat came alongside without mch care, and our best pair of binoculars (stolen). The only good part was hearing on the VHF calls made in adequate Englsh to a ship, from a fishing boat, with more and more hystria, as the ship haded for and then through a net. Our 120 hp got stalled by the net, but the ship's prop won, by the sound of it. However, 20 fisherman bearing down on us was not funny at the time. Are such nets legal ?

John
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Old 06-07-2007, 10:30 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelfan View Post
On passage from Sri Lanka to Salalah, about 400 miles from land, we experienced large fishing boats using several miles long surface nets. Are such nets legal ?

John
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Hi John, Unfortunately, these nets are quite legal. Equally as bad are the long liners.

For general information can you provide the date and approximate Lat/Long where you had this encounter ?
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Old 06-08-2007, 07:13 AM   #13
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In truth, we don't know if those nets were legal or not. It simply depends upon the laws of the fishing vessels' flag state(s). Also, most countries have legislation regarding the marking of fishing gear. If the gear is improperly marked then the fisherman has no come back if nets or lines are carried away by ships' props. Of course that does not help the little cruiser which gets stuck in the nets.

Regarding the enforcement of fishing gear regulations, there are very few countries around the Indian Ocaean with the capacity to enforce regulations in their waters and EEZ let alone upon the high seas.

We can protest all we like but I don't think it will lead anywhere within my lifetime.

Aye,

Stephen

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Old 06-08-2007, 08:32 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nausikaa View Post
We can protest all we like but I don't think it will lead anywhere within my lifetime.

Stephen
This paper supports the contention that if the fishing boat's country does not prohibit drift net fishing in the Northern Indian Ocean it is legal for that boat to do so in international waters :-

http://www.earthtrust.org/dnpaper/intllaw.html
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