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Old 11-29-2008, 08:52 PM   #15
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Marelon is far superior to bronze seacocks as they eliminate the electrolysis problems; the lightning strike problems; and the permanently frozen valve problems that bronze seacocks are famous for. . .

The handle of the Marelon seacock is a weak point. But it you know the secret, you can avoid broken handles very easily. Each Marelon seacock is made of three parts; the base, the ball valve, and the top casing. You will notice that there are two large "hex nut" shapes molded into the seacock - one on the base and one on the top body. Any valve will stick if it is not exercised reasonably frequently. When that happens - before you exert excessive pressure on the handle and snap it off - - you put a wrench or spanner on the bottom hex nut portion and another on the upper body hex nut portion and turn counterclockwise a little bit (not too much). This takes the pressure off the internal ball and then the handle will rotate the ball easily enough to "relubricate" the ball. After you have exercised the valve a bit you can tighten the base and upper body back to where they were.
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Old 07-23-2009, 02:45 AM   #16
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I really appreciate the essay on repacking the stuffing box. I did mine last weekend in the water. It came with the boat so I had no idea of how old it was and it was getting too warm for my liking.

With the help of the article I was fully prepared, and once I'd cracked it the leak was nowhere as bad as I expected so i could take my time.

Four rings of flax later, and after an hour of run in and adjustment it's cool to touch and no leaks. So Thanks!
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Old 09-14-2010, 06:45 AM   #17
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Currently my Bronze Apollo Conbreaco ball valve seacocks are starting to seep sea water from around that 1/8" plug in the side of the seacock body.

These seacocks were installed in San Francisco, circa 1996, and were never bonded.

They have always worked well, no problems turning on or off, and these were the older version that didn't have the valve stem handle problem.

Finally, I removed one of the little plugs, and wire brushed it clean. The threaded portion had turned pink .

Most of us know that the pink color comes from de-zincification, and replacement is needed.

Since I am suspect of any bronze plugs that I might purchase here in Singapore, I have an idea to use the unthreaded shoulder area on long silicon bronze bolts, threading that, grinding the 4 square flats for the wrench, then installing that as a replacement plug.

Would this be a suitable and reliable repair ?

Douglas
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Old 09-14-2010, 08:59 AM   #18
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Douglas,

If you have the die to cut the bronze and a lubricant so as not to cause the threads to shear off as they are being cut (a problem both brass and bronze share) and can grind the corners down evenly; than yes it would work. Though it might be easier to have them shipped to you from the UK or Canada or Japan. Also if you are going to make the bolt for the hole I would use a matched blind tap (meant to allow bottoming out in a hole) to make sure the inner threads of the plug are in good condition and will mate well with the replacement.

This information does not come from my experience in boat maintenance so please let someone with more knowledge comment. It does come from experience working as an industrial pipefitter and having had to deal with low and high pressure system and making one off parts for machines. As well as good bit of other life and work experience along the way.

Michael
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Old 09-14-2010, 01:06 PM   #19
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Thank You for your reply Michael .

My usual problem when cutting threads with a die on a shaft, is that the threads don't cut evenly square to that shaft.

I think it is because I am not able to hold the "Tee" handle square to start the threads, with ?

I did run a 1/8" X 27 tapered pipe tap down into the hole in the side of the seacock, but it didn't bottom out on anything,,,, must be , because it went into the thru hole in the ball , this is the shut off position.

I am wondering if there will be any pink showing on the threaded seacock body, which is not readily vissable ?

Douglas
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Old 09-14-2010, 02:21 PM   #20
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You are not going to like this answer,

If in doubt check, when you check if in doubt that it will hold and stay functional (not fail) replace it. These are costly words but the other option is much more costly. A failed through hull is not something I even want think about. If the boat is on the hard and you can afford the time for a full check, that would be my best advice. Not what a lot of people want to hear but safest and wisest over the long run.

Michael
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Old 09-14-2010, 03:37 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calliste View Post

Thank You for your reply Michael .

My usual problem when cutting threads with a die on a shaft, is that the threads don't cut evenly square to that shaft.

I think it is because I am not able to hold the "Tee" handle square to start the threads, with ?

I did run a 1/8" X 27 tapered pipe tap down into the hole in the side of the seacock, but it didn't bottom out on anything,,,, must be , because it went into the thru hole in the ball , this is the shut off position.

I am wondering if there will be any pink showing on the threaded seacock body, which is not readily vissable ?

Douglas
That little thing you're talking about is the drain plug. I would imagine that your vendor/supplier may have used a brass plug rather than bronze. The rest of the valve body casting may very well be bronze but the plug not. Replacing it makes good sense. If you don't have a threaded drain plug, yes, make your own, for sure. Luckily for you, it isn't a structural part of the seacock.

It is difficult to thread a shaft as you've mentioned. Hubby has become quite expert at the task since he threaded bronze rod from 1/4" up to 1" rod stock during our rebuild. His advice--put the rod (your bolt stock) into a vise--once you've started the threading, you have some key moments early on to make it right--use a T-Square or triangle, don't eye-ball it. Use a tapping fluid or other lubricant to make your job easier. You can change things within the first several threads and then you're stuck with your results after that.

With a traditional boat, we mostly (99% of them!) bronze fasteners throughout the boat. So, we keep scraps of keel bolts (bronze from 5/8" up to 1") as well as bits of bronze rod stock in smaller sizes around to make our own long bolts as needed. We, of course, have to keep nuts and washers of the same sizes as the rod stock but it all works out.

Good luck!
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